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i'm i'm gonna stop someone talk about somalia and just to kind of pick up on
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um people mention somalia mentioned in the keynote so uh this morning as a place of innovation
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and uh it's very dynamic places very interesting very fascinating place
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um and it's been a very important environment for the development of cash programming
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but it's also important to mention uh as has been mentioned that in two thousand eleven the was a fan in a
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quarter of a million people died and we failed as a humanitarian community in that environment is quite interesting to contrast
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the the position of somalia as a place of innovation but also the
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place it's extremely difficult to work and something to develop that idea
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um so if you would only context 'cause i think not all of you will be
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familiar with the somali are um and the state of smaller collapse demurely nineteen ninety
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and since then there's existed a very variable political and security
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context somaliland for example is a self declared independent public
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internationally monitored democratic elections on is largely peaceful involvement
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um and south central somalia in in great
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contrast is highly contested but internationally recognised
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uh that controls the government control very little territory and there's ongoing localised conflict
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and the widespread a presence of islam must good option file and
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in between those two contrasting examples are very many different
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um localised political in components of context in the country
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uh and the south uh some some obviously has be no contains the
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most vulnerable population and considerable tensions between
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humanitarian and counter terrorism imperatives
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so cross this um wide and varied environment
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cash programming has developed and takes place
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i'm sorry can also be described as a transnational state where remittances
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are a major source of income forty percent of people
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um receive remittances at some point in the us some monthly someone an occasional basis
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and one in an estimated one in six of the population liverpool
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it's also very trade based economy actually so the market works in somalia
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and that's very important obviously in the context of class based programming
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and the requirements of remittances in try to driven the
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development of telecommunications and money transfer or infrastructure
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um so you have a lot of different types of organisations
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how efficient and reliable money transfer organisations that operate domestically
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an internationally and different uh mechanisms with different platforms to deliver in cash
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um as well as the political volatility in the conflict the climate is how evil the
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tile with regular so the rainfall for years we had a major rainfall failure
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major draft in two thousand and eleven that contributed to the famine at
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that time and we've got one at the moment it's um
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and another very important point is the
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long established ultimately entrenched political economy
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abated in somalia maybe something that we haven't spoken about very much
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i'm a it has been um the norm if you want in the country since the late
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nineteen seventy since this money ethiopia wall and a lot of interesting and complex dynamics of
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developed in that time but have incorporated international actors the un an
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international n. g. o.s as well as local actors the government
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local n. g. o.s into processes of corruption and don't
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version of i. so that's something that is really
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problematic and something that maybe will come up in in in some of the other talks
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um so the humanitarian operating environment in this context is
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characterised by remote management organisations operate out of
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no right to be and they operate out to the highly been could bases in somalia
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and this is again a major problem because there was a big disconnect at the
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moment to big distance between the headquarters of organisations and a field operations
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and then on the standing or common understanding of the context on the ground and as i said to deeply
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the list to size context where aid organisations have been incorporated couple
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to willingly or unwillingly into a political comic economy of a
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so
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oh i'm too so that's a little bit of a background on the context if you issues around the current crisis so we had a we
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had a major famine the largest famine in the twenty first century in two thousand in the happen and early this year we had
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warnings again of the famine of an impending famine that hasn't broken after a large scale
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yes but we certainly know that my nutrition light right so a highly elevated
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cholera outbreak something taking place and it's been massive a
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population displacement majored in several hundreds of thousands
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so in in this environment cash programming is in somalia is completely normal
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it's the default position basically people know how to do catch programming
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the bigger issues i think at the moment concern physical and social access
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to different populations and associated risks of corruption and by the vision
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so by physical access i'm referring to the fact that many of the most affected
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populations are living in areas on the the influence or control the bosch about
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and these are with the same populations that were most affected in two thousand an overlap and
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the same air is the same people are the ones that are most affected currently
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and ideally you would want to send resources into those areas to
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support populations to enable them what to try to restrict the
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movement to limit the need to move to other areas but
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there was the risk of legal in reputation all damage
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from uh resources going into the wrong hands uh craig's very risk averse and farm
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there are innovative ways of accessing areas under option about control but that's difficult to do what's going on
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it requires a high tolerance of words so that's a little bit about the visit a physical access
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in terms of social access then um a lot of people are moving out of these
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a us about control there is again as i did in two thousand and eleven
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to we get get to kenya and two other towns and cities in somalia
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and then you have a problem where the identities of the people the or moving
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the clans if you want to the people that uh maybe not different
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from uh the clans and the social identities all um the areas that they're moving to
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and therefore you start to get into very difficult problem with gate keepers
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gate keepers working for the u. n. and for international n. g.
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o.s as well as gatekeepers operating outside of the humanitarian sector
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and the populations of the most vulnerable to family in all typically marginalised populace
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and i'm not talking about small minority populations i'm talking about you know up to
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half of the population certain somalia can be considered a of marginalised identities
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so um so i think those are two very big problems over the kind of recognise that
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the moments people dealing with the macho attempting to deal with these issues at the moment
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but we've been working in see how if it twenty five thirty years and the fact that they are not part all all haven't been
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very much part of thinking and planning in that time
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and we're still struggling to work out these dynamics
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i think is very problematic and says something about institutional mare memory within the humanitarian sector
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so to conclude in to try to keep my presentations a short and also to relate it to some of
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the threads that i think of incoming authority uh three final points actually different from my initial conclusion
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one is just to mention new technologies we've heard so on several
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occasions the use of biometric systems in relation to cash
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a biometric systems may be useful in would uh reducing the risk of individual corruption
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but they tell you very little about when or if whole communities of being excluded from access
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to i. so there's a very big difference or or different applications of biometric systems
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also in the last session we had this expression of proximity to population
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and i think that's a really interesting and important um expression
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and in the context in somalia which is very complicated right to the to size and where
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we're working on a remote management basis we really have to question how much organisations
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or close to populations in terms of their relationships in terms of
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the uh the communication and the rap or in the trust
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but exists between organisations international local local populations i think
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they're big question marks around those types of relationships
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and finally uh in terms of the political context we put mention
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i'm a little bit about the matter in principle the principle of do no harm and i think that's one of the
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interesting in on the run ally used um perspective at the moment is that there is not enough
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analysis of the the local context in the way that
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organisations or incorporated into the local political economy

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Conference program

Opening
Nigel Timmins, Humanitarian Director, Oxfam International and Chair of CaLP Board
28 June 2017 · 9:09 a.m.
Formal Welcome
Manuel Bessler, Assistant Director General and Head of Humanitarian Aid Department, SDC
28 June 2017 · 9:48 a.m.
Looking to the future : Panel introduction
Christina Bennett, Head of the Humanitarian Policy Group, ODI
28 June 2017 · 9:56 a.m.
Looking to the future: Social Cash Transfer in Response to Ebola in Liberia
Gabriel Fernandez, National Social Protection Coordinator, Liberian Government
28 June 2017 · 9:56 a.m.
Looking to the future : MasterCard perspective
Ian Taylor, Vice President, Business Development, Government & Public Sector, MasterCard
28 June 2017 · 10:12 a.m.
Looking to the future : International Relations perspective
Jennifer Welsh, Professor and Chair in International Relations, European University Institute and Senior Research Fellow, Somerville College, University of Oxford
28 June 2017 · 10:30 a.m.
Q&A - Looking to the future
Panel
28 June 2017 · 10:37 a.m.
Operational Modalities : Panel introduction
Ben Parker, Senior Editor, IRIN
28 June 2017 · 11:08 a.m.
Operational Modalities : Sri Lanka experience
Sithamparapillai Amalanathan, Secretary, Ministry of Disaster Management, Sri Lanka
28 June 2017 · 11:10 a.m.
Operational Modalities : Turkish experience
Orhan Hac?mehmet and Jonathan Campbell, Resp: Coordinator Of Kizilaykart Cash Based Assistance Programmes, Turkish Red Crescent - Deputy Country Director, WFP, Turkey
28 June 2017 · 11:21 a.m.
Operational Modalities : Zimbabwe experience
Abel. S. Whande, Team Leader, Cash Transfer Program, Care International in Zimbabwe
28 June 2017 · 11:36 a.m.
Operational Modalities : UNHCR experience
Waheed Lor-Mehdiabadi, Chief of Cash-Based Interventions, UNHCR
28 June 2017 · 11:45 a.m.
Q&A - Operational Modalities
Panel
28 June 2017 · 12:01 p.m.
Scaling Up Cash In East Africa : Panel introduction
Christina Bennett, Head of the Humanitarian Policy Group, ODI
28 June 2017 · 1:32 p.m.
Scaling up Cash in East Africa: Nisar Majid
Nisar Majid, Independent Researcher, Consultant and Visiting Fellow, Feinstein International Centre, Tufts University
28 June 2017 · 1:32 p.m.
Scaling Up Cash In East Africa : ADESO perspective
Deqa Saleh, Cash and Social Protection Advisor, ADESO
28 June 2017 · 1:46 p.m.
Scaling Up Cash In East Africa : WFP perspective
Ernesto Gonzalez, Regional Advisor for cash-based programmes, WFP Bureau for Central and Eastern Africa
28 June 2017 · 1:52 p.m.
Scaling Up Cash In East Africa : Relief International perspective
Alex Gray, Global Humanitarian Director for Relief International
28 June 2017 · 1:58 p.m.
Cash Barometer and community perspectives of CTP in Afghanistan
Elias Sagmiester, Programme Manager, Ground Truth Solutions
28 June 2017 · 2:35 p.m.
First long-term trial of a Universal Basic Income, Kenya
Joanna Macrae, Director, European Partnerships, GiveDirectly
28 June 2017 · 2:44 p.m.
Changing from a pipeline to a platform
Paula Gil Baizan, Global Humanitarian Director Cash-Based Programming, World Vision International
28 June 2017 · 2:51 p.m.
Grand Bargain and GHD cash work streams
Emily Henderson, Humanitarian Adviser, DFID
28 June 2017 · 3:02 p.m.
Donor Perspectives : Panel introduction
Thabani Maphosa, Vice President for Food Assistance, World Vision International, World Vision US
28 June 2017 · 3:39 p.m.
Donor Perspectives : ECHO vision
Androulla Kaminara, Director, DG ECHO
28 June 2017 · 3:42 p.m.
Donor Perspectives : Office of Policy and Resources Planning's vision
Paula Reed Lynch, Director, Office of Policy and Resources Planning, Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration
28 June 2017 · 3:49 p.m.
Donor Perspectives : Norway vision
Ingunn Vatne, Minister Counsellor and Head of the Humanitarian team, Permanent Mission of Norway in Geneva
28 June 2017 · 3:58 p.m.
Donor Perspectives : DFID vision
Patrick Saez, Senior Adviser, Humanitarian Policy and Partnerships, DFID, UK
28 June 2017 · 4:08 p.m.
Donor Perspectives : Centre for Global Development vision
Jeremy Konyndyk, Senior Policy Fellow, Centre for Global Development
28 June 2017 · 4:22 p.m.
Q&A - Donor Perspectives
Panel
28 June 2017 · 4:39 p.m.
Closing Remarks
Alex Jacobs, Director, CaLP
28 June 2017 · 5:27 p.m.