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CH from the institute. It's outside to
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just use a trans generational X when
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you go from a or to the Australian
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trans generational walls is it only go
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on with your in female ones you know
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and when you do this for a transfer
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this is only here No it it's it's
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interesting when you look at the the
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studies that on our managing and this
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is a very recent literature but both
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males and females are offspring are
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affected. And it very much depends on
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the nature of the three nights leans
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over my to three prenatal treatment but
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it does it transmit through two males
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and females among generation So it's
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not it's not just in one sense. It's
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not a very nicely I think are you gonna
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buy the gender differences that that's
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fine and what where how You explain can
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you you know we have or can use but is
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this a few expression Yeah so it's
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that's a that's fantastic question so
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we know that when we're exposing in
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like just stationed codewords and
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certain in the human features there's a
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lot of sexual differentiation going on
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within the brain at that point in time
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certainly in the guinea pig as a low
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sexual differentiation was going on
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right. Um but at around like fifty so
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it's possible to go with the somewhere
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in interacting with that process we've
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got to levels of a set does not the
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sort of simple stuff and it's not
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simple it's not the mile fixes it
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express less receptors than females and
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so they're less affected. Um so I think
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it's something probably to do with with
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with sexual differentiation of at
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different parts right what is really
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interesting is when you look at
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outcomes following maternal stress and
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there's been some some fantastic
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studies looking at gender of different
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gender affects following maternal
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stress and we said following I could
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put a good exposure is that when you
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look at but means the female patterns
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of gene expression female patterns of
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behaviour in males and females what
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tends to happen is obviously directed
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their sex differences in those
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behaviours what tends to happen is that
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with an insult like three nights stress
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on insult like prenatal quoted exposure
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you tend to move the female phenotype
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moved towards the mile as a result of
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the expulsion and also that's quite a
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number of the children only after the
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plants. So serious problems shortly
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before or something. But they
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apparently don't have this according to
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what is the statistics on the use of it
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what kind what is the problem right I
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think and the that's a very simple
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question so you see section closed some
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I think the human it would be sites I
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we could start to increase maybe three
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three weeks before gestation the
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numbers are kind of difficult to get
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obviously. Um but so I could turn the
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the C section close to but then and
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"'cause" so it is not a result of the
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button process there is the result
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there is an increase in particular
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functions as a result the birthing
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process which is clearly quite
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stressful to the features. Um but it
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back search I wish I knew this was
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before within the last few weeks of
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gestation. So it is actually because
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before but then I want to have the
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exposure but it's an interesting point
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because one of the things that
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certainly I wear my my hat as a member
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of obsession on ecology is the one of
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the areas my concern is the preterm
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infant that's actually born between
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thirty two and thirty six six weeks of
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gestation and the outcomes in most
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children is generally quite hole. And
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as not being investigated in in in a
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lot of the talents and a lot of
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interest in investigation of those
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children because those children that
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one thirty six weeks might not of been
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exposed to high levels but difficult
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could search. And if the if if but
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preterm birth was not diagnosed but
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both thirty two weeks they won't of got
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syntactically people to quit. So there
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is an area where there is not difficult
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good coverage and that might be the
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basis some problems. So the records
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also important in the bow and that's
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unnecessary for the fickle bright What
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oh oh so that's oh or it's or oh okay
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well that's not so we oh your ass for a
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recess yeah you know agents you know
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you re a watch the light I don't board
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C is that it is value value uhuh you
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know I was yeah I I I I couldn't agree
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more but the reason that we're
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interested in a in the words all is the
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because ten percent of all pregnant
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women are currently being exposed just
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syntactically record code and for that
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reason very interested in long term
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outcomes I completely agree with we the
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issues around media now we know that
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that's very important. We simply have
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to do you know yeah yeah oh oh oh oh
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yeah excellent question I'm sure those
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those a number of wise which can
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connect screen idol stress prenatal
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adversity to long term a neurologic
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decline. Um one of the like the
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simplest on is is that we know that
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early exposure to pretty nice stress
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early exposure to syntactically good
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could actually does reduce the number
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of neurons within the campus. We now a
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as an individual ages capital when your
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arms are dying and so in terms of just
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simply conceptualising that there's a
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point when the number of neurons tying
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will start to open but the loss of
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neurons is going to start to have I and
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affect on function and if you're born
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with ten percent less people camp on
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your arms up as a result of being
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exposed to bring I can stressful a
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results in particular record good
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exposure then maybe that time point
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yeah and if you happen so that's one
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very simple explanation but I'm sure
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there's much more complex in fact
00:08:11
ageing studies following prenatal
00:08:13
insults of not being down in any way as

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Conference Program

Introduction to the 12th Nestlé International Nutrition Symposium
Thomas Beck, NRC Director
22 Oct. 2015 · 8:57 a.m.
418 views
Introduction to Session I - Cognitive & Brain Development
Susan Gasser, Friedrich Miescher Institute, Basel, Switzerland
22 Oct. 2015 · 9:04 a.m.
The development of a healthy brain
Michael Gazzaniga, University of California, Santa Barbara, USA
22 Oct. 2015 · 9:16 a.m.
221 views
Q&A - The development of a healthy brain
Michael Gazzaniga, University of California, Santa Barbara, USA
22 Oct. 2015 · 9:56 a.m.
Early influences on brain development and epigenetics
Stephen G. Matthews, University of Toronto, Canada
22 Oct. 2015 · 10:49 a.m.
Q&A - Early influences on brain development and epigenetics
Stephen G. Matthews, University of Toronto, Canada
22 Oct. 2015 · 11:29 a.m.
Building the physiology of thought
Rebecca Saxe, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USA
22 Oct. 2015 · 11:38 a.m.
154 views
Q&A - Building the physiology of thought
Rebecca Saxe, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USA
22 Oct. 2015 · 12:10 p.m.
Introduction to Session II - Cognitive Decline
Kathinka Evers
22 Oct. 2015 · 2:02 p.m.
Brain health & brain diseases - future perspectives
Richard Frackowiak, CHUV University Hospital, Lausanne, Switzerland
22 Oct. 2015 · 2:11 p.m.
Alzheimer's disease: genome-wide clues for novel therapies
Rudolph E. Tanzi, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, USA
22 Oct. 2015 · 3:15 p.m.
Q&A - Alzheimer's disease: genome-wide clues for novel therapies
Rudolph E. Tanzi, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, USA
22 Oct. 2015 · 3:59 p.m.
Immunometabolic regulators of age-related inflammation
Vishwa D. Dixit, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, USA
22 Oct. 2015 · 4:21 p.m.
Q&A - Immunometabolic regulators of age-related inflammation
Vishwa D. Dixit, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, USA
22 Oct. 2015 · 4:59 p.m.
Introduction to Session III - Nutrition & Cognitive Development
Pierre Magistretti, KAUST, Thuwal, Saudi Arabia and EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland
23 Oct. 2015 · 9 a.m.
Energy metabolism in long-term memory formation and enhancement
Cristina M. Alberini, The Center for Neural Science, New York University, USA
23 Oct. 2015 · 9:16 a.m.
129 views
Q&A - Energy metabolism in long-term memory formation and enhancement
Cristina M. Alberini, The Center for Neural Science, New York University, USA
23 Oct. 2015 · 9:53 a.m.
Building the costly human brain: implications for the evolution of slow childhood growth and the origins of diabetes
Christopher Kuzawa, Northwestern University, Evanston, USA
23 Oct. 2015 · 10:29 a.m.
Q&A - Building the costly human brain: implications for the evolution of slow childhood growth and the origins of diabetes
Christopher Kuzawa, Northwestern University, Evanston, USA
23 Oct. 2015 · 10:57 a.m.
Nutrition, growth and the developing brain
Prof. Maureen Black, University of Maryland, School of Medicine, Baltimore, USA
23 Oct. 2015 · 11:09 a.m.
Q&A - Nutrition, growth and the developing brain
Prof. Maureen Black, University of Maryland, School of Medicine, Baltimore, USA
23 Oct. 2015 · 11:49 a.m.
Introduction to Session IV - Decline & Nutritional Intervention
Tamas Bartfai, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, USA
23 Oct. 2015 · 12:48 p.m.
On multi-domain approaches for prevention trials
Miia Kivipelto, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
23 Oct. 2015 · 1:04 p.m.
Q&A - On multi-domain approaches for prevention trials
Miia Kivipelto, MD, PhD, Karolinska Institutet
23 Oct. 2015 · 1:39 p.m.
Methodological challenges in Alzheimer clinical development
Lon S. Schneider, Keck School of Medicine of USC, Los Angeles, USA
23 Oct. 2015 · 1:49 p.m.
Q&A - Methodological challenges in Alzheimer clinical development
Lon S. Schneider, Keck School of Medicine of USC, Los Angeles, USA
23 Oct. 2015 · 2:32 p.m.
We are what we remember: memory and age related memory disorders
Eric R. Kandel, Columbia University, New York, USA
23 Oct. 2015 · 3:03 p.m.
138 views
Concluding Remarks
Stefan Catsicas, Chief Technology Officer, Nestlé SA
23 Oct. 2015 · 3:50 p.m.

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