Player is loading...

Embed

Embed code

Transcriptions

Note: this content has been automatically generated.
00:00:01
uh_huh
00:00:03
good morning
00:00:06
how are year oh yeah well ah
00:00:11
that's terrible let's try that again oh yeah well ah
00:00:15
wonderful that's great so i'll um oh oh when i talk to people
00:00:20
inside of a 'cause i've just been in ireland and scotland
00:00:24
um they said very going next um i said i'm going to speak true
00:00:29
well what can i call it the international congress of congresses and
00:00:36
well the first thing they do is they laugh okay exactly like that and and
00:00:41
then they poles and you can say don't think a that is so cool
00:00:47
congress of congress's this is like pink of cain
00:00:51
is basically it really doesn't get any better
00:00:54
the being at the congress of uh congress's so i'm delighted to
00:01:00
be able to be in prague for this very short time with here is actually the fiftieth country and um
00:01:06
which i've uh given the keynote i was counting them all that so it's a bit of a milestone
00:01:11
uh from a and i'm sure many of you have been to many of these conferences and it's
00:01:16
it's a milestone for you as well it's also nice to be in the president's choice session
00:01:21
um when you get to be the president's choice you you wonder what
00:01:25
that isn't it conjures up all kinds of images for me
00:01:28
uh i i'm uh as you guessed by max sometime i'm british
00:01:33
and i'm also canadian so i'm i'm british and and canadian
00:01:37
and um there's a supermarket in uh canada on the
00:01:40
leading brand uh in the supermarket is this
00:01:45
so it is a it is president's choice so ah so you
00:01:50
have toured ways of thinking about presidents choice of those may
00:01:54
um then if you're if you get bored with me or your mind drifts off about it to think of
00:02:00
this as presidents choice so think think of me as decadent chocolate
00:02:06
and uh i'm a might make some really good uh progress together consent to that slide
00:02:12
if you want to send you can have it for all future presentations or
00:02:18
so i'll um i went to think about three questions as we start
00:02:26
imagine
00:02:29
but you're starting a small network of schools your employed
00:02:33
in a small network of schools in latin america
00:02:39
and the person i was founded this network says or
00:02:42
vision is the within one or two generations
00:02:47
in this war torn country through our schools
00:02:52
we will create peace and democracy
00:02:57
imagine
00:02:59
what is your vision for your organisation and community
00:03:05
is it as bold as that kind of vision that people wanted to achieve together
00:03:13
or imagine that you have to give a page or a presentation of the speaker of time is
00:03:20
gonna talk are gonna talk about giving pitches and imagine you have to give your page
00:03:28
in public in front of twenty people
00:03:33
whose explicit job is to give you very critical feedback
00:03:39
in the middle of you giving your page
00:03:42
how would you feel about that
00:03:47
imagine if your organisation twenty percent of your time as
00:03:52
a condition of your salary in your contract
00:03:56
is that you must devoted to helping your competitors
00:04:02
twenty percent of your time it's in your contract you must help the people who are competing with you
00:04:08
how would you feel about that these all aspects of what we think all of
00:04:16
as the harder parts of professional collaboration
00:04:21
i spent twenty five years working on professional collaboration i've done
00:04:25
it in education as a professor in education researcher
00:04:29
and i've also done it in business and sports as a professor
00:04:32
of of management i've looked in all these three sectors
00:04:37
um what i want to share with you today is that is this reports which is out of
00:04:44
but then last week but otherwise foundation based in tow heart which is where i'm going next
00:04:50
so if you just google may agreeable that you find it online and you can
00:04:53
read you can read everything that basically almost of that we're talking about today
00:04:59
and it's um it's key idea it is a
00:05:03
distinction between professional collaboration uh collaborative professionalism
00:05:09
um this sounds very pointy headed and quite abstract but i'm gonna unpack it for
00:05:14
you in a way that i hope you find useful later but first
00:05:18
there's a little exercise and this is what i would like you to do
00:05:22
so starting on this side of the roll so whoever is on the side
00:05:28
could you go across the role and just go a. b. a. b. a. b. a. b. or if you don't
00:05:34
want to do a big old want to want to want to want to so you all well here
00:05:40
two one two so just go across your do the same over here uh okay
00:05:47
one to one to go across and the same but that and just do that quickly okay want to want to
00:05:55
um
00:05:59
uh_huh
00:06:12
oh okay i that should be done yeah hands up the number once
00:06:19
that's not the number jurors
00:06:22
that's not the number three this ah just okay alright well so as to well there
00:06:29
so i'll
00:06:30
other ones this is your task
00:06:33
uh and the next i'm thirty seconds away
00:06:38
to think about your culture three sayings
00:06:42
up r. y. collaboration is a good thing three
00:06:46
three everyday sayings that to that you
00:06:49
might have the use in everyday life that you're not that might have told you
00:06:54
or or or or you're just schoolteacher three sayings
00:06:58
the all express what collaboration is a
00:07:01
good thing three sayings in everyday life from the number two rows comes up
00:07:06
okay three cents about why collaboration is a bad idea all the things all
00:07:11
things that are wrong with collaboration or why you should do it
00:07:14
think for think for thirty forty five seconds the guthrie sayings in
00:07:20
you had get the wheels going don't talk with anybody else
00:07:23
just think in your culture three sayings number ones like operations
00:07:29
a good thing number two rooms michael operations about thing
00:07:36
this board who yes it's hard isn't it come on the about this must be told you something
00:07:47
as a first got least wow
00:07:52
okay call for click i get of brains going
00:08:03
alright this is not a very simple you should all have a lease will ask
00:08:08
you to get three 'cause actually three's not my target once my target
00:08:13
but i think it's better to have a stretch target and just miss it
00:08:16
then have any 'cause then have an easy targets in reach it okay
00:08:20
so i'll or you have to do now is what the number one so the number twos turn and talk to each other
00:08:26
and and share a saying that size collaboration so good thing
00:08:31
with the saying that says collaborations a bad thing
00:08:34
discuss for two minutes and then we'll come back and we'll take this further off you go
00:09:06
oh
00:09:08
yeah
00:09:50
huh huh
00:10:44
how often are
00:10:48
like here
00:10:51
so now
00:10:53
yes couple ideas from the culture that i made
00:10:59
so i don't know these i positively we say many times make light work
00:11:07
the trouble she yeah it is a trouble how often
00:11:12
no man or woman is an island unto themselves these are all
00:11:18
well known sightings in english in favour the value of collaboration
00:11:24
that it is is painted gives moral support it make
00:11:28
things more efficient and it's really reality nothing
00:11:33
depends on levels allow completely and then you have the opposite tell us some of the opposites
00:11:42
uh_huh right too many cooks spoil the brawl
00:11:49
or else that's my mother would often say if you all want
00:11:52
to job yeah just better do it yourself basic away
00:11:57
why can't i mean all these other incompetent people doing the job badly when they
00:12:01
could actually do it better yourself and then there's the classic english warm
00:12:07
so it's a beautiful english phrase misery loves company would just
00:12:12
love to sit around and complain with each other's all
00:12:20
so there's a lot of evidence uh in my field in other fields over about the last thirty years
00:12:26
but on average it is better to collaborate the not to collaborate
00:12:31
in teaching if you collaborate with other people but it's true in other fields
00:12:36
you guys as to whether ideals you get a wider repertoire you
00:12:40
have more strategies your get more confidence about what you're doing
00:12:46
you get support for when you make a mistake or failure people help you get back up again
00:12:51
on the face things you move around ideas between you you learn faster
00:12:56
as an organisation you more i'd charlie become you become more nimble
00:13:01
oh these are all well known benefits of collaboration um
00:13:06
the effects on performance a very very clear
00:13:10
with the rangers studies done from they like nineteen eighties
00:13:13
on words of schools that collaborate on more effective
00:13:17
the schools that don't even measure by literacy and mathematics in fact you can
00:13:22
become a completely different kind of teacher depending on who you colleagues or
00:13:28
you go from one school to another and your relationship with your colleagues to different and you
00:13:32
become a better kind of person and the same is true in the other direction
00:13:38
you move from a place where people work together to bomb where you feel on your role
00:13:43
and certainly you wonder if you can do the job anymore
00:13:49
the people around here are very powerful in terms of
00:13:53
affecting your ability to do your job well
00:13:58
so what this means is collaborating on average is better than not collaborating
00:14:04
but we're not average as the new books days beyond average
00:14:10
you can't put a toll pilots into the cockpit built for average people because pilots on average
00:14:18
you have to customise the call it it make it better on average to collaborate
00:14:23
but sometimes collaborations not so good sometimes it can be inefficient
00:14:29
on helpful force was weak fuzzy
00:14:35
it can be all these things so the issue really is why should
00:14:39
we collaborate we think we know why now how can we collaborate
00:14:44
on her way what are some of the different ways that we have to collaborate
00:14:49
what does it mean to collaborate in a good way rather than collaborated about what the difference
00:14:54
between these two things is the difference between what we call two words professional collaboration
00:15:01
which means simply what are the different ways that we can work together
00:15:07
that might be good for here or there might be better or worse might
00:15:12
be emerging or mature if we compare that to uh to collaborative professionalism
00:15:21
what this means is not descriptive but it's prescribed if it
00:15:26
says here or some ways to collaborate more effectively
00:15:31
with more impact on the people you serve with more
00:15:35
motivation for the people who were collaborating with
00:15:39
greater retention for your industry with more capacity to
00:15:44
learn and grow all over time collaborative professionalism
00:15:52
and this web site some better you know collaborative
00:15:55
professionalism is apart collaborating working together call labour
00:16:02
working together not just talking but working together more professionally
00:16:08
more professionally means things like we use evidence and not just
00:16:12
intuition we use judgement and data combined with each other
00:16:18
we don't just talk and share on social lies but we have structured conversations
00:16:24
but uh sometimes demanding and often give feedback sometimes quite difficult
00:16:30
this is what professionals do not that best this is what doctors do says
00:16:34
what engineers do not select patients don't die uh buildings don't fall down
00:16:39
when we collaborate we don't just share and talk and have fall
00:16:44
but we often need to collaborate in a focused way to have the
00:16:48
impact that we want we collaborate we work together more professionally
00:16:54
and the other thing is also true that we are professionals or tone was qualified
00:17:00
certified we have judgement we are in some ways independent but all professionals now
00:17:07
in a very complex will have to uphold their knowledge in
00:17:12
order to serve the people that they're responsible for
00:17:17
when i walk into a doctor's i did several years ago and
00:17:21
say doctor i think i have african take like fever
00:17:27
and i mean possible
00:17:30
the doctors first thought is well this person is one of two things either he's a
00:17:36
raving hypochondriac which is actually true but i'm
00:17:43
a very high functioning high hypochondriac okay
00:17:47
so i but i'm raving hypochondriac or lionel something i thought the doctor doesn't know i'll
00:17:54
so what does the doctor i and i says well hard you know how you've got african to like fever
00:18:01
so first you have to listen to the people you say uh let's say well i've been in africa
00:18:06
second it has high tech infestation of third there is a thing on my
00:18:13
body in a place i'm not prepared to talk about to your work
00:18:19
where i don't normally have well
00:18:24
so i said okay we'll take a look at you so take i'll take take some work on
00:18:28
then the other thing is and then of course i know my body i know we're having
00:18:34
can control the internet
00:18:37
why didn't they so i can look up all the so looks at me a a is never seen african to bite favour
00:18:44
before and in fact if you get bitten by take you
00:18:47
have a one in two million chance of being infected
00:18:52
so it was a really on market day the day i got african to bite fever okay
00:18:58
so looked at may inmates a preliminary diagnosis and then what does
00:19:02
it do because to form the department to tropical medicine
00:19:06
because he's not the expert on everything because the range of medical issues that people bring gain is too complicated
00:19:13
for anyone doctor just like in a class with a group of
00:19:16
kids is too complicated for anyone teach eternal having cold
00:19:21
the department of tropical medicine than what's on the internet because
00:19:25
our to big like ten under was circle round
00:19:28
this thing on my body and they use the word
00:19:31
neck rejoicing which is not a good word basically
00:19:36
and they said if the redness goals are of this line that i have drawn around here
00:19:42
you must immediately go to emergency you must tell want to admit to you and you must have a trip
00:19:48
on the strongest level of antibiotics that they have otherwise
00:19:52
you will die so i took that quite seriously
00:19:56
it took me also strong antibiotics i didn't need to go to the hospital
00:19:59
but because i had a professional i was prepared to listen to me
00:20:04
and also to collaborate with other professionals i'm probably standing here talking
00:20:08
to you rather than being six feet under the grammar somewhere
00:20:13
so this is collaborative professionalism are you with me so for both these things
00:20:18
are important right so what we need to do is have a definition
00:20:22
this is gonna come out very quickly that some way to read year to make you read the report
00:20:28
there is okay alright did you get that huh
00:20:33
so i'll there is is more or less what i just said that you can rate and the report people say it's very good
00:20:39
but it takes a couple minutes on we have ninety minutes and
00:20:42
thirty three seconds left 'cause we started about ten minutes late
00:20:46
so i'm not gonna let you read through that now but you can go on to the wise foundation in qatar
00:20:51
uh and it will uh i'll show you where the ship porches and you'll be able to read it but whatever instead
00:20:57
is maybe we'll get into some examples of collaborative designs that relate
00:21:03
to these three questions i put to you at the beginning
00:21:07
the first is in nineteen seventy six one local vicki cold there went from columbia to
00:21:14
stanford university got two masters degrees actually came home and a mother was a teacher
00:21:19
and inspired by what she don't on her masters degrees she decided she
00:21:24
wanted to establish a school and then a small group of schools
00:21:28
our country was torn apart by drought by violence but corruption like conflict she wanted
00:21:35
not only to make a difference to the kids in front of her
00:21:38
but she wanted to make a difference to have community or country on her society
00:21:45
so if you could call they're basically started a network of schools 'cause goal not just a
00:21:51
sideline but as a central focus would be creating peace and democracy within the society
00:21:59
this year there are twenty five fouls on schools
00:22:03
in columbia in the here that columbia got the nobel peace prize
00:22:09
twenty five thousand schools in colombia and in other parts of the world
00:22:14
all in rural jungles where teachers have
00:22:17
little capacity low training poor pay
00:22:22
but this these schools in columbia are perform all schools in latin america
00:22:28
other than cuban according to the world bank and according to unesco and
00:22:33
according to the o. e. c. d. on literacy on on mathematics
00:22:38
i would teachers with very little behind them but the secret is that the schools focus
00:22:46
on peace and democracy they use the environment not also liability but as an asset
00:22:53
this is in every school you walk into the children paint a picture of the school than that
00:22:59
of the school 'cause they want to send supplies and they want visitors or come there to have a sense of place
00:23:05
their teacher call it so one teacher school with six classes all in the same
00:23:11
school has worked for over twenty years but the scroll on the waiver
00:23:16
they use the jungle as an asset not a liability here's here's the colour come
00:23:22
where they grow vegetables which they share and they use as a and sell
00:23:27
and they use as a basis of the economics curriculum and the science curriculum
00:23:32
and then they do bird watching on that show up the flights
00:23:35
in the movements of birds and that has mathematics a biology
00:23:40
they do interdisciplinary projects they write work books on the teachers
00:23:45
go to little micro centres where the other schools connect
00:23:51
on their motorcycles
00:23:53
so no idea one of the teachers came into micro centre nearby upon a motorcycle
00:23:59
from over the mountains to come to a place where the teachers make together
00:24:05
they give each other demonstration lessons of hard to rain gauge their
00:24:09
students with the learning with their environment with each other
00:24:14
in a peaceful democratic way where students also make many
00:24:19
decisions about them burning on about their school
00:24:24
and then they share their ideas with each other if the teachers don't know what
00:24:28
to do the students she'll so the students are part of the collaboration
00:24:35
in many schools strippers or the objects of our collaboration they are
00:24:41
people we collaborate for a in the schools in columbia
00:24:47
teachers often collaborate with the students and the students will
00:24:51
help the teachers as much as vice versa
00:24:56
of a cold there is the winner of the greatest
00:24:58
prize in education the newly named he don't price
00:25:03
of a two thousand and seventeen for the best idea in the
00:25:07
world that is not the most impact four million dollars
00:25:12
two million to herself so i'm hoping to get one or two nice dinners with her out of that
00:25:20
and two million for her network this is collaboration so what
00:25:26
you just remember some of these this is collaboration
00:25:29
with meaning and purpose this is not collaboration just to
00:25:32
get your results so this is collaboration for vision
00:25:36
this is collaboration that has persistence tenacity not just fly by
00:25:41
night here in our done quickly on you go
00:25:45
this is collaboration with judgement as well as data this
00:25:49
is collaboration with the students as well as collaboration
00:25:52
for use true it's that's the first one remember the second one ask you how would you feel
00:26:01
if somebody came and you had to do a pitch you wonder of us for the first time
00:26:05
and then twelve or twenty people came in to watch you and then gave a critical feedback
00:26:11
and this is what we so this year earlier this year in hong kong
00:26:19
in hong kong offending second or school or the second or school is built on seven floors 'cause
00:26:26
there's not a lot of space in on call most of the schools got that way
00:26:32
oh school so good performer it else maybe deprive kids got because it's very successful it
00:26:38
has kids or come over the border from mainland china or go to the school
00:26:44
oh we went into amongst the things that we did we went into candies science lesson
00:26:49
candice science lesson looks pretty much like the science lessons you probably remember when you went to school
00:26:56
what should do it there had been some burgers iron filings magnets tell george
00:27:02
to remember all these the standard science like they have all of these
00:27:07
and so can they set it all goes a lot faster in their school
00:27:12
so can't is running a science lesson on the exchange of thermal energy we okay
00:27:23
you want to open my
00:27:26
possible
00:27:28
no like i'm about to die okay
00:27:32
thank you i was very good or excellent i have to have it now i mean a call hell voiceless
00:27:40
okay
00:27:43
hi
00:27:48
so can the staging assigns lesson that's actually the transfer of energy you probably
00:27:53
know better in this in high school thermal energy kinetic energy potential energy
00:28:00
uh i hate energy mechanical energy remember all this how to convert one to the other
00:28:06
so you go and and she's got one and that the class uh she's
00:28:10
got so like things in strip searches heating up on upon some
00:28:13
burner all the kids are watching the supply purple luna had that is going into the air with all the air that is right
00:28:20
she's got this or the other and they've got a child
00:28:23
with severe visual impairment who's pushing a mechanical truck down
00:28:28
the ramp they have another job blowing into recorder all
00:28:31
wind instrument to try to convert when interest uh
00:28:37
and she's doing all this quickly because well this is going on that she doesn't just demonstrate but
00:28:43
every few minutes the kids go talk to each other and they get out there quite boards
00:28:48
this or that reports they're not pieces of digital technology the little black boards that they invent that
00:28:54
they can gather around and they couldn't right and they say what each other is doing
00:28:59
they communicate on the ipod so they give each other feedback they talking to select talking for us
00:29:05
that will communicate with the teacher then the teachable talk
00:29:08
again and everything's very fast occurs at breakneck speed
00:29:13
and then a child will be asked to contribute to say something back to the rest
00:29:17
of the class can you say there i. boards hanging up the front here
00:29:23
that they are the ipod to behind them they all hang them up at the front of the class on this this is
00:29:29
pretty hectic i'm pretty dynamic in a class of about thirty five
00:29:33
kids candy is doing all this effort to twelve visitors
00:29:40
twelve visitors all going in and around the class in her class and in other people's classes as well
00:29:47
because today on this day fan laying has open class where one hundred people
00:29:53
come into the school which they do twice a year from other schools
00:29:59
principals teachers some parents and they can go into any class and watch
00:30:05
how off the classes in the school do these demonstration classes
00:30:10
about this breakneck speed you'd think candy a bit pretty nervous but
00:30:16
she's not and you know why it's not her lesson
00:30:23
it's not her lesson candy prepared this lesson with the rest of the teachers
00:30:31
in her department they created it together then they told to separately
00:30:38
then they fed back to each other how the lesson up call on how they could improve it
00:30:45
and then it was candies job to teach the lesson on behalf of all the department
00:30:52
so when people criticising a lesson they're not criticising candy
00:30:57
but they're criticising the last more than that the school candy and the
00:31:03
teacher leader in the school invite criticism from the people who visited
00:31:10
they don't just ensured it but they invited a boy are they getting
00:31:16
the visitors say some nice things they say things like the pace was really good the last on those very
00:31:22
exciting and then to say some critical things what about the children who couldn't keep up with the pace
00:31:32
what about our the quiet child represented at the front but you couldn't hear
00:31:39
what are the fact that only four children were ever called upon
00:31:43
during the lesson on all the other children were called upon
00:31:48
on these questions are asked to the teacher in public
00:31:53
not only are the insured but they're encouraged however there's a protocol
00:31:58
which which teaches a given the visitors where they must
00:32:04
be mindful of the situation the teacher is in
00:32:08
they must ask their questions respectfully on when the criticisms
00:32:13
home the teachers like the children or divided
00:32:17
into groups with i. boards on somewhere estimate positive
00:32:21
comments on summer anchorage to make negative comments
00:32:26
this is open class in family thing based on the tradition of japanese lesson study
00:32:34
and you'll see a in almost no schools anywhere all over the
00:32:39
world but it is something that they created an adopted
00:32:44
what we get from this is is feedback is a very
00:32:47
important part of improvement feedback plus the rigorous uncritical
00:32:53
as well as been supportive and praiseworthy you must structure your
00:32:58
feedback with protocols to protect the individual from being insulted
00:33:04
and if you plan that practised together they're not attacking hugh as an
00:33:08
individual but they're criticising on supporting you collectively as a group
00:33:14
or the city are you with me so far right these are two examples now i'll take it to a third one
00:33:26
this is in a shovel missus well even though the pictures of fabulous
00:33:35
other thought gonna wanna mention which is which is the most challenging really so back collaborating with your competitors
00:33:42
why would you why would you collaborate with the people who compete with you well here's a country
00:33:51
of at which we talk about your notebook we did a couple of years ago uplifting leadership singapore
00:33:57
in nineteen sixty five according to the naturalist
00:34:01
david attenborough singapore was just a group
00:34:05
of small tin sheds in a set of muddy fields
00:34:10
but prime minister leak one knew his vision he was that within a single generation
00:34:17
singapore would become one of the leading economies in the world
00:34:22
one of the ways that that this was through education funding
00:34:27
education by paying teachers well by having lots assign
00:34:33
some math background people in teaching were paid well so
00:34:37
they wouldn't go into engineering or competing occupations
00:34:43
and then they became top of all the international test performances
00:34:48
well they said this is not enough 'cause they were top by
00:34:51
having lots of testing by having lots of standardise content
00:34:56
and they could see the world becoming digital uh knew that their kids
00:35:00
needed to be creative so at the moment they were most successful
00:35:06
they decided to change it it's one of the hardest things to do it's
00:35:10
easy to change when you're failing it's essential to change when you succeeded
00:35:16
it's easy to change when you failing is essential to change when you're succeeding they
00:35:22
decided they become more creative more innovative on one way that would do that
00:35:27
is by schools to compete actually collaborating with each other and we heard this
00:35:32
phrase over and over again in singapore would give away our best ideals
00:35:40
so it mixes have to keep inventing new ones
00:35:44
if you give away your best ideas it helps other people then
00:35:48
you are no longer had with your best ideas anymore
00:35:51
so you gotta go keep inventing another and another and another part of dot
00:35:55
sickly helping other people actually helps yourself and then here's the product
00:36:03
of hackney in the middle of london
00:36:06
hackney in the nineteen nineties even as late as two thousand and
00:36:11
three i was the lowest performing school district local authority
00:36:17
and the whole of england it was one hundred and forty of art of one hundred and forty
00:36:23
with a poor working class high unemployed population
00:36:29
people sent their children if they called outside hackney
00:36:33
because the schools in hackney were so bad
00:36:37
and eventually in desperation they gave hackney to trust to a non profit trust on the head
00:36:43
of the trust came in to all the head teachers from hackney and said to them
00:36:49
your ashamed to working hackney what you your shade
00:36:55
'cause what everybody knows about you is that you call be ahead
00:36:59
teacher anywhere else the only place you can get a job
00:37:03
as a head teacher is in hackney 'cause hackney sold that
00:37:08
and you don't like to tell people where you work
00:37:13
and he said in ten years will last you'll be per hour to working hackney
00:37:18
you'll poles apart being in hackney people will envy you for working in hackney
00:37:26
and they did that by many mains but one of them they did was they decided when they hired had teachers
00:37:32
twenty percent of your contract would be devoted to
00:37:36
helping other schools that you were competing with
00:37:41
and the strategy was very simple that by schools helping schools all
00:37:46
the schools got better there and they was know each other
00:37:51
there and it was all the other places the parents were sending their children to
00:37:56
as the schools got better the children stayed within the community also stayed
00:38:02
within the community the community got stronger as the community got stronger
00:38:07
children came to school with more 'cause they have better support from their parents over time
00:38:13
when you're collaborate with competitors it creates a greater
00:38:17
good it fulfils your vision it establishes
00:38:21
a moral purpose and if you give away your best ideals
00:38:26
that makes you keep inventing new caesar three things
00:38:30
about collaboration what do they add up to
00:38:38
one on the left is sort of weaker professional collaboration so have
00:38:43
a look at this and think where your work on this
00:38:46
chart in terms of how you collaborate with other people is
00:38:50
it a lot of select meetings we short term goals
00:38:55
is it loose fuzzy talk but there's an election
00:39:00
well collaborating on things that other people are telling it to collaborate on rather than on things you've decided yourself
00:39:08
well you on the left hand side of the charts are you're collaborating for the people rather than
00:39:13
with other people just ruin organisations not just in schools right you're moving over to the right
00:39:22
are you talking but you're also doing things 'cause collaborations call labour it's not just to talk together
00:39:28
it's to work together to make something to produce something
00:39:32
to create an event or congress or program
00:39:38
on the right hand side is about a vision of meaning and purpose like the schools in
00:39:44
columbia not just of air racing their test scores but about creating peace and democracy
00:39:52
it's about collaboration b. and then headed in the way you
00:39:55
work everyday not just in the meeting here or there
00:40:01
it's about the people developing collaboration not just the boss is telling you how to collaborate
00:40:08
it's a bar you initiating things and not just implementing other initiatives
00:40:16
in collaborative professionalism there's more initiative fewer initiatives
00:40:23
i mean collaborative professionalism the talk the feedback the conversation is deeper it's
00:40:30
more demanding it's not miserable it's it's not aggressive but it's professional
00:40:37
we can take criticism we invited uh may act upon it in order to make our group better over time
00:40:45
me too but but the people we serve not just for the people so
00:40:50
this is collaborative professionals
00:40:54
there's some examples from home call
00:40:58
from columbia from modal from singapore from four actually three
00:41:05
different continents in different parts of the world
00:41:10
it's not easy to do to collaborate well and it says time's up so it won't let me have any
00:41:15
more of my powerpoint slides but i need to show the last one so could you shortly please
00:41:23
and low
00:41:27
there we go all that no okay going
00:41:31
well that not that that's me even as a child that's me when i'm fifty that's may climb in the mountains in italy
00:41:38
so i'll just to conclude a it's important to collaborated
00:41:44
anytime but when times or difficult when the heart
00:41:49
when we live in a world of conflict violence hatred suspicion
00:41:57
it's even more important to pull together to work together as a community helen keller said
00:42:04
working with a friend in the dark is better than walking alone and the light
00:42:11
and in case you haven't noticed your in prague
00:42:16
you're in prague which itself went through a tremendous transformation
00:42:23
after the change from soviet societies to modern democracy
00:42:30
and the leader of prop form of power choose her so went
00:42:33
to say yesterday and the cafe already might to eight is
00:42:43
back laugh have l. walls back laugh that's l. imprisoned twice for his beliefs
00:42:51
placed under constant surveillance by the secret police it's not
00:42:56
easy to criticising is hard to criticising actually
00:43:00
many people around the world so for for the criticism but he knew
00:43:04
with other people with the great movement have to bring about
00:43:10
a transformation in the society that makes it possible
00:43:14
all four walls to be here today
00:43:18
and that comes from turning a collaborative vision into a collective reality
00:43:24
what he said that we should all remember is this
00:43:30
vision is not enough
00:43:34
it must be combined with venture what adventure it's not enough to stair steps
00:43:43
but it's essential together to step up the stairs collaborations not just a vital
00:43:51
but it's not just for the people collaboration is about action
00:43:57
and it's hard work and it's with the people on this is why we're here now
00:44:02
thank you for listening and enjoy the rest of your congress off congresses
00:44:22
cranky and the i'm not sure if we do you have any time
00:44:25
to any questions if anyone had a d. speaking had information
00:44:29
advance can ever mason williams with you would be spiteful divisions lounge meeting for you
00:44:35
and then you might be basic you like it is the new mondays but within the system
00:44:41
i don't think snow it thank you very much to have a running all the way here and i'm sure

Share this talk: 


Conference program

172 views
151 views
107 views
ICCA Congress 2017 Day 2 - President’s Choice Session: Collaborative Professionalism: The next knowledge frontier
Prof. Andrew Hargreaves, Brennan Chair in Education, Lynch School of Education
13 Nov. 2017 · 12:22 p.m.
147 views
ICCA Congress 2017 Day 4 - The Disruptive Art Of Leadership
Miha Pogacnik, Managing Director, ECOCULTURE S.E.C.S.
15 Nov. 2017 · 10:37 a.m.
208 views