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In that whole Davis and then the other.
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And we won't know that that may be up
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box like nice right so it would be
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where they are but it's you that about
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clear benefits at that time did another
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buttons. So that Uh it's not what we
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aren't and number in that and and so is
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that a nice so is a option questions
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and moments please So then I just want
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to get away question chances lusty idea
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research thank you for that serve it oh
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and and brought comprehensive survey of
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this is you of treatments and and their
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times I wanna ask you know given that
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and what is the requirement after the
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trial and it's a hypothesis it's down
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to target for all the drugs that you
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you was it on that that very well yes
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like I want to know if if there are a
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outcomes that you common on not not
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obviously for clinical purposes because
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the clock on the desire this cognitive
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but in terms of the scientific basis
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for for these drugs and and they Emily
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is is the right really case in all of
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those trials that they don't know it is
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decrease and and how correlated is it
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with the cognitive a car a bunch of
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compound question so so yeah so the oh
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it will be decreased if you're using
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drugs that decreases the family. So it
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could it if it's an antibody towards
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soluble antibodies well that a soluble
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E bay well that may be really difficult
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to measure but an antibody against five
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Rolls can be can be measured so you can
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you can invent a drug and in fact the
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the the real reason roger roger niche
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tribe is really very colourful and
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knocking down by brawls okay but that's
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not necessarily a improving cognition.
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So I don't know if I dress that you
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question would get it definite drop it
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didn't attack family you wouldn't
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expect it to change at all because I
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think in terms of pet scans or or other
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ways of an you know correlating
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decrease and in in in the target with
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any type can change and if not what how
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how can we justify continuing to keep
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track of the target data. well you you
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can do just exactly that you can get
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before and after a family pet scans
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that's what we do a I'm not sure though
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that even when you have to draw the
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targets pipe roles and you're able to
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show that five girls that that the
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class or busted one that scans. And of
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course you showing a correlation with
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the with cognition obviously a slight
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change over time did you actually
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proving anything you're you just
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showing up a whole correlations so it
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depends really on the theory behind it
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if a theory isn't back that apply
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Buster is in and of itself as the the
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reason why you might have cognitive
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improvement then that's that's fine as
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you can tell by the way I've been
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answering and talking about this I I
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don't think the downward so personally
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much much of the park if you have you
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have a you know I don't know how long
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the low and you got to you it would be
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a a TV guide. It'll be seem to be going
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to say this is that is that we actually
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because we haven't see correlation or
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any correlation those people know
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anybody BC aside. And and he can't jobs
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away cognitive decline. So maybe that
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would probably be a bit a viable once
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we got three or four different clark's
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what do I think david. But none of them
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giving down that's what we it it. This
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is why I and much for that you are
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"'cause" that sometimes can inform I
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know it's not only a right of
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importance when there would the
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suitable or Superman So what is it also
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like just one think of your so with any
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seventeen ninety two with the with the
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data vaccine ah I john Marco goes of
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that paper an autopsy based paper in
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which you can make the inference that
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that vaccine actually was quite potent
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in that none of these none of these
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patients had substantial time allotted
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a and it was unlikely that none of them
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you know that that they were Emily
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that's into that all the more ammo it
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up to the baseline. So that might be an
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iguana an uncontrolled experiment ah ah
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possibly suggesting that died even
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removing a large amount of a family
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class was not associated with notable
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call Oh could you comment your comment
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on the fact that we have a guidelines
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do not take into account the age of the
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subjects because elderly people have a
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mean we are in many cases we've me an
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agreement simple. So the figure that
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every person does not needed this is
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related to the you know so long as I
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can usually comment on that you know
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NXT A.'s in there for a lot in this in
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this groups philosophy a of the of
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regulatory and guidance are tries to
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say as little as possible so that they
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can get away with not talking about age
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or gender or other aspects they will
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they will do that. But then as you're
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alluding I each is very very strongly
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associated with the with family and
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with with family plaques in in brains
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so depending on what age range you pick
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for clinical trial you're going to have
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a different bass three and a about
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family and also depending on the
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commenting on the proportion of people
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who are you going for our first okay in
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your assessment of the this state of
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various with the FDA I think clinical
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trial you you I generally small
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populations that maybe look yeah no
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they're not that I'm going to dynastic
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do you think that that the the FB
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prospective on this ecstatic with a
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couple of the phenomenon that's been
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mentioned here you times which is
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really pass give you base dementia yeah
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yeah yeah yeah there may not you know I
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said so so it'd be it'd be supportive
00:06:56
of the that day or regulatory agency
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they're doing as little as possible in
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an area that they can speak about which
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is sort of all seated alzheimer's
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disease. And they're silent on these
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more complicated areas such as mixed
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vascular disease where it's not clear
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whether when you have the mix the
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schema vascular disease whether any
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colour with these associated cognitive
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impairment is to do that or do the
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associated alzheimer's pathology as
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well. So don't tend to stay away from
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the uncertainties and especially when
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there's uncertainty in the field. But
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it for instance the field coalesce as
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as they have one on the match with
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really bodies it's pretty
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straightforward if if it if it's able
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to call that's on a clear diagnosis of
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GDP forty three really did a tautology
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or worshipping campus choruses it will
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all the feel it but it won't be the
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field the deny I'd nobody wants to
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leave this field yeah So thank you.
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Thank you for the target Lieberman C
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research I was intrigued by buddy for
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trial the feel screenings seventy five
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percent yeah very positive yeah it is a
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major issue in that right oh so how or
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the cutoffs for the for the family that
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can see so they need to cut off I make
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I make it mission of what is a positive
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and what that what we saw in this study
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it is a visual it's a visual read based
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on based on the prescribed based on the
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on the on the package insert
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information and based on training
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radiologist to make the visual read in
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other studies a it can be a combination
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of the visual read with with a
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standardised a SUVR read how do you
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determine what the what areas you going
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to put into the SUVR a that that varies
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a bit somewhat arbitrary but it's
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usually based on the experience of the
00:09:05
people other people doing it the ratio
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itself in different studies could be
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one point one one point two other some
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degree of arbitrariness but in eighty
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four it was meant to be it was meant to
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reflect a clinical so that S well no no
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no no no walls because that inside
00:09:28
reality steel or is actually Oh well
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that is well yeah I don't know about
00:09:36
that it's legally I'd be simple and we
00:09:40
should be trivial people not to
00:09:42
antiques shop and we brilliant well two

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Conference Program

Introduction to the 12th Nestlé International Nutrition Symposium
Thomas Beck, NRC Director
22 Oct. 2015 · 8:57 a.m.
418 views
Introduction to Session I - Cognitive & Brain Development
Susan Gasser, Friedrich Miescher Institute, Basel, Switzerland
22 Oct. 2015 · 9:04 a.m.
The development of a healthy brain
Michael Gazzaniga, University of California, Santa Barbara, USA
22 Oct. 2015 · 9:16 a.m.
221 views
Q&A - The development of a healthy brain
Michael Gazzaniga, University of California, Santa Barbara, USA
22 Oct. 2015 · 9:56 a.m.
Early influences on brain development and epigenetics
Stephen G. Matthews, University of Toronto, Canada
22 Oct. 2015 · 10:49 a.m.
Q&A - Early influences on brain development and epigenetics
Stephen G. Matthews, University of Toronto, Canada
22 Oct. 2015 · 11:29 a.m.
Building the physiology of thought
Rebecca Saxe, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USA
22 Oct. 2015 · 11:38 a.m.
154 views
Q&A - Building the physiology of thought
Rebecca Saxe, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USA
22 Oct. 2015 · 12:10 p.m.
Introduction to Session II - Cognitive Decline
Kathinka Evers
22 Oct. 2015 · 2:02 p.m.
Brain health & brain diseases - future perspectives
Richard Frackowiak, CHUV University Hospital, Lausanne, Switzerland
22 Oct. 2015 · 2:11 p.m.
Alzheimer's disease: genome-wide clues for novel therapies
Rudolph E. Tanzi, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, USA
22 Oct. 2015 · 3:15 p.m.
Q&A - Alzheimer's disease: genome-wide clues for novel therapies
Rudolph E. Tanzi, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, USA
22 Oct. 2015 · 3:59 p.m.
Immunometabolic regulators of age-related inflammation
Vishwa D. Dixit, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, USA
22 Oct. 2015 · 4:21 p.m.
Q&A - Immunometabolic regulators of age-related inflammation
Vishwa D. Dixit, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, USA
22 Oct. 2015 · 4:59 p.m.
Introduction to Session III - Nutrition & Cognitive Development
Pierre Magistretti, KAUST, Thuwal, Saudi Arabia and EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland
23 Oct. 2015 · 9 a.m.
Energy metabolism in long-term memory formation and enhancement
Cristina M. Alberini, The Center for Neural Science, New York University, USA
23 Oct. 2015 · 9:16 a.m.
129 views
Q&A - Energy metabolism in long-term memory formation and enhancement
Cristina M. Alberini, The Center for Neural Science, New York University, USA
23 Oct. 2015 · 9:53 a.m.
Building the costly human brain: implications for the evolution of slow childhood growth and the origins of diabetes
Christopher Kuzawa, Northwestern University, Evanston, USA
23 Oct. 2015 · 10:29 a.m.
Q&A - Building the costly human brain: implications for the evolution of slow childhood growth and the origins of diabetes
Christopher Kuzawa, Northwestern University, Evanston, USA
23 Oct. 2015 · 10:57 a.m.
Nutrition, growth and the developing brain
Prof. Maureen Black, University of Maryland, School of Medicine, Baltimore, USA
23 Oct. 2015 · 11:09 a.m.
Q&A - Nutrition, growth and the developing brain
Prof. Maureen Black, University of Maryland, School of Medicine, Baltimore, USA
23 Oct. 2015 · 11:49 a.m.
Introduction to Session IV - Decline & Nutritional Intervention
Tamas Bartfai, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, USA
23 Oct. 2015 · 12:48 p.m.
On multi-domain approaches for prevention trials
Miia Kivipelto, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
23 Oct. 2015 · 1:04 p.m.
Q&A - On multi-domain approaches for prevention trials
Miia Kivipelto, MD, PhD, Karolinska Institutet
23 Oct. 2015 · 1:39 p.m.
Methodological challenges in Alzheimer clinical development
Lon S. Schneider, Keck School of Medicine of USC, Los Angeles, USA
23 Oct. 2015 · 1:49 p.m.
Q&A - Methodological challenges in Alzheimer clinical development
Lon S. Schneider, Keck School of Medicine of USC, Los Angeles, USA
23 Oct. 2015 · 2:32 p.m.
We are what we remember: memory and age related memory disorders
Eric R. Kandel, Columbia University, New York, USA
23 Oct. 2015 · 3:03 p.m.
138 views
Concluding Remarks
Stefan Catsicas, Chief Technology Officer, Nestlé SA
23 Oct. 2015 · 3:50 p.m.

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