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Oh very nice presentation that just
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this year wow you indicated that there
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can be an probably isn't dietary or the
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richness with which the friend develops
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oh Are there any studies that indicate
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whether or not you can start that
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dietary intervention. Well like is ten
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years oh oh or the have it all in
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twenties. or someone please as opposed
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to the to do that the first row space
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So there must be a room full of people
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here can answer the question better
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than a fill fill for your job I would
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assume so but is there is there a story
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on that topic I do know I do know that
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my son and all call is the lounge in
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there and you call last week to about
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so the yeah my daughter sprang are
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going out for Indians too because he's
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determine the foetus can taste and he
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wants to make damn sure you have to go
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in the inventors there's Thank you for
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the talk this is a change is lost the
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IBM research I was just want to return
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your comments about voice. And function
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proceeding for so we'll see how that
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occur it's a projected out of the
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balloon and and your disposal an
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experience observations that often for
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proceeds function and growth is
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directed to way of proceeding it's
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function I just I just want to return
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to you know what you showed about the
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are you Reading and ask it doesn't it
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seem that once was right to some extent
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in the URQ it is growing into a a brain
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that is already Reading and those
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functions are being adapted to the new
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growth in a way that's useful to the
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bright in addition TVIPC reorganisation
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or growth perhaps to compensate for the
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injury that that exceeds what would be
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expected if it were so we to replace
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previous function. It's that it seems
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that the function that the greatest
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engaged in this is being re organised
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by the growth and and the the new
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septic formations that occurred during
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a recovery from TV I struck just
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wondered if you could comment on that
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Well it's a it's a good question and
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and out all the theme park to maybe
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Wilson question recovery function
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neurologic senses the reprogramming or
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we purposely of the signals to do other
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things. And some people say well
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there's reproducing which you can can
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see some we can idea another's people
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saying was actually other rewired
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function like cover that function. And
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so there's not a stance of the
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reprogram we purposely. I I I think
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it's like a question that I don't know
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the answer to Uh I sure yeah but oh
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solution for whoa whoa was not a lost
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that's right oh oh oh yeah but want to
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bash slightly or use a contrary that's
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pro rooms. And the feature that I once
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happens you you know it's on these dots
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to a small I I I see it important what
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I like about for the about I oh oh wow
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this week also a a bit of with starts
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that that the materials that that
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that's but I like to work out read the
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question one is products are so we
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start I know that I I well that's what
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it is that we use a a two that's not so
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the what's for at least a all right
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hate is back with a postage yeah oh
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that's what's really some not you can
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also most important things. Uh money
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can be a I to be do we watch TV see for
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vehicles well oh oh all I guess. I you
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know I know we everyday use everybody
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we re oh well require that ice sh you
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know your software system that we are
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mostly one I was at this point oh your
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know it's well a a company of which are
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we know that one would be very that's
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natural. S stops S actually got and I
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see that we see oh oh oh oh so I I was
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I know I know that have to be going
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last summer. So I will argue that
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because you on a is a underestimate he
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that you're myself or easiest besides
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the question is that and reported by a
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we few. So believe that's the I know
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you you you produce such a slash but I
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I think so yeah I I I I that rolls. I I
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I I believe television for the child
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things is to we do that A question a I
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oh absolutely I remember why I threw
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another three slides this is because
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when I hear resource of studies and
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then when I hear there's this whole
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legal structure system summary accounts
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on these little find an okay clog up
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thinking in the and public health in
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general I say I I wonder is are we all
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becoming a little too dainty one little
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finding changes how you think about the
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long term impact on somebody and
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completely undercuts the notion of
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variation resilience resilience as I
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used. And we will have a about genetics
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the results as I'm sure you here where
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so so I my implicit message there was
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we should get this talk about yeah
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because I don't see that it's a good
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thing where we're going whether they
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kinda where scales. So apparently I was
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successful. So Uh_huh yeah yeah So any
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different than this council. So just
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all bonded to get your opinion of you
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know the the efforts of mapping the
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human by to several days solution. But
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it. So it's a little too. do we
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actually need the little resolution
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will will really understand So it's and
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be completely capable yeah so you are
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all the questions that how I said in
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answer to the the the the you know I
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I'll put this if it is the well the
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determination of the mic researcher of
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also kind of like week quantum a
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knowledge of a a billiard ball it I you
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know maybe you you don't need to figure
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out the actual action function the
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brains organise perform actions. We can
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understand how performs actually we
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don't even care what the details of
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neurons are and I I am willing to
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believe that in fifty years people want
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I want to talk about their models of
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how this must be organising or to carry
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out this actually we know crews in the
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in the behavioural domain I mean that's
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already going out but I I think it. I
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think the neural sign is tomorrow will
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spend most of this training and control
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dynamics dozens of mathematics. And the
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there'll be these all time biologists
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that are sitting there looking at where
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the neurons connected they won't they
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won't the different enterprises and I
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think if you're trying to understand
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how the brain gets its job then it's
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more and more actually years ago which
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is why I'm glad my age you're not going
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to learn all that stuff and I right oh
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it's clear that we do have to
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understand the molecular basis you know
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what's going wrong so so you know tier
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as synaptic connection or you know or
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got the receptor it's a secretion or or
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uptake is off and the the basis if you
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look at you know what are the legal
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side connected with a system these are
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structural proteins the personality
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density. So we probably both I yes just
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one I had to something you just said oh
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the genes are important and they or to
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understand the colour the clinical
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interfaces and of the neurons oh very
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delighted to hear a talk because then
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you can say that we may get you know
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another field because it has been sort
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of a hindrance to progress in the in
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the theoretical side. But I also wanna
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pry open in your comment but well
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endurance physiology and hell
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determined by its genes and proteins
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and proteins halfway systems biology
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I'm so that's about fifty percent of
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what determines is young together the
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other fifty percent is it in words and
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in neuroscience we have a horrible time
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modelling inputs to structures largely
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because the brain is actually one
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circuit. And we don't have a good model
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for the writing. So if we could
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understand as as dark as an nick was
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say mathematics the theory behind the
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neurons but announcer adapting
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themselves to support we could model
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doesn't put maybe a better job of
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understanding autism original diseases
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et cetera yes. I was thinking that have
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been sitting here a hundred years ago
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while listening to you you would
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probably have been talking about
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technology and thus saving but okay
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today we can make sure the length of
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the nose and the size of the scroll and
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we can create that you have a criminal
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criminal mine this was healthy what's
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right and not you know getting there
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where you have been stopping to have
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you know nobody but you can look into
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the brain to like you have a criminal
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might have decided that you would be if
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you imprisonment for what we call to
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read about case who's about would have
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this kind of information and also to
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the way that you can use it as an
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excuse for not doing anything because
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it's too. It's hard I am I right or can
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use it against other people say you
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don't have a job so we will go with
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you. I think these are things which
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yeah so really the maybe just there is
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for phonology that a lot of people in
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the functional brain imaging or
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practise yeah we wanna know what the
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activation pattern is there someone
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like disease they someone under
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particular kind of challenge of like
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find part of the brain seems more
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active than a the the most people just
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say one means that part's active in
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this process I think that's the side of
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the we gotta understand that part in
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some mechanistic way we're gonna have
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an understanding of the mechanism or
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whatever it is we're talking about so
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for example what we study couple years
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ago on a low medium and high
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psychology. And looking at memorise the
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C and "'cause" results of addresses
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"'cause" I cycle we people who score
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really really high as like having scale
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have a high incidence of real rest yeah
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people have low score let's see so
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people wanna president people want an L
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well I think we can you tell us
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something "'cause" we're just kinda
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yes. It's the who let out you know and
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we do not presently if we is our
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capacity to make that prediction well
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turns out and yeah people will high so
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it's like a it's like I think sports
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that have a particular activation
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particular. So careless work. And then
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the lawyers say well that's cute but
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you numerical system integration legal
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system if you increase the probability
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that they'll have the now there'll be
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wrested from say sixty percent eighty
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percent of legal system is built says
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that we give you that twenty percent
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chance to behave. So basically we're
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not gonna use your data anyway even
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though we have time to probability
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through this correlation between
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something but we're not want. I mean
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that that's where things are that's it
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what was that one here and then just
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yeah I think you don't look at
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something that was amazing inspiring
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lecture so we get also from also have a
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question so it in all the that
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processing. And all the data and rely
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on on you know obtaining data in a
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laboratory environment where you know
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in Bowie a you know very complicated
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environments and and resources I
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exactly spacey you know devices or in
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some in some something. But you know we
00:16:04
are aware that you know the right
00:16:05
technology using clues these days the
00:16:07
little one or a little more you double
00:16:10
methods that are smaller. But they have
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a possibility of ski acquisition of
00:16:15
data must say and what was your
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question I I want to ask you you know
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but I see progress in that direction I
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think like the fact that some of you
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know kind of remote or so ready to to
00:16:30
to magically function gonna be you know
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may seem consumer that that's gonna be
00:16:34
a big transformation you know
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everybody's business is gonna yeah
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basically I mean base. So so we have
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starting to you got also not only we
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train margins but also with brain
00:16:45
stimulation even devices heating
00:16:47
consumers and in the hands of
00:16:49
everybody. So you know for your role
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perspective times see progress in that
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direction how excited or unexciting you
00:16:57
are really value thoughts on that what
00:17:01
producing those other methods we play
00:17:03
in how you know we're not of the brain
00:17:05
and come with the transform their
00:17:07
relationship between brands society
00:17:10
that bring line with to our mainstream
00:17:13
yeah if there are signs our budget
00:17:24
count as they don't really know the
00:17:27
next question asks six they can narrow
00:17:31
it down a little bit of the net. that's
00:17:34
not enters their fifteen or side as
00:17:37
they are fifty next questions to to
00:17:40
test. So the the difficulty with
00:17:43
zeroing in on me he knows keep
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methodology is it stuff and so what
00:17:50
happens is you see you see a broad
00:17:52
range of approaches so people want the
00:17:54
big data analysis approach people want
00:17:57
in independence scientists working it
00:18:00
is particular area maybe they'll come
00:18:02
up with some ideal have a general
00:18:05
principle I don't I mean I think that's
00:18:08
a change another huge scientific
00:18:12
societies and approaches that really we
00:18:16
don't do that I'm a big science and big
00:18:18
data that's sounds going to be bands.
00:18:20
And they're gonna find out why he
00:18:22
answers. And mysteriously consistency
00:18:25
what's the question here. What was
00:18:27
because they've got all kinds of things
00:18:29
are some really a problem by the by by
00:18:32
analysing these big database that's one
00:18:34
approach people like it use a big big
00:18:37
movement in that direction everybody
00:18:39
knows. But there's also a hard core
00:18:42
people who want individuals I
00:18:44
distinctly thinking of terms of the
00:18:46
specific question the particular model.
00:18:49
And I I like that too I I I and I don't
00:18:53
think there's any answers I I just
00:18:54
think it's one would hope there's about
00:18:57
three source of both of these four
00:19:00
we're not like some feels that knows
00:19:02
what the next question okay the whole
00:19:09
thing you might especially for this
00:19:11
story. a raw which we choose for
00:19:16
everything can you know the on the
00:19:19
young And this like the reality you and
00:19:23
that is what the mechanisms are
00:19:25
effectively can you don't know well the
00:19:30
the the quickest reuse that when the
00:19:35
give must but grey work was worse for
00:19:38
research Q later in this timeframe
00:19:41
nineteen sixty one it was so dramatic
00:19:45
to see that you could split them mind
00:19:48
people's still don't really grasp that
00:19:52
I mean I can take your mind turned into
00:19:54
two slices of and the fact that what
00:19:58
you think I mean how do you explain
00:20:01
that that still city as an issue in my
00:20:04
mind. But then what happen is that
00:20:06
there was this really patient yeah
00:20:10
oscillation as in the room I the
00:20:13
weather this once I didn't have any
00:20:15
idea what the other side was doing yeah
00:20:18
that was unbelievable once side was
00:20:21
talking to be all time on the other
00:20:23
side just pulling stuff off the shelf
00:20:25
thing where I would go. So that the
00:20:27
rice that cat and became way by SC with
00:20:34
the right side right yeah do this
00:20:37
rewrites right and I wrote paper
00:20:40
somewhere back there a cold rain don't
00:20:43
leave home without expensive I it's the
00:20:47
guy I you know the purses. And it has
00:20:50
all the other mechanisms of hypothesis
00:20:53
generation. And complex thinking and so
00:20:56
forth. So I think what's happened is
00:20:59
we're we're we're too the fact that
00:21:02
there are all kinds of interesting
00:21:03
things going on in the right right all
00:21:05
kinds of interesting things going to
00:21:07
that's right but it's in network with
00:21:09
that actually this is a nice I might
00:21:16
say into the next hard to Rebecca
00:21:20
strike where she is looking at the very
00:21:23
nature of some of the unique things at
00:21:25
the right atmosphere does. And and the
00:21:28
question would be what would happen if
00:21:30
you disconnected the bracelet right
00:21:32
patient with with that reveal itself
00:21:35
and the thinking better left hemisphere
00:21:38
facility the eighty on that you know
00:21:40
what it's like if we now split brain
00:21:42
experience experiments knowing. She's
00:21:45
about to tell you we would do a whole
00:21:47
different set of experiments too much
00:21:49
to chase yeah but so anyway that that
00:21:53
also I we belong there either we we was
00:21:59
that there's a lot of while our
00:22:00
organisation animal kingdom monkeys
00:22:04
that's or well and what happen is there
00:22:07
was a fight cortical space to develop
00:22:09
these other things language and speech.
00:22:13
And so what happens is the left
00:22:15
hemisphere that's basically is rapidly
00:22:19
use the whole somebody's right
00:22:20
hemisphere functions but what is their
00:22:22
language centres taken over. And the
00:22:24
asymmetry visit was due that that left
00:22:28
hemisphere so the corresponding a
00:22:32
mirror image areas that use also do the
00:22:35
right answers that it that that you
00:22:37
know so you could do language the the
00:22:39
resulting get this asymmetry that what
00:22:42
language and right is still it's
00:22:44
otherwise is that the right here in
00:22:45
something that the left it. So that
00:22:48
model it is the one on stick. yeah well
00:22:56
I'd like to thank you for lovely
00:22:58
introduction recently and we'll take a

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Conference Program

Introduction to the 12th Nestlé International Nutrition Symposium
Thomas Beck, NRC Director
22 Oct. 2015 · 8:57 a.m.
418 views
Introduction to Session I - Cognitive & Brain Development
Susan Gasser, Friedrich Miescher Institute, Basel, Switzerland
22 Oct. 2015 · 9:04 a.m.
The development of a healthy brain
Michael Gazzaniga, University of California, Santa Barbara, USA
22 Oct. 2015 · 9:16 a.m.
221 views
Q&A - The development of a healthy brain
Michael Gazzaniga, University of California, Santa Barbara, USA
22 Oct. 2015 · 9:56 a.m.
Early influences on brain development and epigenetics
Stephen G. Matthews, University of Toronto, Canada
22 Oct. 2015 · 10:49 a.m.
Q&A - Early influences on brain development and epigenetics
Stephen G. Matthews, University of Toronto, Canada
22 Oct. 2015 · 11:29 a.m.
Building the physiology of thought
Rebecca Saxe, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USA
22 Oct. 2015 · 11:38 a.m.
154 views
Q&A - Building the physiology of thought
Rebecca Saxe, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USA
22 Oct. 2015 · 12:10 p.m.
Introduction to Session II - Cognitive Decline
Kathinka Evers
22 Oct. 2015 · 2:02 p.m.
Brain health & brain diseases - future perspectives
Richard Frackowiak, CHUV University Hospital, Lausanne, Switzerland
22 Oct. 2015 · 2:11 p.m.
Alzheimer's disease: genome-wide clues for novel therapies
Rudolph E. Tanzi, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, USA
22 Oct. 2015 · 3:15 p.m.
Q&A - Alzheimer's disease: genome-wide clues for novel therapies
Rudolph E. Tanzi, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, USA
22 Oct. 2015 · 3:59 p.m.
Immunometabolic regulators of age-related inflammation
Vishwa D. Dixit, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, USA
22 Oct. 2015 · 4:21 p.m.
Q&A - Immunometabolic regulators of age-related inflammation
Vishwa D. Dixit, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, USA
22 Oct. 2015 · 4:59 p.m.
Introduction to Session III - Nutrition & Cognitive Development
Pierre Magistretti, KAUST, Thuwal, Saudi Arabia and EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland
23 Oct. 2015 · 9 a.m.
Energy metabolism in long-term memory formation and enhancement
Cristina M. Alberini, The Center for Neural Science, New York University, USA
23 Oct. 2015 · 9:16 a.m.
129 views
Q&A - Energy metabolism in long-term memory formation and enhancement
Cristina M. Alberini, The Center for Neural Science, New York University, USA
23 Oct. 2015 · 9:53 a.m.
Building the costly human brain: implications for the evolution of slow childhood growth and the origins of diabetes
Christopher Kuzawa, Northwestern University, Evanston, USA
23 Oct. 2015 · 10:29 a.m.
Q&A - Building the costly human brain: implications for the evolution of slow childhood growth and the origins of diabetes
Christopher Kuzawa, Northwestern University, Evanston, USA
23 Oct. 2015 · 10:57 a.m.
Nutrition, growth and the developing brain
Prof. Maureen Black, University of Maryland, School of Medicine, Baltimore, USA
23 Oct. 2015 · 11:09 a.m.
Q&A - Nutrition, growth and the developing brain
Prof. Maureen Black, University of Maryland, School of Medicine, Baltimore, USA
23 Oct. 2015 · 11:49 a.m.
Introduction to Session IV - Decline & Nutritional Intervention
Tamas Bartfai, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, USA
23 Oct. 2015 · 12:48 p.m.
On multi-domain approaches for prevention trials
Miia Kivipelto, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
23 Oct. 2015 · 1:04 p.m.
Q&A - On multi-domain approaches for prevention trials
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