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Oh wow or two so early on top of this
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is the whole matrix so I wanna say if
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you change Jesse you get this much
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reduction change just because once
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production surely you can now go back
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their files aspects you know and if
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you're initially US obviously can't why
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we have a certain amount of money. So
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we there are those in which is biggest
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one Yeah I question we have not yet
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check how big clock different
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components not explaining you may have
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be challenging to do that you
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absolutely want to try to see can we
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somehow and you know if you make this
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value the table what I sold you a all
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the population actually put up of risks
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at that much the cruel on a per maybe
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you remember that no education a small
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that if you think globally pack high
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value in this country is absolutely
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physical activity that has a high just
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one when we check that part. but from
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what we're yeah I I also got it from
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the segments of data such what's that
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ask you might a difficult question I
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have D do you think do you get if we
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had a very fashions oh my god might we
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actually they have a few about how much
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this something that was more affected
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that's I think it was and how far that
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point to go. I mean I say a couple of
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is that life. But call today and
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maintain something something like you
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if you have if you I mean I think if we
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are thinking prevention embroiled be a
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kind of interventions what they showed
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you know a cold in a way that this is
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something that can be easily
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implemented without side effects you
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don't take so much streets but more we
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are moving a or support them or in in
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the bus even more specific treatments
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is getting more difficult than there so
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probably so that it's difficult to know
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what is there but I think many process
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one to add maintain the combination but
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at the same time is important. It's not
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only combination is the quality of life
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is the functional capacity as well. So
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if I think a sensitive balance there
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how how happy and if I'm thinking the
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new trials they have like the in
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perceived and it's it's really yeah
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maybe combining more he's he's he's
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he's important. It's important also
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just on the use of the patience isn't
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that something what we are doing we are
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having a lot of call programs that
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really trying to involve patience
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because we want to know what they want
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what type of trial somewhat tripe
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interventions on it Is a cult interview
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thank you very much. So yeah for this
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work that you done for so many years in
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this big that the I manipulate on the
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on the board that if you so I think we
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should for me I think is should be a
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difference between statistical
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significance it you shown and the
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clinical significance critical. And the
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significance can be measured different
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way so it's not just the the risk
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reduction which is important for me but
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I think the effects I should be
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measured in terms of the delay in the
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fonts. So for me I think that it's not
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really a that you were gonna say you
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that every okay the the chance of
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developing the major is lower but it I
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think you nobody can really argue that
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what you were doing completely apology
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the the a risk of developing a major
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even in the study that you so no or
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that you're referring to the of the
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reduction in the incidence of them into
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a recently this is of separating by the
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fact that more people with old age and
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therefore even in these countries where
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there is really reduction in the
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incidence it but preference of the
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manager. We because of the increase so
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I think it's important to to talk about
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yeah they're talking about the you
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mentioned the immediately by Winston
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and you were that you were talking
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about the use of so many out of this
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where but cardiovascular risk factors
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are very important preventable a
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responsible for the development of the
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next year. So my question whether your
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intervention will more likely to be
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helpful in those people were they
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hiding cardiovascular risk then the out
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and I think this can tell us something
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about the possibly future to yeah about
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size is a second question because and
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we know I I think there should be a
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more in the pretty on the probably
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callipers you know we know even a small
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change is ED they are more long think
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that had a big effect of the population
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how to take that on the individual
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label is more more difficult but I
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think we need to be realistic special
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the first estimate if we can even
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delayed onset by five or ten years that
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would have use effect on that on the
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air or the society but I think again at
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the individual level is more difficult
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to say what ideas. And there is already
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a variation normally only show to you
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they intended tree analysis but inside
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intervention group persons would be not
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do as much as we want it so we also
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wanted on the lights for that these
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data to get more concrete is it makes
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about the about the effects. And all
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the effect of the intervention for the
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possible not we have not seen any clear
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de France in we take but it demands the
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risk or if you had a find you all all
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about you even the individual what's
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more effective so at the moment it
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seems to be C Miller for the for at
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target population of what we had what
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we what you do some more what I see
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thank use a little more a higher rate
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context exactly functions may indicate
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that it's possible responsible job yeah
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and I would be yeah and I would be
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surprised if if this would not be there
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because these are the major I lost
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reversal candle than you Yeah I thought
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that was just a command in the library
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where we are pretty sure we or the
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mothers of young or we maybe we
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complained. And we and we have one more
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thing intervention with three off and
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got millions of two we are about to to
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show that see I was finished quality
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time not only improve could be
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functional yes that we make give them
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an individual because of the market
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competition mental no intervention
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between must you could do to prevent
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yeah yeah yeah and I think it's very
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interesting finding a support again
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concept and expands findings I think
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you know for all the more for a
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population so I think it will be ready
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with the studies that say we should
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really bright more consensus of or
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recommendations what's not know what
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the different a construct first all
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comments for major point the population
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is living or and it's a little longer
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and speak always public health measures
00:07:41
of the kind that you've shown so like
00:07:43
now waited describe original all who
00:07:46
first point that out smoking is the
00:07:48
cancer and the I thought and that's the
00:07:52
reason the population that so much
00:07:54
longer because oh but I think this your
00:07:57
studies is directly you se exactly.
00:08:01
okay yeah maybe you can you go and
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there's no phone on from what the stuff
00:08:10
on that is the morning and what would
00:08:12
you would remain you have all the data
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from your own stereo from others I
00:08:19
don't know but probably got in there
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you don't you know we got in there why
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not populated that unfunded look for
00:08:27
respond with not a ritalin although you
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numbers are I you know so and so with
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one of the numbers on using more
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density yeah that's a good point that's
00:08:40
exactly what we aim to do. So we are
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collecting samples and we will when we
00:08:44
put together we have even larger
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samples that's why I think the multi
00:08:48
nation that collaboration is important
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that we have enough samples. So we we
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are doing more inflammatory metabolic
00:08:55
markers cholesterol everything we we
00:08:57
came to find the responders non
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responders that's the next step what we
00:09:01
would I don't know I bet you are in a
00:09:05
bar for what she someone to prepare one
00:09:08
last stops. But it's not worse. I want
00:09:11
my whole house also for that but we

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Conference Program

Introduction to the 12th Nestlé International Nutrition Symposium
Thomas Beck, NRC Director
22 Oct. 2015 · 8:57 a.m.
418 views
Introduction to Session I - Cognitive & Brain Development
Susan Gasser, Friedrich Miescher Institute, Basel, Switzerland
22 Oct. 2015 · 9:04 a.m.
The development of a healthy brain
Michael Gazzaniga, University of California, Santa Barbara, USA
22 Oct. 2015 · 9:16 a.m.
221 views
Q&A - The development of a healthy brain
Michael Gazzaniga, University of California, Santa Barbara, USA
22 Oct. 2015 · 9:56 a.m.
Early influences on brain development and epigenetics
Stephen G. Matthews, University of Toronto, Canada
22 Oct. 2015 · 10:49 a.m.
Q&A - Early influences on brain development and epigenetics
Stephen G. Matthews, University of Toronto, Canada
22 Oct. 2015 · 11:29 a.m.
Building the physiology of thought
Rebecca Saxe, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USA
22 Oct. 2015 · 11:38 a.m.
154 views
Q&A - Building the physiology of thought
Rebecca Saxe, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USA
22 Oct. 2015 · 12:10 p.m.
Introduction to Session II - Cognitive Decline
Kathinka Evers
22 Oct. 2015 · 2:02 p.m.
Brain health & brain diseases - future perspectives
Richard Frackowiak, CHUV University Hospital, Lausanne, Switzerland
22 Oct. 2015 · 2:11 p.m.
Alzheimer's disease: genome-wide clues for novel therapies
Rudolph E. Tanzi, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, USA
22 Oct. 2015 · 3:15 p.m.
Q&A - Alzheimer's disease: genome-wide clues for novel therapies
Rudolph E. Tanzi, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, USA
22 Oct. 2015 · 3:59 p.m.
Immunometabolic regulators of age-related inflammation
Vishwa D. Dixit, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, USA
22 Oct. 2015 · 4:21 p.m.
Q&A - Immunometabolic regulators of age-related inflammation
Vishwa D. Dixit, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, USA
22 Oct. 2015 · 4:59 p.m.
Introduction to Session III - Nutrition & Cognitive Development
Pierre Magistretti, KAUST, Thuwal, Saudi Arabia and EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland
23 Oct. 2015 · 9 a.m.
Energy metabolism in long-term memory formation and enhancement
Cristina M. Alberini, The Center for Neural Science, New York University, USA
23 Oct. 2015 · 9:16 a.m.
129 views
Q&A - Energy metabolism in long-term memory formation and enhancement
Cristina M. Alberini, The Center for Neural Science, New York University, USA
23 Oct. 2015 · 9:53 a.m.
Building the costly human brain: implications for the evolution of slow childhood growth and the origins of diabetes
Christopher Kuzawa, Northwestern University, Evanston, USA
23 Oct. 2015 · 10:29 a.m.
Q&A - Building the costly human brain: implications for the evolution of slow childhood growth and the origins of diabetes
Christopher Kuzawa, Northwestern University, Evanston, USA
23 Oct. 2015 · 10:57 a.m.
Nutrition, growth and the developing brain
Prof. Maureen Black, University of Maryland, School of Medicine, Baltimore, USA
23 Oct. 2015 · 11:09 a.m.
Q&A - Nutrition, growth and the developing brain
Prof. Maureen Black, University of Maryland, School of Medicine, Baltimore, USA
23 Oct. 2015 · 11:49 a.m.
Introduction to Session IV - Decline & Nutritional Intervention
Tamas Bartfai, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, USA
23 Oct. 2015 · 12:48 p.m.
On multi-domain approaches for prevention trials
Miia Kivipelto, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
23 Oct. 2015 · 1:04 p.m.
Q&A - On multi-domain approaches for prevention trials
Miia Kivipelto, MD, PhD, Karolinska Institutet
23 Oct. 2015 · 1:39 p.m.
Methodological challenges in Alzheimer clinical development
Lon S. Schneider, Keck School of Medicine of USC, Los Angeles, USA
23 Oct. 2015 · 1:49 p.m.
Q&A - Methodological challenges in Alzheimer clinical development
Lon S. Schneider, Keck School of Medicine of USC, Los Angeles, USA
23 Oct. 2015 · 2:32 p.m.
We are what we remember: memory and age related memory disorders
Eric R. Kandel, Columbia University, New York, USA
23 Oct. 2015 · 3:03 p.m.
138 views
Concluding Remarks
Stefan Catsicas, Chief Technology Officer, Nestlé SA
23 Oct. 2015 · 3:50 p.m.

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Nestlé Institute of Health Sciences
Kei Sakamoto, Head of Diabetes & Circadian Rhythms
18 May 2016 · 3:59 p.m.
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