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hi so uh thank you thank
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you for a inviting me
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uh thank you for this kind um introduction are i
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um i i've been asked to speak about sustainability
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oh yeah and i i have to open immediately that i'm not
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sure if i'm the right a person because there is something
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related to sustainability that i simply cannot and do not a stat is uh
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was a modern home in nineteen
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this was the house of the future this was something that pointed towards the future in nineteen forty eight it's
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all know this house please follow up on illinois the fronts with ours
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supposedly the biggest architectural masterpieces a twentieth century
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ah well ahead of its time uh and and in a way very liberating a
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product of modern architecture uh this is the house of the future today
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and it is a very strange thing that's something that is being heralded as good
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as a force for everything is that for good is visually so regressive that an
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interior that looks like sort of three hot has taken the place all
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more than interior made in the late forties a nearly sixty years and so um
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it's something we architect in particular a struggle and we struggle with the
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time this is a a home ah interesting we also uh
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home that looks very traditional but a home that is in every uh at least in in
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in performance terms in energy performance terms also a
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modern um so some somehow interesting the
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uh it does very well you can see here that it's heat leeks et
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cetera are are limited et cetera et cetera but there's an interesting
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thing that apparently the difference has come about between
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being modern looking and that which looks modern supposedly isn't not more than
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products are evaluated to criteria measurable criteria all the
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time every product can almost be a
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expressed in numbers can be expressed as a score uh is good when it takes a and x.
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number of boxes on all this uh you know the brie and uh and needs it
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search and if you were to measure me east today is
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beautiful house in panel would constitute an absolute ecological crime
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still the appreciation or at least my appreciation for just undiminished uh
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even knowing uh that's so it's just a very interesting
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paradox that we spend a lot of time thinking about it and that we don't have all the bounces green
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it's good green is also prolific this is short survey of
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all the products the market economy produces in the name
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of being green bay all literally green but we're also from very small
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products you look at the problems that are produced in the name
00:03:39
and you wonder is green really a commitment to a good
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cools ah or is it a fig leaf to preserve
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a lifestyle that we want to have any way and as well as we sort of green wash it
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sustained it cause has cats eloquent advocates here is one of them
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uh are not shorts and i in in california uh uh uh this is another
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advocate of the green a course in is by a pilot a sock
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oh but it's very interesting also that in a weird way it appeared to be the over privileged
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that's all the green cool or the green cause to the under
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privileged which i think on a global level is of course
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see similar isn't very strange irony this prince charles i
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strongly believes that lasts much of that firms aside
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well sometimes foreign material tons infinitely richer and what which and all that so
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it's it's lovely from a kind with an estimated value of i don't know how
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much but he finds rapport any fines people in agreement or industrial nations
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maybe they want our small as a message to the whole about all i
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try so it's it's it's this quote is interesting enough from um
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i mean the channel probably disagree on just about everything all
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the green calls like find wonderful uh a consensus
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another advocate from the status of its fossil fuel our
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personal private chat um norman foster our text file
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she is a bad as well i
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or at least in as a theory has the largest space that'd be noncommittal you couldn't you couldn't repeat this
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in dutch i don't think you could repeat this in german without being laughed at that in english it's
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the margins our largest ah so here is a product a a
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sort of very large he helped um i believe produced for
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uh it's in saint petersburg with all the appropriate diagrams of performance et cetera et cetera yeah
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huh that's what's the matter
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could you know i i yeah okay
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thank you and
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yeah the canada the contrast here i mean i i'm sure in this example because i mean
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yeah the appearance of the whole thing is so
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obviously wasteful is so obviously extravagance that
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that it's it's kind of the evidence of the opens its that is still practised
00:06:37
and apparently can be practised with the perfect rhetorical of sustainability this is
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must are uh the famous zero carbons city
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in the minimum switch meanwhile i think
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yeah the more gets build a more gets relies the less zero cotton it becomes to the point that it
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actually becomes a regular real estate a bunch of like
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anything else sustainability is a lot of tall
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uh i have a small anecdote i get asked to attend conferences like this a lot
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uh and i generally the dilemma is that i i also don't know what smart
00:07:16
cities are are and i used to think i was the only one
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until i found out that the whole point of these conferences was that actually probably nobody
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uh uh in the conference and certainly don't anybody speak it's knew what smart cities was but
00:07:30
that that was the whole point of liz again as a subject that is so
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wonderfully they uh that is the perfect networking opportunity because it's it's simply an alibi
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to talk about whatever you want to talk about new court small city
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so uh i get a a bit a bit of linguistic analysis we what you
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do in the digital age when you don't know me you go on google
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so i typed in sixty six and i can sort of relate with
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a more or less familiar type of images uh came up
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skyline some of the cities we've done projects in there maybe even buildings of us
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yeah in these images so here so far so good so i typed in smart
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now smart is a car smart is a smart car smartest a smart
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right so then i typed in the future
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and the future is a road sign yeah this reaches a recital simple google
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image intrude into a road sign to nobody knows where but somewhere so
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this is confusing stuff uh i mean everybody is confusing so so my google d.
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drive okay domes and some costs must have something to do with computers
00:08:51
uh so typing cost computers and i ended up with volkswagen diesel information
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oh for twenty some information in the middle uh of the volkswagen scandal where where
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which was like a perfect case where the where the digital was that
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just simply a perfect way to to when i was a big scam and and to fool uh people
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so i think this is a very complex thing because i mean there is ever more people
00:09:19
like this talking about the city in the city is an ever larger subject
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uh of the whole smart city a rhetoric so i went
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back to cities cities are uh and hope from home
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not to do since we got them as a material uh entity this is harper closer to most
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are uh on relies but we designed we deal with the the t. gritty yet though
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and stuff that cities are sojourn old phenomenon uh are
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nice sounds ideal city from the sixteenth a century
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uh of course the sixteenth century the fifteenth century rediscovery
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by uh people actually amount of each of the movie is a a man
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uh of course the human form the basis of roman cities
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uh later of islamic cities uh
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a revival during the renaissance
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curls away in the eighteenth century uh the garden city concert by
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nineteenth century another diagram of is
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merrick in the twentieth century but savings where the business of architects
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planners are and and people from previous was an architect
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in the twenty first century that changes this is a
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diagram i believe of cisco and we used
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to be a material entity is now an entity
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with the circle is a purely conceptual representation
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yeah and and where essentially the physical ingredients of the cities have been turned into words
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we should we turn to successive uh ideologies
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here ever increasingly esoteric the conceptual diagrams
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ah supposedly fourteen don't quite know war ah but a unique ability
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even if it's on certain uh what button ever they you're a subject you could say
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that what used to be a very precise designed focused effort by fifth reviews
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that's now essentially become an excuse to sell software
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and and hardware of digital firms there is
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at least in my point of view uh to pay architecture and architecture
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between quotation marks there is architecture which is the physical act
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of making cities making buildings but there is also a as you
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can see here architecture which is a purely metaphorical thing
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for the storms foundations structure framework
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platform arcade block scaffolding
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they're all terms that refer to physical elements of a building
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at the same time if you read any newspaper
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these terms or more often used in a purely metaphorical a sense
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it is that it's like architecture has become the folds
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uh in which all society expresses itself precisely at the
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moment it's completely no longer interested in physical for
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architecture so pantheon platform stay each construct digital et cetera
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uh it here the you that that the city
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used to be the domain where uh anybody from think reviews to record the shape
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used to express is utopian vision on what side society should look like shit which and how which
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leave it's currently uh actually collectively increasingly hound but
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tech companies here is a number of uh
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a a tech companies uh uh which in a way of programs
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uh on the cities they do what architectures to do right
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ah the right manifesto those uh on the city's
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very very confident manifested insistence three major digital
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companies that semen cisco and and i. b. m. and this is there a rhetoric smart c. d. rom
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but somehow not why because we live in a world of experience economic term
00:13:34
on climate change paging populism rapid recognise action but we also the
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is technological innovations that's true uh this is b.
00:13:43
m. climate change rising energy prices uh again
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a siemens organisation population growth climate change and dwindling resources so together
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are these uh entity seven enormously impressive program i mean they
00:14:00
profess to have the solution to all of these
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things which i think is certainly more than any politician maybe apart from paul problem
00:14:09
whatever profess to have the solution to button and nevertheless collectively they do and it is
00:14:15
very strange because this is a makes off the incorporate
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a couple except a couple ah so i'll
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well gotta nips a a predicted a
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and together with redemption offered by
00:14:31
if if one uses their technology and in a way the marketing formula
00:14:35
off this hops back to a very very old a technique
00:14:40
uh you know present the apocalypse and all for redemption joe or first twenty
00:14:47
it's essentially very biblical almost evangelical technique uh and it were funny
00:14:53
if if it were also not in a way extremely sad
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cisco a program for the smart city smart board rushmore
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buildings smart public services marketable that's so true
00:15:04
public safety social services education uh
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public administration finance purity transport healthcare uh together
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uh these uh uh companies or for a whole series of tasks
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which used to be the task before about the public sector
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but which now uh uh increasingly as an alternative they can
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do better and faster and and this makes you wonder
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whether the whole smart city is anything else but in the grass if right wing
00:15:38
privatisation program collectively protest by the industry
00:15:43
this is very interesting uh uh
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example maybe you know it it's uh the centre the address i was in
00:15:52
it's otherwise known as reuse digital town hall would so complex built by i. b. m.
00:15:58
uh where uh make sure of darpa uh and
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perseverance of the city's brought together so that in one centre the maximum
00:16:07
amount of digital available information of what goes on in the city
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at any time is assembled a and therefore can be acted upon uh the people with small
00:16:18
mass our control room in houston clearly so employees are forced to wear these kind of
00:16:23
johnson's uh while while looking at computer screens and and so they
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they they look at it and then look at rio
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and they see the rio is poor
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they see the rio asked for fell i mean you don't really need the c. c. t. v. a circuit to kind
00:16:43
of know that but nevertheless that's what they see and they
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see it on the computer screen but you really wonder
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uh what changes you really wonder uh you know whether the the the quick response
00:16:58
time to any calamities that happened there really help anybody because it's probably
00:17:06
it's a kind of symptom treatment that also takes away any
00:17:09
deeper commitment to ultimately maybe make these areas go away
00:17:14
uh to maybe actually do something far deeper uh about it is now you know you get in the you get
00:17:20
a a garbage java launch the public services or maybe slightly quicker there to clean
00:17:26
it up but otherwise nothing changes and it's a kind of very weird
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instrumentalists discourse that that takes increasingly the place of
00:17:35
a political discourse and in this sense
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i wanted to present another form of thinking in contrast which at the risk of
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being nostalgic 'cause it harks back to the last six
00:17:49
for me embodies the different uh type of thinking that you hardly
00:17:55
see or hear off in the whole sustainability debate uh richard
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buttons to fuller that utopia will you bloody and
00:18:03
spaceship earth uh it was a metaphorical project of buttons are for
00:18:07
where the earth as a whole was presented as shape
00:18:10
spaceship with limited resources once anti could not be were fuelled
00:18:16
i'm doing more most with the least i mean looking
00:18:20
for instance at re allocation of all the resource
00:18:24
spent on the american military uh if that were
00:18:27
the you know redirected to society uh itself
00:18:33
uh an interesting lee plans for a global uh energy grid which by
00:18:38
and large also ignored national or borders very interesting form of big
00:18:47
thinking which doesn't so much encounter technical borders per se but
00:18:53
which of course encounters political uh borders in the
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light of this and i want to show three uh of our own projects which in a way
00:19:03
uh all the folders uh thinking uh oh
00:19:08
this is a a problem a commission we go to look at the north
00:19:13
see i i can master plan for the north uh c. uh
00:19:18
based on on on energy provisions of the north sea
00:19:23
an interesting international territory a territorial waters
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share by five ah countries
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a a collective uh kind of exhaustion ground
00:19:36
for those five countries in terms of
00:19:38
are gaining will uh this is a survey of all the all platforms
00:19:44
i distributed over the country's collectively using this see a further and uh and benefit
00:19:50
uh these are uh this is a time line of of when uh
00:19:56
these all platforms will become obsolete some of them very very quickly
00:20:00
yeah and we were almost a buyer dutch and geo
00:20:04
to win away see if if the definition isn't energy reservoir
00:20:08
could be shifted from fossil fuel to potential wind uh production
00:20:14
um what we propose that this was an interesting opportunity was a
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ring that deliberately crossed the five territorial waters would represent shortcuts
00:20:24
uh in in the energy exchange between those countries 'cause you didn't you have to go via
00:20:29
land anymore but in a way to reinvent uh
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also symbolically deliberately trance crest five nationalities uh
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how that could you know wait trigger ah it it kind of marriage between eco
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and industrial productivity in a way that uh of course all
00:20:48
platforms never could uh so that's the kind of
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survey or or or it and uh in the middle of it uh
00:20:58
uh proposed research centre exactly at the crossing point of those five
00:21:03
nations which similar uh uh to of course the the the multinationals space endeavour
00:21:09
is would be unthinkable in this day and age or the current one
00:21:13
yeah but in a similar way was a multinational joint a collaboration
00:21:18
project between scientific institutes from the five countries at that
00:21:23
crossing point if that would work that combines uh
00:21:28
energy uh retinue of such an intervention
00:21:32
would actually rival the amount of total hours of the combined no will reserves
00:21:37
of the middle east and and there it becomes interesting because here
00:21:42
this will start to mess with geo political uh
00:21:46
balances and so we when we don't we
00:21:50
so this we very uh happy i mean we're we lay people but we work with
00:21:55
re technical people together on this and we never relies these numbers but impressively or
00:22:01
so i guess we got carried away uh imagine what if you do that not only uh with winds
00:22:08
but you can make a europe wide network that unites all forms of renewable energy thing couple
00:22:16
and just as we have done that actually a european uh and geo back into our office in
00:22:22
commissioned us to do exactly that and i don't know whether one preceded the other but i
00:22:27
think we even had the idea none somebody magically ah starts
00:22:30
i think that's out that but ah ah so um
00:22:38
this was the whole point in eighty percent of the whole going after the appeal agreement between
00:22:42
european governments uh the target wasn't eighty percent
00:22:45
admission a reduction before two thousand fifty
00:22:49
which could only be achieved with the power sector work
00:22:52
aggressively transformed from being dominated by fossil fuels
00:22:57
uh to being dominated by a alternative uh sources so the interesting
00:23:04
thing is diagram is that the energy consumption of europe
00:23:07
we'll continue to go up so there's barely any savings but the relative
00:23:12
share of the alternative energies will be vastly increased um huh
00:23:18
what's the main discovery of this project proposal for windows europe is already
00:23:22
doing a lot in terms of writable energy but europe is europe
00:23:27
so that means that every country sort of pursuing its own energy agenda is pursuing its own uh
00:23:34
a a source of energy so germany is pursuing solar system me it's pursuing wind
00:23:40
energy well probably it would make sense to do with the other way round
00:23:45
yeah but such is such is uh europe so we looked
00:23:49
at your and and the big what if of
00:23:52
this research project was was what if there weren't twenty eight energy policies but what if the one
00:24:00
what if you're a put three this a whole issue as though it were a single state
00:24:07
oh and then uh we could imagine uh because the whole
00:24:12
problem with renewable energy is much you rely on wind
00:24:16
you have no energy when we want your lyle song you have no energy when there's no song but if you link the two
00:24:24
yeah it's probably some somewhere when you have no windows probably when somewhere when you have no so
00:24:28
so the more the sources you link the more robust and the last four tiles system become so we imagined
00:24:35
especially station of regions and a connection between regions in
00:24:40
a way so that a certain amount of exchange
00:24:42
could be ah facilitated so ah extrapolating that i mean you could read europe
00:24:49
as a set of countries but you can also simply read your
00:24:53
as a as a a number of very different regions both
00:24:57
geographical and phonetically and see those regions as being suitable
00:25:03
for different type of uh energy so it's not in
00:25:05
the south i wind energy in the north sea
00:25:11
the title energy on the shores of the
00:25:14
atlantic ah by all energy from from
00:25:18
forest scene in eastern europe yeah geothermal energy i believe that was with someone
00:25:25
oh yeah yeah but anyway so we looked at your opinion away really conceptual lies
00:25:32
europe uh as a giant energy plot with the colours representing different for
00:25:38
of energy uh and as an act of provocation the main
00:25:42
calling card for the project became an alternative map
00:25:46
for europe with the twenty eight countries uh were replaced by a i i think about nine
00:25:52
energy regions which each carried the name of the specific energy the
00:25:56
geothermal yeah the title stay so laurie a hydro yeah
00:26:01
i think potent distant carbon capture storage right public
00:26:05
kind of pollution tool communist ah ah abbreviation
00:26:11
but anyway europe uh you know as a teen where where
00:26:15
where specific roles in terms of energy were allocated
00:26:18
the specific uh regions and interesting lee once europe
00:26:22
did that it would be interdependent by default
00:26:25
nobody could blacks it next it or get exeter anything because that would simply meeting
00:26:30
the channel the energy would be closed in this is interesting because of course europe emerged as the union of coal and steel
00:26:36
between france and germany uh as a clever ploy so that they could never go to war again
00:26:42
yeah but nobody spoke about that everybody spoke about coal and steel so the pragmatic
00:26:48
impetus there was an excuse to conceal larger political eight and then we'll was forty is you think of this
00:26:53
project was that if you simply define an energy project that you work on if you simply defined work
00:27:00
you have european integration but falls whereas if you talk about integration you'll need resistant nobody wants it
00:27:07
i work in any case is the best form of integration imagine
00:27:11
the best way to integrate is simply never to talk about
00:27:14
so this was a kind of slide we never presented a
00:27:17
kind of declaration of independence of inter dependence um
00:27:22
we imagined a a a transformation of european energy network currently
00:27:27
all the networks are connected but they're only connected via tiny links which only
00:27:32
serves the purpose of the case of an emergency so powerful even ross
00:27:37
uh if worst comes to worst like models i help them but we were
00:27:42
for that thing this kind of emergency connection we make that uh make
00:27:46
and in a way uh imagined a akin to a kind of
00:27:50
giant uh should network for york imagine the slow transformation
00:27:56
ah off the entire existing network into a network with the number of super highways
00:28:01
for energy uh linking countries so if you did that then the interesting thing was that you could
00:28:08
have provide europe with energy for about eighty percent with removals which is very impressive compared to
00:28:15
the meeker percentage that it's now if you wanna go to a
00:28:19
hundred percent you link you travel to the solar power
00:28:23
uh of north africa and you in a way in full of them in the
00:28:27
exchange with the exchange can involve more than simply in exchange of energy
00:28:31
but also probably a labour an industrial exchange which would seriously
00:28:36
probably benefit north africa more them then eight programs or anything else anyway
00:28:42
that africa has a lot of some uh north africa north africa in political terms
00:28:49
is also not democratic principle that a very crude political map blues democratic
00:28:55
right is to you don't have a lexus not democratic and yellows very interesting for political
00:29:00
category there you have elections but you know i was gonna win in the pots
00:29:06
so the sort of uh in between but anyway things when
00:29:09
we did this project things looked up i mean increasingly
00:29:13
dictators were were being ousted or killed or both
00:29:19
uh and and so for a while uh and this sounds at this point of course terribly naive
00:29:25
uh but sometimes i think it is important to be naive 'cause if you're naive
00:29:29
long enough maybe reality uh becomes somewhat more instances was the theoretical white area
00:29:35
uh i don't want to do is that we could then in a way use the arabs brain uh to improve
00:29:41
the in a them into that energy a network well we'll kind of no
00:29:47
uh what happened but that didn't stop us this is another very naive this police the problems two
00:29:53
thousand ten thousand ten two thousand eleven we did that which is not that long ago
00:29:58
uh this was another a test um notes to the arab world but fees of e.
00:30:04
russia uh when he taught at a school in in moscow we total project uh
00:30:10
uh based on this a european project that energy the usages
00:30:14
calls that okay we should go beyond one gas
00:30:18
russia is a big net exporter of well i guess this we all know it only gets
00:30:24
baker uh for about seventy five percent uh that export
00:30:29
goes to the european countries of the european
00:30:32
union ah and of course is perpetually lease effectively close the tap and they can hold us
00:30:41
ransom is often viewed as a real source of russian power
00:30:45
strangely if you look at it closely it's also actually real source of russian weakness
00:30:50
uh this is a a an overview of the russian oil reserves at
00:30:55
present work listed in two thousand eleven this is an overview
00:31:00
of the depleted or or servers which means that they
00:31:03
have to go ever further east ever for
00:31:07
into siberia to get will ever larger environmental cost i have
00:31:13
the look will a platform in ever more improbable ah
00:31:17
regions russia itself thus offers for something very interesting russia is big
00:31:26
but it's very thinly populated by one percent of its surface is actually
00:31:29
a inhabit it and built a seventy five percent of the rest
00:31:35
in urban areas they are all to the west of russia a a
00:31:40
large truck approaches uninhabited which means that the energy is guns
00:31:46
entirely different places than where it is retrieved which means that often internally in russia
00:31:52
energy travels distances which are for bigger than that just from problems german
00:31:59
massive difference it so there is a a kind of an energy deficit
00:32:03
and actually surplus organise it very different uh locations to the point
00:32:09
the entire at regions and half of that budget actually import
00:32:15
suppose you which a country this is an overview of the uh uh this is these
00:32:24
pipelines that will travel through so this is an overview of the amount of energy
00:32:30
we watched which means that only about twenty percent of all the theoretical energy
00:32:34
arrives at the destination because the rest of the energy simply walls
00:32:39
uh in transport being transported through a massively call it
00:32:43
i had harsh uh try not as you see here so
00:32:48
the previous president uh uh had a vision uh have actually an interest in
00:32:54
a um in in changing russia's energy base uh uh some won't
00:33:00
an illustration of what kind of old communist poster oh with the agrarian lantern into well
00:33:07
whatever the solar forms um and and we device that kind of similar uh
00:33:13
similar uh approaches we're done for your to russia to see whether that was possible
00:33:20
so to use the the russian great i mean uh
00:33:23
the communist state have introduced a massive massive uh
00:33:27
public uh energy infrastructure to see if uh
00:33:32
ah i remember actually would like wind energy could be used for that but also whether about the whole notion of by a few
00:33:38
little could be used in russia so that we could also make both great uh energy plan sort of an renewable energy
00:33:45
to be generated locally and this is important because despite rushes
00:33:50
massive energy great every still uh about fifteen percent or
00:33:55
which are more on the great which are either in remote locations
00:33:59
or actually in duchess settlements close to the big cities
00:34:03
uh which were always temporary settlements with people now live there permanently increasingly
00:34:07
so fifty percent of all russians without the grits and those two things with the the buyer fuel could play mass overall
00:34:14
in providing the fifty percent that wasn't that great so that
00:34:18
in theory a russia could develop and a surplus from
00:34:21
or noble energy to remain the same exporter as it is
00:34:24
now a fossil fuel ah this project wasn't executed
00:34:32
um and the last project we did a was a project for
00:34:36
the well uh off live a phone call ago very quickly
00:34:40
uh on on a a very aggressive scenario to get the whole
00:34:45
world a removable but two thousand fifty they did this
00:34:50
but partially theoretically uh looking at the amount of a
00:34:55
renewable energy locked up in the earth a geography
00:34:59
a present numbers but they combined is actually by a very aggressive energy
00:35:04
saving scenario as well from all the energy reports uh produced by
00:35:09
institutions like the w. w. f. this was by far the
00:35:13
most aggressive one in tuning down the earth uh energy consumption
00:35:18
with the philosophy that if you maximise just natural resources
00:35:24
and minimise consumption over time the the moment that the two curves intersect
00:35:29
would be sooner so to prison very aggressive deadline uh and and very aggressive saving scenario
00:35:36
it's partially dictated by another advert uh of the w. w. f. which
00:35:41
was an aggressive resistance against drilling for oil in the arctic
00:35:45
a region that was their reason to start this project with a
00:35:49
microphone some us of course the arctic uh is is very
00:35:54
rich it will uh but the arctic ice cap melting
00:35:59
it's of course a byproduct of the use of also in a way the articles doubly fucked you could you could say
00:36:07
ah the race farting well between the nations around the arctic of course you
00:36:12
america planted it's flag on the moon or russians part of it's life like from your all
00:36:17
uh to make a rust proof a flak place
00:36:21
by robot a broad cross on russian television
00:36:25
ah and and we looked in in in a lot of this project at the arcade
00:36:31
in a very different way of course the rain that's around if you look at the earth summit talk
00:36:36
you don't have the markup or projection yeah that meeting yeah um is is actually
00:36:41
relatively small of a distance and we looked if we could make the beginning
00:36:47
uh all of of using the north pole the ring around the north pole
00:36:51
as in a way that connecting between the energy creates a lot of
00:36:55
countries but of continents of in the way an escalation uh of the thinking
00:37:00
uh that was the climax in projection which is in a way
00:37:04
and i've here one of the ideas that fuller developed in the nineteen sixties uh
00:37:09
at the time for auto uh but here actually applied to removal uh energy
00:37:15
thinking it is science now finds it can be ample for all
00:37:18
but only if the server fences are completely removed so
00:37:23
a modern version of an all thought you could say um i'd like to
00:37:27
end on a one on on exactly that point the the world
00:37:33
facing a a collective a problem we we know the inconvenient truth from al
00:37:39
gore point being that if we carry on the way we do
00:37:42
c. levels rice and a certain amount of land mass uh
00:37:46
of the world will i become a an inevitable
00:37:52
this we know but there is an interesting trend or an interesting development happening in the world in parallel
00:37:59
and that is the trend of organisation more more people are living in cities fewer and fewer people
00:38:05
are living in rural areas if you do the same al gore map uh not all
00:38:12
flopping out of thinning of framing of human annotation to get very
00:38:16
interesting reversed right yeah i we called another inconvenient true
00:38:23
yeah this is what remains of the world if you want a
00:38:26
midnight or areas with fewer than twenty five persons sparkle
00:38:32
this is what you do when with less than fifty percent since what remains unpleasant long twenty five persons
00:38:38
yeah and this yeah anything under a hundred persons actually doesn't
00:38:42
qualify as urban according to the market can maybe enough
00:38:46
so in a way that is what remains that that is the that's just the ernest world
00:38:51
uh this ace the mega city regions as
00:38:55
they're all the emerging big conglomerates
00:38:59
of large cities from a boston washington new york other on starts
00:39:05
or want the pro revert else et cetera et cetera mexico city
00:39:11
and uh yeah that's an interesting thing because this case three percent of the earth surface
00:39:17
all those mega cities combined or three represent three percent of the earth's surface
00:39:22
sixty six percent of all economic activity eighty five percent of all scientific the innovation
00:39:29
these are these various and if you look at how course map of la
00:39:36
with pinpoint accuracy these areas are in the areas that will be flawed
00:39:42
which means that in a way the future of of urban
00:39:47
the home of dos expertise but it's a very good thing um but of
00:39:53
course it's a very worrying saying and a few of course thing back
00:39:58
of the whole bit house or shade in the beginning of the whole house lawfully
00:40:03
small scale coke green coca cola cat uh et cetera and you think
00:40:07
of the real scale of the problem there is a kind of looming absurdity
00:40:11
in our thinking about sustainability is that we've never been more aware
00:40:17
but never before has our scale of intervention actually been smaller
00:40:21
which is ridiculous so anyway my proposal would be a
00:40:26
a form of thinking big really tackling thing
00:40:31
i'm probably bigger than any nation or continents can handle which is in a way and aggressive pretty
00:40:37
for a kind of multilateral a few of paula politics the word police
00:40:43
it's nice city yeah in greek you know break from
00:40:47
it comes the world politics we currently live
00:40:50
in the age of the make a lot boneless so perhaps it is time that we practised

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Conference program

PRÉSENTATION DE LA JOURNÉE DE SÉMINAIRE
Panos MANTZIARAS, Directeur, Fondation Braillard Architectes
8 Dec. 2016 · 9:10 a.m.
ALLOCUTION
Antonio HODGERS, Conseiller d’État chargé du département de l’aménagement, du logement et de l’énergie (DALE), République et canton de Genève
8 Dec. 2016 · 9:11 a.m.
INTRODUCTION
Panos MANTZIARAS, Directeur, Fondation Braillard Architectes
8 Dec. 2016 · 9:24 a.m.
ABRIS D’URGENCE À GENÈVE
Philippe BONHÔTE // Ivan VUARAMBON, Architecte, professeur, Joint Master of Architecture, HES/GE-HEPIA // Architecte, chargé de missions auprès de la DDC
8 Dec. 2016 · 9:46 a.m.
129 views
VIVRE DEMAIN LA VILLE DE BASSE DENSITÉ
Nicolas TIXIER // Jennifer BUYCK, Architecte, professeur, École nationale supérieure d’architecture de Grenoble // Architecte, maître de conférences, Institut d’urbanisme de Grenoble
8 Dec. 2016 · 10:15 a.m.
RÉPONDANTS : VIVRE DEMAIN LA VILLE DE BASSE DENSITÉ & ABRIS D’URGENCE À GENÈVE
Dominique BOURG // Rémi BAUDOUI, Philosophe, professeur - Institut de géographie et durabilité, Faculté des géosciences et de l’environnement, Université de Lausanne // Sociologue, professeur - Département de science politique et relations internationales, Université de Genève
8 Dec. 2016 · 10:44 a.m.
SUSTAINABLE AND RESILIENT URBAN INFRASTRUCTURES - INSIGHT FROM CASE STUDIES
Katharina SCHNEIDER ROSS // Marco GROSSMANN, Deputy Executive Director - Global Infrastructure Basel // Director Implementation Services - Global Infrastructure Basel
8 Dec. 2016 · 11:42 a.m.
PROJET ATLAS - ATLAS DE DÉVELOPPEMENT DURABLE POUR L’ESPACE ALPIN
Peter DROEGE, Architect, professor, Liechtenstein Institute for Strategic Development
8 Dec. 2016 · 12:08 p.m.
RÉPONDANTS : PROJET ATLAS - ATLAS DE DÉVELOPPEMENT DURABLE POUR L’ESPACE ALPIN
Pascal ROLLET // Robert SADLEIR, Architecte, professeur, École nationale supérieure d’architecture de Grenoble // Économiste - Westminster University
8 Dec. 2016 · 12:35 p.m.
ATLAS ARCHITECTURAL D’ÉCONOMIES CIRCULAIRES
Grégoire BIGNIER // Peggy GARCIA, Architecte-ingénieur, chercheur, Laboratoire LIAT, ENSAPM // Architecte, postgrade EPFL - Maître assistant associé, ENSAPM
8 Dec. 2016 · 2:52 p.m.
108 views
SCENARIOS FOR A COLLABORATIVE CITY SUSTAINABLE UTOPIA OF THE POLYCENTRIC RUHR REGION
Alexander SCHMIDT, Architecte, professor - Institute of City Planning + Urban Design, University Duisburg-Essen
8 Dec. 2016 · 3:18 p.m.
RÉPONDANTS : SCENARIOS FOR A COLLABORATIVE CITY SUSTAINABLE UTOPIA OF THE POLYCENTRIC RUHR REGION
Sabine BARLES // Gunther VOGT, Ingenieure, professeure - Universite Paris I, UMR Geo-Cites // Paysagiste, professeur?Institut fur Landschaftsarchitektur, ETHZ
8 Dec. 2016 · 3:49 p.m.
URBAN LIFE FOR SUBURBIA - THE TICINO CASE
Frédéric BONNET, Architecte, professeur - Académie d’architecture, Mendrisio
8 Dec. 2016 · 5:10 p.m.
ALPS - PROTOTYPES FOR THE ALPINE CITY-TERRITORY
PAOLA VIGANÒ, Architecte-urbaniste, professeure EPFL et IUAV, directrice du laboratoire Lab-U/ EPFL, membre fondateur de l’agence Studio 16, Milan
8 Dec. 2016 · 5:43 p.m.
140 views
RÉPONDANTS : DENSUISSE - RECHERCHE PROSPECTIVE SUR LA DENSIFICATION DE L’ESPACE URBAIN SUISSE
Pascal ROLLET // Günther VOGT, Architecte, professeur, École nationale supérieure d’architecture de Grenoble // Paysagiste, professeur Institut für Landschaftsarchitektur, ETHZ
8 Dec. 2016 · 6:13 p.m.
CONFÉRENCE / KEYNOTE SPEECH // CURRENT PREOCCUPATIONS
Reinier DE GRAAF, Architect - Office for Metropolitan Architecture, Rotterdam 8 DÉCEMBRE 2016
8 Dec. 2016 · 6:39 p.m.
QUESTIONS // REPONSES
Reinier DE GRAAF, Architect - Office for Metropolitan Architecture, Rotterdam 8 DÉCEMBRE 2016
8 Dec. 2016 · 7:21 p.m.

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