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they are welcome to this a session on shared cities
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uh my name is pedigree never caught a i'm going to be the moderator for this session here
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uh i just like to probably a little bit i give a little bit of practical
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information what we're gonna have no we're gonna have a presentation first of all
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a walmart somebody's gonna come a station presents we can have a little q. and a afterwards or
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thought i could we best to be cured a in addition to microphones in the audience
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i'm giving you the opportunity if you think the question during the presentation
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you can send your question to me why s. m. s. i thought that would be really easy
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way to do it so if you make a note to this number on the screen
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if you have any questions during the presentation which could remain anonymous you
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don't have to say who you are you don't want to
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or you could say who you are then you send the question to me via s. m. s.
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depending on how many questions we get during the session i'll pick the best
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one sites or a couple of those out when we get to body
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to ask all of them with a sentence we have uh be the easiest
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way to do it actually okay everybody made notes of the number
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text message simple text sorry where you are are you send me text there everybody setting latex leather
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yeah you from uh you from the netherlands plus thirty one that's you get it works at
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it works okay good let's kick off a am i yes i have a question for
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you it's a look next slide here how many of you have a drill
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how many of you own a drill fish for making out
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how much do you use that room
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mm how often you use the true i thought about how i haven't read a home uh i so far
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this year i really have to think also for this year of use that drove four hours in here
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and the war and and in here we got a size seven sixty hours
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so it you know kindest basically self explanatory i
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don't really use that drove very much um
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so look next one here the thing about it is that you don't really need the drill
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you just need a hole in the wall uh_huh and it's one of those things that we
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hardly ever use i've got a car at home is not as bad as the trio
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but my car sits in the garage a lot or whatever got a call that six unlike arouse a lot though
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right the reason bring this is because this is sort of
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the driving philosophy behind the shared ocean sharing a
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colour but you know how can we better make use of those resources we have today in the world
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there are approximately four billion people living in cities that's just over half the world's population
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uh we got the figures it but twenty fifty that population would have risen to six
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point five billion or more important sixty six percent of the what like twenty fifty
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two thirds of the world would be living in cities so obviously raises a number of challenges one
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of them is with so many people around we call continue to consume the way we do
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it also means that with so much concentration
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of urban people in the world
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we have the challenge of live ability uh_huh how do we keep those cities being livable
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it also means that was so much organisation cities will be competing against each other
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try to compete for the resources because sixty six of the popular world's population
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is also sixty six percent of the potential talent in the world living right the cities
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so this will call for fresh way of thinking uh a collaborative way of thinking the pull your
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resources and sharing as well as our next speaker is gonna touch on some of these subjects
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cities sharing a colour may live ability that when i first read about or speak it
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i was coming on stage thing that struck me was his journey they started life
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in new york now lives in prague he's a landscape architect to know runs an n. g. o.
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uh is the founder recycled restoration that explores the
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power of life events sharing economy concepts
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it's actually so really looking forward to this talk was of please give
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a warm welcome to is that martin barre the stages yours
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oh
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ah
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wow
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more
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ah
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or
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wow uh_huh okay thanks for that great introduction and whoever
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body and martin barre yeah this is a
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film that was just shown at the um los angeles film festival for newer present phones
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and it's a it's a film the really speaks to what we care about every side so i'm going to ask everyone to start by standing up
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around stand up sailor which other how many of you know each other before you
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came into this room if you don't say hello tell them where you're from
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and for my own art stay standing any should sit down and
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so and so you can answer yes to question the first
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without sitting down i wanna know however once from because we had a hard time understanding demographics of
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the room so uh let's start with the easy one raise your hand if you're from europe
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a lot of people here okay let's go to asia is from asia a couple of people the middle east
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no one africa a couple people wanted zero okay south america i know on and then north america
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a couple of people okay corner stay stay standing now the divisor park last
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weekend if you visit the park indicates your partner you can sit down
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no i want to okay a few people is the part great will make use of your city and what
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about today i had to get here the dreaded like if you're a bike you can sit down
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no cyclist to people okay gonna checker bikes outside
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did you drive now everyone still standing to taking over or taxi
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few people that's okay whoever's okay did you walk
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a lot of people walking probably stay nearby about a trainer public transit the rest you probably type trainer public
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transit some people didn't have violated you brush your teeth this morning if you did you can sit down
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all these issues that we just for talked about that we sat down for that we interacted with
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the parts of the city even brushing your teeth the water delivery systems
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infrastructure the gets into your home or your apartment or a hotel
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room me i generally take a bike today is a little too cold i was in a rush so i didn't take my bike
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a little bit of background about myself and i will get into some the core issues about what we care about including sharing
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my family's from here most wife i was born on this property in ireland
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we ended up here in new york that's where i spend most the better part of my thirty years
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um and so i want to get some space and spell reno said
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i i'd i'd transfer i migrated from from york into prague
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and ended up in this beautiful city i came here for nine months went back to new york
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in the meantime my non profit but i start i was doing well so i moved back your prague some bass full time in prague
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i'm a landscape architect and i care about cities in primarily i care
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about creating laudable cities ratings a city that we can really love
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pay attention to all the details of the things we like about everyday life in the
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city which for me includes public space in the public realm of the city
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everything outside your front door outside of work that's what i care about in cities
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and i care about shaping in implementing new kinds of projects new pilots
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you know in collaboration with other people across disciplines to create better cities three focus
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on pilots and initiatives i like to help c. d.'s and companies and corporations
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reach new and more agile markets and primarily
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reusing collaboration in order to enable cities
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never in order to enable cities to take best advantage what they have
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to attract new talent to attract new business and use design is the way to do
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that the designing a better more livable level city that's what i care about
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why cities city generate like seventy percent of global g. d. p. m.
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sixty percent of that comes from just six hundred urban centres are
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about sixty percent of all urban dwellers are going to be under the age of eighteen by twenty thirty
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well you know just told us really gets that we should know
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about twenty fifty almost seventy percent overall population live in cities
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a lot of those will be young people who to think about how to design a c. d. for the next generation
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rage fifty one percent of twenty five to thirty four year olds this in the us
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the fifty one percent more like a little bit within five k. about three miles from the c.
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b. d. that's the central business district people i think in my generation and thirty eight
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so everyone in my generation of all i think we wanna live in the heart
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of cities wanna look close to work what's gonna have a nice commute
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spend more time with their families and spend more time at the office it's generally and we want to spend more time in our neighbour it's so when we
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think about citizen developing cities designing them with think about how to create a
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nice environment for people a hundred percent of all college educated u. k.
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concord no one else they live in large and medium size cities every single one of what they wanna live in the heart of the city
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it's about the next generation this is my next generation hidden is five months old
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he's wearing a wrist band from our our conference in june so it was the youngest participant or event
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and i show him because really i decisions become very personal for me right it's a very personal topic
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it used to be that we talked about creating c. d.'s for the next generation that was very abstract it's the right thing to do but now it's very
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personal because in twenty twenty five there's only thirteen million more people would more children
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in two point three more households or we're gonna be having less kids
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but in in smaller that's family is some like or units
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different places to live different kinds apartment's really more
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poured in the future department of mid century twenty centuries not necessarily wanna be living in twenty fifty
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we need to think about not just the x. terra environment but also her redesign housing
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to make it more affordable and make it more efficient for the twenty first century family
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do we think about public space we try to find examples like in paris
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there's the global leader in putting the other public and private initiative
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to utilise open space as an economic and cultural driver
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the public space can be can not just the place for people to relax and enjoy
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but the really important cultural aspect of the city that attracts investment so
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we try to rethink public space what what i can mean
00:13:12
for cities pairs are doing a great job new york in the last ten or fifteen years if you've been to new york
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you've probably seen a lot of urban transformation in new york city time square is one of those places that
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we look to is a good example time square used to be pretty awful when i was growing
00:13:26
up not a place we want a bigger family uh_huh but now it's a completely different different situation in
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the first year the traffic was closed streets were
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close to to automobiles became primarily pedestrian space
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there's a hundred percent higher and seventy percent increase in retail revenue
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in the same here this is about four five years ago
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there's a two hundred percent increase in rents and that area which is usually a good thing for business but
00:13:55
it also these kind of initiatives we also have to be careful of us are also studying this in presenting it
00:14:01
therefore abilities becoming a major problem it's a large large cities and this is a problem
00:14:06
from when you're generations especially when wages are not raising rising real estate values are
00:14:11
you you said have a weight problem you start have with ability problems affordability something we're focusing on two thousand eighteen trying to
00:14:17
figure out the most of the the best solutions for affordable housing in keeping series that informal rate for most people
00:14:24
but also write a big market opportunity so just as an example about affordability in brooklyn where i
00:14:29
spent at about ten years um fifty percent a rat race twenty two percent since nineteen ninety
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blames burger mike or community within broken this other rents race eighteen
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to twenty percent per year on average since two thousand eight
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that's a huge difference a lot of huge rent increase a lot of people can keep up with obviously salaries are increasing at the same rate uh_huh
00:14:51
so c. d.'s and we focus on season walk ability to focus
00:14:55
on affordability we focus on trying to keep places more livable
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and these are just abstract issues they will get a pedestrian cities who we think we talk about a
00:15:04
lot about turning more public space uh for pedestrians if they think about is a very personal issue
00:15:10
couples and which one part or commutes longer than forty five minutes before if percent more likely to
00:15:16
have a divorce so it's a big deal i kinda hits on people can think about that
00:15:21
and the around relationships i hope you're all together with your partners uh
00:15:24
any fancy is not one where even the pour use carter rather
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one or even the rich use public transit is the uh board member of ours we get penny was definitely got a mayor
00:15:34
uh talking about how cities need to be equitable right we need to provide better transportation options
00:15:40
so people get the working at home in a more efficient way but in a
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city like new york or paris or london or even singapore public transit
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is is a thing that everybody uses not just for not just the rich
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it's one was a girl for the transportation of done properly uh_huh
00:15:55
and we think like a society that grows great and uh when women or men plant
00:16:00
trees reshape the never sit in so it's like a much uh we live by
00:16:05
we talk about future generations not just hayden my son but his kits
00:16:10
we really want to design for those people you in in thinking about cities is hard because you have to think twenty thirty forty years in advance
00:16:16
which particularly now not many people used to be so i'll public space we love public
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space because it's a human story provides places were theatre for interactions between people
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it provides a the place or people meet 'em to negotiate you can be your part our public space
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uh any provides long term thinking like i just said twenty thirty forty
00:16:40
years to central park an eighteen fifty and such a parking eighty
00:16:45
fifty just give you example the kind of issues we talk about an
00:16:49
eighteen fifty six thirteen million dollars in that time was spent
00:16:54
to redevelop a central park at that time is a two hundred nine million dollar increase in real estate values so again it's
00:17:00
not just about public space in great opportunities for for people thought
00:17:04
about generating well for those around the public space but
00:17:08
another example this kind of uh uh invested in public space that that then
00:17:12
yield results in the private sector one point four billion was race
00:17:15
deprive a flat to be in new york city to drop a high wine is the picture the highland has been the highlight any actually
00:17:22
so how i was a public space project but it's become much more than that right it's become a place to meet
00:17:27
it's also become a place that to invest around it's become a place to eat
00:17:31
it's become a war that the biggest divorced uh draws in new york city
00:17:35
the public space has a really large impact not just on the economy but also cultural life in tourism life
00:17:42
so again we talk about city it's designs the design of the generational issue something we think long term
00:17:48
we think about this the boom in city centre living as you do business opportunity
00:17:52
and a quarter lab generally the catalyst lookup local economies by and i think like we we need partnerships
00:18:00
a lot of things we talk about is collaboration and stuff been ski in your city economic
00:18:05
development corporation talks about it this way it's best to look for areas with the private sector is
00:18:10
proven to be particularly innovative or areas where government is perjury proven to be particularly skull eric
00:18:16
those category a category good areas are right for partnership so we talk about
00:18:20
partnering with the private sector and the public sector in the civic sector
00:18:24
it's really good to find a partner that can make the project to make the uh sustainable
00:18:29
right a lot of times public private partnership to use civic sector were n. g. o.s
00:18:33
to have long term sustainability 'cause they care about what happens in that space usually
00:18:37
they're more connected emotionally that space evermore human connection to it that that's important
00:18:42
these kind of things that's another thing we talk about uh_huh i again another example from your city three hundred seventy million dollars in
00:18:50
public investment in breckenridge park uh about generates about three point or
00:18:54
a three point one nine dollars an an annual operations revenue
00:18:58
is eighty five acres of parkland one thousand residential units is is one of the best developments in your city
00:19:04
um and public space and residential development on the waterfront usually important
00:19:09
uh back to highlight four point four million annual visitors
00:19:13
and it has spurred three thirty three new construction projects so again public
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space the driver of many things including economy and we do
00:19:21
these things to become human we do these things to provide connections
00:19:24
particularly across public space because being human is the person relation
00:19:29
then from taipei uh_huh just a tidbit i an actor i learned about the mare taipei this platform results
00:19:37
also connection so is running on the platform of
00:19:39
love and happiness is providing tax incentives to
00:19:44
building owners to provide elevators in the building and why because older people the connection and when you're stuck
00:19:49
in a uh an apartment isn't the time for your alternate is harder you're not as more while
00:19:55
so your life span starts become shorter because you don can actually humans so buildings are now providing it at the current
00:20:01
time providing incentives for to build elevator so people can get out of their apartments in back in the city streets
00:20:06
in order to to go in order to see him relate other people for the very cities are very personal and they have to be
00:20:13
and they're enabling we love c. d.'s regular enable us to do these things they inspire ideas c. d.'s
00:20:19
are centres of innovation and their centres of innovation because we're close to other people good ideas
00:20:24
we're close other people with good business opportunities good cultural opportunities
00:20:29
and most importantly were closed other diverse cup cultures and we learn from that we learn a lot from it
00:20:34
this is my personal map in two thousand sixteen about ten months of two thousand sixteen
00:20:41
flying around the world in most of these places those fly because my my now wife to live in tokyo zero is meeting on
00:20:47
business trips we found opportunities to enable we enable ourselves to to me only in places where we could actually do business
00:20:54
so our map is very complicated relationship is even more complicated but we got
00:20:58
married last year in cities all in technology allowed to do that
00:21:02
mar technology modern infrastructure loud how not to get together
00:21:07
we want to now shimmer with the taipei most recently where lisbon by saddam
00:21:13
all these places we explore the opportunities the public space offered we explore the cultural into versus of the c. d.
00:21:20
in cities allow that they allow relationships to happen right without cities relationship never would've happened that any
00:21:25
york communicator for six years or seven years as friends when she was in tokyo in taipei
00:21:30
i moved to probably connect in something like eight cease and ten
00:21:34
months get married with a k. this is because the cities
00:21:39
they're enabling uh_huh really in a lot on this statement by mike bloomberg the former new york city
00:21:45
the need to be cool they need to be competitive i need to be in control
00:21:51
generally re say focuses a lot on being cool we think cities need to beep colour plays the be better
00:21:56
places to live we understand very clearly that the places that are cooler another nicer to live in
00:22:04
the more competitive they're going to attract more talon and they're gonna retain more people in the city
00:22:09
a more more cities need to be in control the it's a big inch in control their own destiny cities can't
00:22:16
drifted to the future the need to sell their very directly and we know how that can be done
00:22:23
so the organisation i stars an n. g. o. are
00:22:25
focused primarily are modus operandi is collaborative crap collaboration
00:22:31
we try to get all the parties they're thinking about c. d. design see planning together around one table
00:22:37
in one room to think about the most collaborative unsustainable solutions
00:22:41
or ideas can be shared in solutions can be shared
00:22:45
in order to make more sustainable city so reset x. the catalyst for innovative action and
00:22:50
for leadership were international platform to exchange ideas about making c. d.'s yes more livable
00:22:56
more competitive and more easily and i hereby nice world all the things we talked about just now that's
00:23:04
our playground we focus on public space on infrastructure mobility we focus on the share economy how sharing
00:23:10
is influencing the way in which we design and the way in which we live in cities
00:23:16
so again our vision every side is also person of it and we we
00:23:19
talk about the ability in love ability we talk about pilots in initiatives
00:23:23
we're trying to help people reach more agile markets were trying to enable cities to do better
00:23:29
these are the cities were working with we have projects in partners in prague
00:23:33
amsterdam parse along a berlin belgrade brought us level two cache to budapest
00:23:39
cut to the temple and london lisbon new york warsaw
00:23:43
and we're developing a partnership allowable dowdy urban planning council so these are places where working
00:23:50
over the last five years and i should say reset was found that doesn't and you go with nothing but an idea and a couple volunteers
00:23:57
uh we have a pretty big team based here in prague we've done a hundred and twenty five advance more or less in the last five years
00:24:04
with about four hundred the world's best experts uh come for advances in our network
00:24:08
uh we've attracted more or less ten thousand delegates or advance in
00:24:12
it may come or experts come from about fifty countries
00:24:15
so is the best people in the world architecture planning politics investment in civic activism
00:24:22
some apart as we worked with that you probably know ever been be of y'all yeah which is a kind of global environmental services company
00:24:28
a philips uh the atlantic the media or media partner uh
00:24:32
the weight and also petr investments are local partner here
00:24:36
so again five and a half years more last uh we're presenting strategies are
00:24:40
presenting ideas for presenting projects were collaborating with top little thought leaders
00:24:45
on their designs and on innovative approaches to snaking cities better places to live in work
00:24:50
um we try to identify trends we try to identify solutions which often can come from very diverse places
00:24:57
so we share those trends in we share those solutions with their audiences via
00:25:01
media and the events uh and the uh uh partnerships in an advisory
00:25:06
uh and we try to help the cities uh sort of focus on civic innovation in order to improve
00:25:11
their their place and or two blues specific places within their cities and uh we think that reside
00:25:19
often times and even telegram was going to say yeah i'd like to introduce it
00:25:22
as as an event organisers or say non landscape architect a very sensitive about
00:25:26
that yeah we become very good at organising events uh uh i won't lie about
00:25:30
that but uh we we see reset is more of a a catalyst
00:25:35
right it's a place people come for ideas we advise c. d.'s we advise how the clients we in price exactly clients
00:25:42
um and we use the the the the big conference so we we do primarily it's a conference for twelve hundred people
00:25:48
more or less will probably be bigger this year uh but we do that to to sort of present the ideas into getting
00:25:54
it moving and that's just really a platform to get things moving to get people around one stage in altogether one place
00:26:00
it's often controversial to get everyone in one place right developers
00:26:03
don't often like activists right the developers always say
00:26:06
in the in the private sector always says what you have those con is presenting on the stage
00:26:11
you know and and then the the socialist or left to say why
00:26:14
you parser developers investors so nature people are more more used to
00:26:17
separating their ideas in living in bubbles we're trying to bring them together
00:26:21
with all the digital and physical platform to bring people together
00:26:25
and we see it as a wake allies local action local culture and local calming so we're doing a just
00:26:33
events for professionals we do lots of events for the public and and uh and sort of civic sector
00:26:38
this is again we organise for six hundred people about planning needs a new type of city a
00:26:43
lot for better immigration policies so with six enter people playing at fifteen different game boards
00:26:49
and you had to be if you were in private life or in your professional life you're an architect
00:26:54
then you weren't allowed to play the architect in the game you have to put yourself in someone else's shoes you have to be
00:26:58
an investor activist or fewer mare you had been architect you have
00:27:02
to think how some else would think when planning the city
00:27:05
this is one of the the this is the biggest get urban planning units everyone played here is like
00:27:10
but people are networks ages recap any los the mayor but go to settle down in one of the
00:27:15
world's best architects and engineers uh with the mouse you probably saw his library just presented um
00:27:23
and is done all the design platforms in china this is hang over
00:27:26
ink who's one of the global expert some water management climate change
00:27:31
mm car wise brought from your c. planning i'm sure a lot of men but actually we have a fifty
00:27:35
percent over speakers are women uh this is neat long designer of mike or housing in new york city
00:27:41
maybe so micro houses that are being built in your city is a new model for future living
00:27:45
i mean is what the author of that um michael coleman off of a architecture
00:27:50
critic many are times so ascii assassin or talks about immigration angles nation
00:27:56
calm university and again be mass so the the typical vendor reset has a sort of highly specific about cities
00:28:03
uh one core parading in all the aspects that are they're involved in city making particular in collaboration and sharing we organise
00:28:10
pipe private and public dinners events um we had about a
00:28:13
thousand people are recent dinner for celebrating a infrastructure
00:28:17
and we worked tirelessly decree one of a kind experiences for visitors
00:28:22
so who calms the the these uh activities mayors ministers developers architects
00:28:27
city counsellors economists entrepreneur is primarily from the tech sector
00:28:31
social innovators n. g. o.s from our sector a pride it's it's
00:28:36
it's a regular citizens people just care about the city
00:28:39
oh they're coming uh we have ecologists anthropologist engineers city planners
00:28:45
uh it's a makers you know people are inspired to build their steve by themselves
00:28:49
people starting cafes or or or temporary parks things like that those are kind of people are coming to our advance
00:28:57
it's quite a large that that quite a large group uh we attract people
00:29:00
from about thirty or forty countries at each event that we do uh_huh
00:29:05
and like i said the that people are coming mostly from across sectors which is very uncommon won lots of events right
00:29:10
we usually come from the same sector we hear from the same types of people were trying to cross breed that
00:29:16
i attended has grown we uh our first uh that was about four hundred people we've grown to over twelve hundred people
00:29:22
are are flexible than we have many small dance around this as well organisational growth is expanded quite a lot
00:29:29
every cypress together extraordinary first rate speakers as well as an amazing audience of people who love season we think it
00:29:36
we think like a movable city right we tried it in case everyone from different sectors
00:29:41
and is the maelstrom of human counters want brilliant and civic minded this is not me is edward later from a harvard university
00:29:46
economist um who wrote a book about sees recently is very high publish what do we do this in for whom
00:29:54
we're doing it because we wanna make impact all soft one cities to change the
00:29:58
way they think cease to change the way they act in building cities
00:30:03
uh and we want people carry the message you know we want people
00:30:06
be inspired to the events through the the activities to the media
00:30:10
so that they could they themselves can be in urban uh so if anyone goes home and talks about transportation
00:30:15
we talk about how was dangerous to cross the street you've just become an organised you've just become or urban
00:30:20
designer because you're talking about how bad the transportation was you identified a problem in the c. process
00:30:26
think everyone has a role play in redesign or city everyone has a role
00:30:29
play to communicate with their counsellors to communicate with their c. is
00:30:33
and private sector investors to tell them what they want right we can design around city we could we could have
00:30:38
a place uh in the decision making processes as well that's we're trying to do we're trying to inspire
00:30:43
or trying to provoke through our actions in public space or trying to disrupt where there's no furniture will build it to
00:30:51
anyone have an impact through uh like i said soft and hardy was see these things built in physical public space
00:30:57
we're doing it 'cause we want to make it change we're doing it because we
00:31:00
want to make c. d.s better better place for their children and their kids
00:31:05
and we think all aspects to c. d. need thought my time c. d.'s new thought as well a bit of
00:31:10
action after sun down is as vital as bike lanes in a smooth tram line this is from the model
00:31:16
night cities are really important to cities in the world now have nightmares amsterdam and london
00:31:22
is the near that's just responsible for social lacked activity in economic activity after
00:31:27
dark is incredibly important part to see that we don't really think about
00:31:31
so the night c. d.'s also important thing we're we're working on in can only from your time says
00:31:37
we need to build in that and smart environmentally
00:31:40
friendly equitable infrastructure we to provide everyone access
00:31:44
the infrastructure like mobility services sort trams and trains in order for them to get home in a
00:31:49
faster way to get to work in a faster way make their neighbour heard more livable
00:31:54
so the project they're working on our costs a six countries uh with eleven institutions
00:32:00
it's called shared c. d.'s creative momentum shared cities is primarily taking place in central and eastern europe
00:32:07
the countries you see here it's based in prague with the kind of nerve centre merlin the project
00:32:15
you're the partners it's led by resign my organisation we were focusing on the program the cultural aspects
00:32:22
and they get institute is focusing on kind of a minister in the project and also check
00:32:26
centres in both get institute in check centres between the two is something like three hundred
00:32:32
part or three hundred people or or or decisions in the network outside of this region around the world
00:32:38
uh so we reach a lot of uh we reach a lot of the landscape uh through the project through
00:32:42
those two partners uh_huh and we've got sixty five people working on this uh on on mostly cultural activities
00:32:50
the duration is up until two thousand twenty we have three hundred activities happening in events are taking place
00:32:57
each cities each of the city mostly free of answer the public we have one tonight actually
00:33:02
uh and user events or talk about all the things we present that
00:33:05
presented here about the share economy about mobility about public space
00:33:10
about how callous culture actions in cities yeah give people more access to make a decision making process
00:33:16
how the to inspire people and teach them how to be more involved in the process of making their own city
00:33:21
we're sharing ideas i think that's the most important aspect of what we do in with this product is doing
00:33:27
we're trying to identify solutions that are not just market driven right we all know the big companies involved the share economy which
00:33:33
they care being be in we were in a couple of big companies like that they're more market driven right there
00:33:39
providing a good service and that's why they're popular uh put the mostly market driven in private so we want to provide
00:33:45
it identify other solutions different ways in which you can make
00:33:48
furniture for public space for example not huge market potential
00:33:52
but allows people get involved initially um i think this is one of the core aspects of this project
00:33:57
is trying to identify these things were doing internet a major exhibition which starts in two thousand nineteen
00:34:02
this will travel starts in berlin will probably be in venice in
00:34:07
the water into north american probably asia we're doing through publication
00:34:11
in atlas yeah was would be about sharing is will benchmark sharing
00:34:15
in this region against sharing in other major cities like
00:34:19
soul san francisco london zoo three
00:34:22
the major ones are
00:34:27
uh there was no we're exposed to be there but up as part of this project is another big project we're working on call manifesto
00:34:33
manifest as a pop up space in the city of prague uh this is
00:34:37
kind of familiar box park maybe you're familiar with that from london
00:34:40
um manifest they'll be a hub of about twenty uh eateries so
00:34:45
kind as a nice restaurant concepts based in the region
00:34:49
the other kind of street food concept here the limited menu will
00:34:52
also have like four five local retailers selling mostly kind of
00:34:56
uh things that are new interesting from your from for tours you know interesting like locally
00:35:01
made products or some retail outlets so that clothing in in locally made designer goods
00:35:07
so many festival open in march two thousand eighteen right in the centre
00:35:11
prague so kind of bring a new kind of a market hall
00:35:14
a cultural activities mm right to the centre prague which is both for internationals and taurus
00:35:20
it's an abandoned site and former uh really are it's not being
00:35:24
used now would be a future construction project and we're trying
00:35:28
one of the things are reset tries to do is to try to allow people re imagine spaces in their city
00:35:33
so manifest all our people re imagine what could be there in the future uh initially it to your project which will move
00:35:39
then to prague six anywhere that we want to in the world i think so that's that's happening it's a very exciting
00:35:46
one of the things i'm working on really hard right now is reset lisbon uh we're opening a new
00:35:50
new events in lisbon on february twelfth and we have a ongoing meetings with the city of
00:35:55
lisbon to bring all the activities that we've done a hundred and twenty five activities here in prague
00:35:59
and start to move that platform to lisbon so we're starting their two thousand eighteen with february
00:36:05
we do another events in november two thousand eighteen a major event for several thousand people
00:36:10
and then we'll try to probe probably expand all of our to lose their two thousand nineteen so we're working with the mount museum
00:36:15
starting in february for that in the city was one after that
00:36:18
uh_huh so i think we can play this video typical experience
00:36:25
you can press play or
00:37:22
huh or so that's a classic resigned flagship
00:37:28
event about twelve hundred thirteen hundred people
00:37:31
all from different sectors to talk about citizen architecture also if there's anything i can leave you with a not probably
00:37:37
and a little bit sooner than than expected about them tell everyone i love questions but with faculty with anything
00:37:43
i think it's to be bold is to think about season i think about
00:37:47
the way in which we can improve our cities by attracting events
00:37:52
by attracting different types of businesses by by enabling citizens
00:37:56
to take care of their public space to be involved in the development
00:37:59
their c. to give access to people have good business ideas
00:38:03
to open up new types shops new types of cafe is new types of cultural spaces in your city
00:38:08
and to work with cultural organisations into work with culture to the catalyst economy make
00:38:13
a lot of your your from from a tourism bureaus or convention bureaus
00:38:17
in thinking about new ways in which you can kind of callous around cities uh and and and i think it's important
00:38:23
thing about why we're doing that that we can inspire cultural activity we can make people really love their place
00:38:29
so it's about being bold about using designed to be bold it's about being a
00:38:33
little bit crazy not afraid not being afraid to go beyond what we expect
00:38:39
not our choice we ask you what's yours um so that's it thank you uh_huh
00:38:48
okay i should also mention that uh uh we're going to have a lot to mention this we
00:38:54
have a great a custom designed to give to here um and i think anyone with a
00:38:58
polygonal might decide with the bass question although you're going to decide tie
00:39:02
with a recession whether got the gay press question so if
00:39:05
if the best guy show a custom design from a local designer
00:39:08
here prague a custom designed gets which i think we can
00:39:12
maybe hold the what's inside and so you open the keep if this is
00:39:15
a blocks just just every second of making lots of boats could
00:39:18
you get the slide back up where you've got these words cool competitive
00:39:22
uh in control a shift away back is that i know that
00:39:28
but it was the slide that really struck through
00:39:32
you and the word is to just get it get the slide of him yeah
00:39:35
this is from mike bloomberg mare feared for memory in your city uh_huh
00:39:41
uh_huh
00:39:44
the
00:39:47
oh there are the focus is a very powerful quoted said a lot really about what
00:39:52
your presentation that was about it before we we return to the audience here
00:39:57
was was the old this thing you've done concrete the boldest thing to resurface
00:40:03
them for prolog take produce example was the bold this thing you did
00:40:09
to cut a lot of these this city you get we're using good counsellors what was it was an example
00:40:15
yeah the well that i can answer that a couple ways uh we started in two thousand
00:40:19
a leaven more or less with nothing but an idea in a couple of volunteers
00:40:23
and we started because no one was talking about these issues
00:40:26
known was talking about public space or sustainable mobility
00:40:30
uh no was talking about smart cities like using technology to improve sees
00:40:34
so the boulders thing we did was disrupt you know windows support you know we we just sort of came on the scene
00:40:40
and one of the first things we did is we organise a major festival mostly in public
00:40:45
space with a conference which was about fourteen fifty people it's pretty small mostly for students
00:40:50
but the major action which attracted liked that douse the people that ten thousand people in the first year
00:40:55
was we we designed this pavilion maybe you saw it it's it's sort of a few slides back it's a huge bowl there
00:41:01
are three bubbles actually would fill this room um and they come out of the back in the nineteen seventies camper
00:41:06
so we found this camper from berlin that inflatable bubbled look at if you look on
00:41:10
the top looks like mickey mouse uh him inflated this this ball these bubbles in
00:41:14
public space at the national theatre and we held dozens of activities they're workshops we
00:41:20
we showed films are all sold out we had a sort of exhibition there
00:41:25
we did some dance competition in the public space is probably one of the bowls things we did their sort of
00:41:30
put our stamp on the scene to say like we're here we're gonna disrupt the process and we want
00:41:35
investors in in the city leaders to think about public space in anyway so is literally a a
00:41:41
these things wouldn't just never seen in those three areas before i
00:41:45
try so people will pause and say what is this
00:41:48
that's what's in it for them you say we want people to this what's in it for that why would they
00:41:53
joining them this movement vocal like decision makers and yeah what what
00:41:58
what what turns them along the way that fraser yeah sure
00:42:01
i mean i the k. i. presented in in the high line or a broken bridge parking you're just a couple of
00:42:06
examples a times square these are major to do something very simple
00:42:11
like in times square was done by the mayor bloomberg jets
00:42:14
icon the transportation commissioner is a sort of just said we're gonna stop traffic from coming through the streets on broadway
00:42:20
really close to a traffic and they painted history they painted blue and they put out
00:42:25
some like two dollar chairs for you know couple thousand shares for the for summer
00:42:29
this average gonna change people's perspective perspective and perception of the streets
00:42:33
were not just for cars is for people as well
00:42:36
and everyone hated that i mean everyone outside the planning architecture to be rethought like these people are crazy
00:42:42
you know i everyone knows you need cars for retail to survive well maybe in the
00:42:47
suburbs but non cities that that's not true actually cars don't spend money people do
00:42:51
so if you close treats the cars you also have a whole lot more people spending money in their shops
00:42:56
uh so the retail environment improved amassed a dramatically then also the retirements doing
00:43:01
better they didn't start to contribute to the times square redevelopment find
00:43:05
lots of private companies are paying in because they wanna better public space right they wanna nicer place for people to visit
00:43:10
so things like treason furniture are just nice to have they actually have huge
00:43:15
bottom line potential in implications on on business is was if your
00:43:20
changing the visuals but people sees can live yeah that's what
00:43:24
architecture is is a is very much about design
00:43:27
very much about the design people's environment okay let's this since the code into the um i don't
00:43:32
know who you are but we are gonna give you or the city or destination marketers
00:43:38
great to see that we got lots of city and desolation the market is that
00:43:43
how many of you work up with the news uh represent values
00:43:47
okay great uh um material working with meeting managers
00:43:52
and got a meeting management company so meeting
00:43:56
okay so basically what the product to the uh the city youth estimation marked as a and then
00:44:01
use because we got a question fuelled like you you can see the colours spread out here
00:44:05
if you choose but i could you see if you see someone sit on the road and looking lonely
00:44:10
groupie with what are like if they were looking at cool competitive control
00:44:15
based on what we've heard robots and it couldn't we just ask you to have a little round
00:44:20
discussion to what extent of the destinations or cities that you represent all the news
00:44:27
have a little talk about to what extent do you feel that you
00:44:30
are cool competitive i mean control is a control that was you
00:44:35
would not just drifting into the future we have a we have a platter with thinking about how we collaborate since right and cats
00:44:41
allies in these cities of this nation's yeah we don't drift into the future replanted okay so just just have a kind of a
00:44:47
a an open discussion get together as well you can see i can see the ones or not to get a group together
00:44:53
tell each other where you're from a bit idea to go to so where you don't know because what i'd
00:44:57
like to hear from you is different cities and destinations right sharing ideas to what extent are you cool
00:45:04
competitive and in control here from each other will give you a ten
00:45:09
minutes to talk about that before we take some few days
01:00:24
uh_huh
01:00:26
if uh huh huh
01:00:33
huh
01:00:37
yeah
01:00:55
huh huh
01:01:00
if you are
01:01:04
yeah
01:01:05
it's
01:01:09
okay
01:01:13
from from
01:01:17
alright there we go uh weeping circulating little bay um you got stock in a good way in this group here
01:01:25
was there anything interesting coming out in that group about him yeah i was uh i was surprised at that
01:01:30
i i wasn't sure how much people knew about some the topics i presented sort of very high level about the issues that we're focused on
01:01:36
and presented on a really beautiful way but this group actually identify that some of the issues that presented were problematic
01:01:43
like a lotta cities uh like amsterdam where i think many people come from or copenhagen or or london
01:01:49
um have been doing this sort of stuff putting bike lanes in encouraging cafes
01:01:53
and kind of creative uh centres and things and what that's done
01:01:56
is it's attractive everyone but it's also driven up the cost of living so i talked just for like one or two slide about affordability
01:02:03
and that's what the what we're talking about there's how how can the c. d.'s sort of
01:02:07
control this kind of stuff like it's it's clear i think from my perspective that c. d.'s are much better off today than
01:02:13
they were like ten twenty years ago but there's also problems that come along with that affordability is the biggest one so
01:02:20
the government needs to step in i think municipalities and then stay governments need
01:02:24
to step in and provide more controls on housing to for before ability
01:02:27
the cream or kind of a four because with the colours we have overheard in this group
01:02:31
valve from from you can also was talking exactly about this the the level of bureaucracy
01:02:36
it's so difficult to get through the new basically say what can we do
01:02:41
about that was about being control it's all it's a lot smarter governance
01:02:45
so uh i tend when you face with this what of bureaucracy will yeah i mean it's like the the
01:02:50
there's this seems to be no no good balance that like uh i i talked about one good example
01:02:55
in in vienna in in in via a has one of
01:02:58
the highest rates of government on housing municipality on housing
01:03:03
uh in the world and something like sixty sixty three percent of that housing is is rent controlled so
01:03:07
is it sort of middle class it's accessible to the middle class that's a good model i think
01:03:13
it's not difficult to get into a house uh the the market the private sector's doing fine
01:03:19
that all the market is fine but the government has some control of the cost of real estate i think that's really important
01:03:25
government bureaucracy is always a problem uh and i don't necessarily advocate for more more regulation i just think that
01:03:30
smarter regulation is definitely necessary the market is kind of gotten out of control in the season i think
01:03:37
regulating in this very smart way it's accessible and a large also
01:03:40
pain uh i know that paging suffered so much pay
01:03:43
in physical pain from the pollution that they're actually doing something about the yeah i live in all slow in norway
01:03:49
pain as well uh you know the kind of pushes people to
01:03:53
really do something about it um maybe it's good it's problematic
01:03:58
uh we have a i have a question looking rubber receive the question i think it's from a friend
01:04:03
is it in korea improving your when informants sometimes calls is gentrification
01:04:09
yeah he that is kind of what what you think about what can be that it does that as
01:04:14
i said like i i think if you look at the trends of the last twenty years
01:04:17
there's no question that the tide lifted all boats and cities like most
01:04:21
easier and better place and they were like twenty years ago
01:04:24
but jennifer occasions when one of the key issues there being be we talked about briefly in this group
01:04:29
uh has caused like over now i know when everyone first thought everybody was kind of cute
01:04:34
unlike oh it's great you can share flatten overnight like in two years or three years
01:04:38
developers are buying entire buildings innards are renting a flat out like hotels
01:04:43
with professional property managers and this is causing a huge problem is something we're focused on here
01:04:47
prodding also in in lisbon trying to help identify it solutions i can control justification
01:04:53
you want cease to improve the public spaces and just because the cause an adverse effect on housing prices are real surprises
01:05:00
or there's too many cafes doesn't mean you shouldn't do it but there should be some part kind of plan and if
01:05:04
like it that's where i get to like you need to sort of plan the future you can just drift there
01:05:08
um see to identify where the c. wants to be in sort of ten or fifteen years in
01:05:13
trying to push in that direction while creating some controls on on the cost of land
01:05:18
in in the in also the time you can't really control comes in like the that's not what i would advocate for
01:05:24
um but you need to kind of create a in a byron that's accessible to everybody
01:05:28
so you wanna encourage diversity encourage different types of businesses and you can
01:05:32
do that very simply through through proper zoning and proper planning
01:05:36
um but without control you can kind of get things a little bit out of hand like here in prague i would say is out of hand
01:05:41
listen is out of hand in terms of tourism in here the year b. b. economy so the
01:05:47
needs to be some kind of applying all slow wasn't of homes to back to the city
01:05:51
probably due process is crazy will it because it's too easy to buy a property
01:05:58
decorated cellular profit so the pro simple regulation invisible regulation does work
01:06:04
the person claims though you cannot sell the property for to use if you do that
01:06:09
you must keep abruptly otherwise you you you receive penalty for angel a higher interest
01:06:15
housing prices should only yeah near to the has a flat tax
01:06:19
fifty percent tax if you if you sell the property within three years original purchase
01:06:24
great we have any uh the option to just a couple of a stephanie for the question
01:06:29
for most of the you'd like to us as well over here great or even like so we
01:06:32
can we okay or you're you're a big lead with the big boys so that that
01:06:37
just give your mike and you can ah a little pull from you cancel
01:06:42
in england um in terms of international collaboration with all the cities but
01:06:48
for me um of a small city but how why what was the best roof receive
01:06:52
it does want to collaborate with another city um indeed disruptive we're not through the
01:06:58
bureaucratic you know little government channels put to get those conversations happening with c.
01:07:03
d.'s of comparable size and finding those cities that are out there that
01:07:07
uh there's a little bit of that with a lot in common with with my city rather than if you should either there's no kind of
01:07:13
during comparison between those yeah sure countryside and come to our flagship event
01:07:18
and we talk a lot about second cities not just sort of like the the major economic codes and and
01:07:23
world that we talk a lot about what's happening in smaller cities because often i find the cities like he from manchester
01:07:29
so it is that there are ah sorry newcastle sorry uh those
01:07:33
uh offencive i know a very often times will uh
01:07:38
people uh ins and sort of mid size smaller cities can move faster uh
01:07:42
because they don't have the you know they need to work harder
01:07:45
uh they need to do more sort of attract more people so um yeah
01:07:48
conservancy agree side i think of like these kind of answer or
01:07:51
set up for these kind of interactions to learn about what's happening out
01:07:55
there and there's lots of platforms to to read like a
01:07:58
you normally i'm not just plugging our media partner but the atlantic city lab
01:08:02
is is uh is one of the premier global publications on c. d.'s
01:08:07
um it's run by atlantic the north american magazine which is online platform called c. lab
01:08:12
and see eleven talks a lot about finishes in smaller cities um in particular either interested in sort of
01:08:18
bottom up initiatives that are not just from from the top down which i think is more
01:08:21
like your business development and economic development is coming mostly from small businesses as amused
01:08:27
something like ninety percent of the growth will come from that sector in c. represents a lot
01:08:30
of those kind of smaller projects that are helping so um that's an on line platform
01:08:35
um but i think just getting out to events like like what we do and not just ours but
01:08:40
others uh likes you can follow cities today is the c. d.'s today is the
01:08:46
online publication it puts out a a lot of events around the world um they promote
01:08:50
a lot of stuff and you can find out things in england or elsewhere
01:08:54
i'm avenue family view would raise your hand and say that you you come
01:08:59
from a cool city but nobody would describe the cities is cool
01:09:05
everybody persons around here at what about competitive or you competitive city
01:09:12
chorus
01:09:15
have you got any ideas they buy he can be more competitive that's what we're looking for how many we
01:09:19
would raise your hand and say that you're in control as a city you know where you're going
01:09:26
'cause that's what i heard actually group saying i don't know what anybody in control
01:09:30
yeah the does surprise me as well would you said it's as well
01:09:34
well i think the it's about uh we talked a little bit on stage of about uh it was things
01:09:39
we also do is branding we do see branding in in in branding for real estate development projects
01:09:43
and creating a brand for c. known really things about like what and and you can create a brand for your c. d.
01:09:49
just like we wanna be us eve innovation or we wanna be a city of culture
01:09:53
there should maybe there's more like three or four brands free see there's the local
01:09:56
brand what is your city mean to your local residents in how can they parted participate
01:10:01
um there's the international kind of investor brand how you tracked investment you see
01:10:05
there's a kind of tourism around like we want people to know about your c. in prague would you know up rock you come for a couple days
01:10:12
you have some cheap beer and you see the castle in the bridge even the bridges i think that that is on the logo of the
01:10:18
and so i you know is this the kind of brandy really want everyone to know about or do you want your your brand
01:10:23
then have some plan behind it bigger branches always have a plan it should just be a logo or sort of quick slogan
01:10:30
if you wanna be innovation see it means you have to have a startup font means you have to
01:10:33
have a good environment first for young people start businesses or all people to start new businesses
01:10:38
so you have to kind of follow up with a plan and that's what it means not being in control i think you have to
01:10:43
sort of like set the direction say with a big vision it's like twenty years from now we wanna be this kind of city
01:10:49
but we have to be adaptable because the market will change with sort of
01:10:52
be flexible to incorporate new types of businesses respond to their growth
01:10:56
um but at least we're gonna keep on the track we can just keep shifting every
01:10:59
cat time the mayor changes or which records the collaboration more rights yeah yeah
01:11:05
weaver that's how i'm afraid i'm going to let you pick the best me no that's your problem he to explain what it is for us
01:11:12
what is it okay this is a a into doesn't seventeen we worked
01:11:15
with a a pretty famous a graphic designer and and create designer
01:11:20
our branding and um we have a light bulb which is in the shape of a heart
01:11:25
so it's a three dimensional imprinted custom label um one of like two hundred
01:11:30
units and we're so we're also kind of using this fundraising uh
01:11:34
uh i don't merchandising so we're gonna give one away today so you have
01:11:38
a a custom design like building a house somewhere and i lost uh
01:11:43
if six of my light bulbs one of the last few weeks not these ones other
01:11:46
oneself actually need this um to best question maybe is should the audience choice um
01:11:52
what we think the best question was not like i was just for the products there's a there's a woman
01:11:58
over here i'm i'm a little bit biased who represents a believe cake ten is the right of the
01:12:05
'cause uh you're just going crazy passionate about your city so round of applause there for quite a
01:12:16
well that was okay all times when i'm forcing thanks everyone for joining us today think

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