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very much for the introduction and also thomas thank you very much for organising
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this one girl caught wonderful conference uh it's beyond expectations thank you
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so ah here we go uh with side effects of drugs
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uh the bad news uh in a medicine and i like to lead you through uh with a short introduction
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and then um lose a couple of words on data access address ability uh shows some clinical data
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and uh how to extract salient features from the clinical data and uh give
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a couple of examples and then the outlook where we go from here
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so uh we know that i've comes or the core target of medical diagnostics and therapies
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and it's always a question we've heard some uh uh questions about this today which data do we really rely on
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and uh my big issue is how can we operational lies
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our data to austin on to decide questions about outcomes
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i'm gonna talk about data here i mean data from routine clinical cactus
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so um there was a series of articles in nature uh not quite three years ago
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uh about uh the drug industry and uh it's a a clear that we
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show uh the drugs work before selling them and uh here it is
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uh the spectrum deregulation and the office here cautioned against deregulation this here yeah
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and even libertarian politicians in the u. k. like mac really
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caution against the regulation uh of her drug testing
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so um you want to drugs on the market um crowd you follow up on the drug is it really
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effective a war uh is it really safe and we do have a issues uh that
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we can solve with registries uh but i am a here is to uh
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usually structured data or too structured data so that one can perform
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post marketing studies that specifically to target organ diseases and also
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off label use of drugs drugs so uh this is an area
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which is very important and which we have very very few
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data on uh as i said except for the registries which are the best a way that we can track this
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now if we're in a department and we want to uh for for quality assurance uh tests
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how effective are drugs in real life and have frequent are on desired
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effects of drugs in routine here in my department and other departments
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and also our potential serious truck engine interactions considered in routine prescription
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uh for instance who considers a that patients navy on the staten when they prescribe call to see
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this is a very important question and which that and you prescribe if
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you're providing call to see what you need to change patterns
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also which sequence and there wasn't of drugs is optimal for have
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come we have huge databases of which you cannot address
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and we do not know the answer to the question uh en route arthritis for instance if you start with one drug and
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have a sequence of five next drugs uh will be do better uh with the if we change that sequence around
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so this is uh the these are unanswered questions that could have a huge impact on the way we treat patients
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so this is how conventional archive looks this was our condo archive
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uh in our i have five years ago and uh we um
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uh consider that this is a very good for routine here that looking for a bass
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twenty eights in this uh uh in such a system is very very difficult
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and uh this is essentially a data sick we take our notes we write reports and everything gets filed away
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and uh filed away to be forgotten after ten years uh it gets shredded if
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the patient doesn't come uh to the whole school again within that time
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do electronic data systems uh provide relief from this dilemma
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i mean we have here entry system where you can spend lots of time entering data you can't
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even get a report had of it uh but you've done your work at the machine
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and uh in the and uh if you can't address the data this is also a days
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as think uh just like the paper data and job you mentioned that before work
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uh that it's a terrifying that you have an electronic database and you can't even address the data that are in there
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so um we set had uh in r. l. i'm following um these premises that
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we wanted and unrestricted ability to migrate programs
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and databases on to new platforms
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uh this is because uh we had several systems from which we couldn't even extractor will be ports at
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the hospital and my experience and also before i moved to our i was exactly the same thing
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what are the problems was that uh these systems had propriety years in them
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could not get through to address your data so no proprietary stored systems
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and then of course would s. ability of data at blinding speed uh this is
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one of the google a premises uh don't you don't should not have to
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wait more than point three seconds for cancer uh if you query your system so
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what is the solution that we had we scanned our whole our archive
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uh we um use optical character recognition with pixel identical bit napping
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uh of uh these scans uh to identify the letters the words
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and uh we wanted to use this uh to have an automated recognition of
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the case from each sheet of paper that went into the scanning system
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so uh if stephanie brought souls uh she comes in for instance uh then the system
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would recognise stephanie brought so this is the this is this case and a
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ninety percent ninety seven percent correctness it would then um file this uh that the
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sheet of paper or whatever it is uh into uh the a database
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uh so this is a off the internet increments cans with automated case recognition
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and the solution that was has the selected was uh uh no
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s. q. l. data storage and and enterprise search engine
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a search ability of the database with the apache loose installer uh when you book a
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flight uh or you book your hotel uh or you or something i'm as on
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uh these uh um up uh these operations are always using a some type of
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search engine uh to um uh onto your queries and get your your best
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a room at the ritz and caress uh if you chose choose to go to paris
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for instance so what kind of data do we have had a roommate holiday department
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uh we have almost thirteen thousand patient files that we've uh we have addressable
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uh these are over two and a half million stand pages uh as
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i said with an o. s. q. r. database installer search ability
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and uh we can address the these uh uh the whole database with searches but
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we can also search within individual cases so for instance if i'm looking for
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prescription of a drug i can know back in the name of the drug
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and prescription and then the drug will come out on the prescription sheet
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so have questions looking lost here uh we had we looked at
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office internet how show a couple of uh data on that
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and uh this is uh the considered of potential interactions of coal
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to see in and little felix titans in routine prescription
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how many of our physicians uh to uh consider uh that they're a patients have a
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potentially harmful pretty medication uh which will interact with
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coaches scene then a method lexical rate toxicity
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other toxicity symmetric sate liver toxicity which is more
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frequent than probably from a a a toxicity
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and uh something that we also have an interest in is outcome of john sell our try to so that we can
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if the cat are cases of john sell arthritis and then a profile them clinically how does this work
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uh we have this uh o. c. r. um sir system you can put
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in your search word for instance that will chance effort to visit net
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um you can put hands l. jensen room that and then you can see uh
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we have eight uh eighty patients by now they're well over two hundred
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uh that you can find with the system and then you can put in the l. chance right sept
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uh uh a prescription and you'll find a prague uh fifty uh patients and these are uh
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precise uh searches and we'll see that the term is i found on
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or the combination of terms is found on a hundred and fifty five
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scans so this is what we can uh do to identify patients
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our cases and uh with that uh they can then be at the list of patients can be profiled
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and individual uh characteristics of these patients uh
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put into the table for statistical evaluation
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and what we can do a is then that together this is uh with me you can miller
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uh who did this analysis and in some tall and this is the now analysis of
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a hundred and forty four patients uh and you can see why it's itself chance or
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to visit neighbours stopped uh in if you can see that the most frequent reason
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um you can see the the median day to a stop in due to even if they can see a is around two hundred then
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you have gastrointestinal a side effects and then a side effects that become
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a more more infrequent uh but with this you can also
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find very very rare side effects uh within your whole database
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so um then to call just seen so uh what what we do with call to sing we know the minorities
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uh are increased control to see his code minister uh with little felix patterns
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and uh so what we're going to do is we're going to uh set up a protocol
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uh where we can uh search at all cases where coaches in isn't a is mentioned
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uh that's um in our case in our uh over to six hundred and twenty cases
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and in whom it was prescribed and also uh we will then look
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for existing prescriptions of a taurus that understand the staff and
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oh or think i'm new prescriptions which would be even worse
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yeah and uh we can then see what's the staten
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staten discontinued can call to sing was prescriber was an alternative staten prescribe
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uh so this is a very simple question that after a routine practised uh that in the medication which is
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a off label would not be possible to address a user the costs uh if you use other systems
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so that to a message lexical re toxicity we all know about probably toxicity the frequency that
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is given in the publications is point two from point three percent to over thirty percent
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in cases that get method checks eight and here are the uh kramer criteria from nineteen ninety seven
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uh that we can use it to identify these patients uh and
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uh then you have cousins of major criteria on one
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uh which is uh because the puddle pathological uh data or major criteria to and
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free radio logic evidence supple read the special or how the older infiltrate
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uh and then a block or in this just putting cultures negative for pathogenic organisms
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that's so these are the three major criteria and then we have minor criteria
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and then you can classify the patients as a definite or probable
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um uh pull re toxicity due to the drought metrics eight
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this is a bit superseded up here uh because at that time uh we
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did not have data on broken i'll be all the lab arches
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uh so uh we can use the this system as a screen for a database and
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then we can then uh adjudicate cases and the pull disease specialist and then say
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based on computerised demography uh off the longs and also the uh alveolar large results
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uh what uh the definitive uh classification is these uh uh a
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a list of search terms that we can use to
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make certain that we do have all the cases uh with
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metric say and potential pulley a side effects for evaluation
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and if you look at the flow chart here we have almost two thousand cases of metrics it mentioned in the database
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that we have a over a thousand six hundred that
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metrics exposures and a seventh twenty seven cases
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uh fulfil the creamer criteria exactly the same amount of uh patients that the six uh
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in is that participated in the elaboration of the tray a trainer criteria had at
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the time and these were then uh adjudicated by the pool were disease specialist
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and in the end uh we have eleven cases with definite probably toxicity
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three pays cases with probable up only toxicity uh
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so fourteen all uh and that amounts to
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i'm in a point eight percent uh all the cases uh that were uh exposed
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so this is a possible uh application uh of a searchable
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database uh in um uh like we've done in our
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so where do we go from here i mean this is one single centre uh it's nice to have
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a a nice number of cases um fourteen cases would pull re toxicity uh due to matter
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checks eight and uh we uh have uh from the star which is about here
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um and our our some call in and tell it so now uh put in the ground for a
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system that we can uh look at these issues in several hospitals so
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uh this is this create prima uh today there's gonna be a press
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release from the controls but helpless along uh in the style
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with your lucky uh as the lead a of this uh consortiums
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and here uh uh this uh the uh the topic of this uh project uh off as p. h. and
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uh is uh to create the infrastructure so that we can uh crossed
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his situations uh for evaluations like i've told before and in
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controls with ah ah so long as we have enterprise search engine address
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ability of practically all the data in the hospital they have
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three different clinical information systems they're a hundred and eighty thousand cases
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in there over three and a half million patient reports
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and six hundred million little retrieve data points and so what we're gonna do is we're gonna take our pulmonary disease toxicity
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uh evaluation and go into a controls b. tell the style
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and then a second phase will be able to go to the controls but also gallon which also has
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a special t. with allah g. unit and also into another language area uh in bellied so now
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and uh that part of this uh will be our uh twelve thousand
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eight hundred uh and drawing room apology cases in our our
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and our work tree is considerably larger than the one in the style
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uh with three mill three and a half million a data point
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sorry three and a half billion data points of almost three quarter of a million cases and for instance you
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can search the whole database uh with criteria for love or three parameters like trans iman is is
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and you can also look at this real time so if we have a link of a patient with metrics eight
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and we see that the trans am races in the lab and the lab rise uh we can have a flags
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so that's um uh the future uh but first we're going
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to look at our uh metric say toxicity cases
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uh within this database in the style and then go uh to some call and and to uh bellied so now
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so to summarise search engine access and analysis of real world medical data is feasible uh one kind
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identify and evaluate cases for clinical and study purposes
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uh this is a very important uh also for very rare diseases or
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very rare um the side effects of for instance not objects eight
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causes epilepsy uh in that extremely low amount of patients but we do
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have a case that has an epilepsy due to metrics aid and
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um we can uh use uh this a database for intelligent assistance
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uh to uh find these uh uh side effects and also evaluate the frequency of that they have
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uh and as i said uh the expansion over different data sets and other hospitals is imminent
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so thank you for your tension ha
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very nice kirk there are there any question for price so hard for
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it's so time
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so what i get an a warning um
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when the system detects antiques toxicity somewhere
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if they in your department or elsewhere up this is not definitely not the the the uh
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issue right at the moment but uh for instance at least half where the
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love or tree data or operational lies and you have real time
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uh accessibility uh if you set a troubling over two hundred we'll get on to the
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uh directly onto the smart phone of the cardiologists uh who was on call
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and uh this will even happen from the ambulance if it's from the point of care testing a gadget uh
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from the lady infusion they take the blood uh and uh twelve minutes later you have this problem
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so that's a uh that's possible with the system they haven't these tile
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unfortunately we started out and are on the style is far far ahead of what we are and i think that has
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several uh reasons one reason is that our hospital is also larger listening more difficult to get anything but through
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i have one question for for people who are not doctorate here
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has to not have to know that they're directory t. there an
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adverse effects usually have to be reported to systematic so
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you decide to to you know buy low but they're far
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fishermen take serve thirty minutes more or even more
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to report to fill in paper form aries and do you think your system
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and process could be used to automatically reports to cease maybe care
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uh that's a very good question that one thing i didn't mention here is that we have a semi automated
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in port of call medications and a co morbidity is
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uh into this table uh and uh once the
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lab data are accessible in our our uh we have discrete data points that are time stamped
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so we can construct a sequence of events uh based on the lab data
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even if there are gaps in the lab data and this is definitely something that can be uh that can be uh
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automated uh so you have a trend salmon is is you have the whole the lab data set you can actually
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transfers just medic if they want to have all that data uh and they can
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evaluate and so this is a this is all it's also possible to completely
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d. personalise the data to so that will be in you can take all
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identify as operations and also treating physicians uh practitioners out of the system
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thank you so we move around my room place and to welcome a doctor you i'm sure oh uh
00:19:13
working out there the repetition inner can your your mystical speak now and she will talk about the
00:19:20
impact of her a patient apps are on quality of
00:19:23
care and you know that quality of koreans are

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