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so thank you very much training yeah but i think uh that i think that what you just said and expressed and
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showed these perfectly pertaining to what we've discussed today even mobile
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phones of you know it's amazing you you didn't
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there probably were you would have to have the the patients to be
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for as computing today but a the questions you raised that have been discussed again again today and of course
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we have no answers a your um approach which is
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of course at the same time and political
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aesthetic ironical of course which is good because certainly you sort of
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you know of a sensor series of a heavy burdens about
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two simple simple symbolic to stuff and uh yeah um
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and the s. him since of a responsibility which is existing but if
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we think too much of it we lose we would become
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and we're sort of blocked so therefore uh what i would suggest first of all
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is to have some questions if there are some questions from the public
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what anybody have any common question ah
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so they start with a quick question maybe well people are thinking how this first uh project where
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the very first product about energy come to your mind so to your to your tables
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yeah we we were hostile dutch um n. g. o. uh and dutch environmental
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the organisation who wanted to oh actually locally
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for removal energy and who cost us
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to look at the dutch territory not only with the land mass but in a way to involve the
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the part of the north sea that is supposedly dutch uh_huh so then the numbers go very funny shape
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oh yeah and uh which we thought was interesting because we do lots of master plans
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with a lot of urban planning but there was a land i mean the c.
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the black or a nonexistent break so we thought that was interesting the notion of a
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mosque plan for the c. was an interesting annotate not so that course interested
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but then we thought but it's ridiculous to relate this to the dutch part so we look at more than what c. and then
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that is actually that we found these different slices like a pie chart
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of countries and then we suggested to that button should be bigger in
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the netherlands so we we had this suggestion to scale up
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which they then went along with and from that moment that the kind that project okay
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um
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any other questions before i
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and then there's all of was lots of talk today about how
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we can make things change faster sense of time or of
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lack of the time in front of what this coming up was very strong in the
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group of people wondering how we can make heaven quicker impacts on the way we
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jane would have been a better uh okay management of the territory in your office and omar i'm oh
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uh is there any method you found works generate
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a little bit good conscience making hand
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but the projects but i mean there's a difference i mean the the whole point of
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allows diagram the scale of one to seven scale action shows exactly that i mean
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creating consciousness uh about is one thing but
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to implement that consciousness is another thing
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everybody it's not rocket science i mean everybody knows that this
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problem is bigger than any company country or entity consoles
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nevertheless the the the the the compartment illustration
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yeah it's society particularly society that is based on mutual competition
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to the degree that it is is of course such that invariably oh
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you run into limits of your uh a proposal and this is it i mean of course this happens
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when you propose your white energy network but this events happens with small projects
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in the netherlands so even a strangely that phenomena means that even the smallest things
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run into those walls which for me it simply means that was for uh for us
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was was very important presented as a political problem because once the political problem is somehow
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addressed and i'm sure a lot of things can also go very very quickly
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but there is a a kind of bottleneck and then to say because of course what we
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show long term solutions but then to so rendered to that and say so let's
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good short term solution because anything else will work which means you never
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get to the crux of the problem and you keep the bottleneck
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and the both will get smaller and smaller and smaller that even at a certain moment short term solutions get caught up
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yeah i am i
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your project what's gonna shoot no you're wrong distant
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so what you do you do with your right to know each what is the next step
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uh what with three uh you wish it something a
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different uh i think the first and geo
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i spoke to a lot of uh uh a sheer despair i think launched an advertisement
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a a lot of uh uh i think the e. seconds uh and
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she which was your climate and actually is a very uh aggressive
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lobby organisation ah russell's which actually is working and
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he's still working on making a your
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project happen to organise thing that frequently used to bilateral talks a very uh
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three i initially went to your
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which created a kind of an impossibly cute face it's up to the member statements that
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christie you process about every client is that i sat down uh
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a place that now poland and germany
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and make that connection
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subject of bilateral poll which is all quicker and then you sit down germany and number
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they provide what i've done is taken all
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that work uh dissected shortcuts between countries
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and and and work on those so that the whole thing would be faced over time and maybe it was
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also slow project but the interesting thing is they did not there is
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a process that is ongoing all ah the well while you know
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ah finally they they you know why are the perfect example ah
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expression knowledge which is that there is a difference uh between being right and being proven
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mm writing in a way
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my personal view point that difference you know
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yeah
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oh my
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but that's a simpler discovered this activity of your office i didn't know about that's all
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um i want this and saying that you ended your conference
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on the political no it's a and obviously um
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on the scale of your projects it is uh
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to call being um wanted to ask your opinion about this um
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you're right
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okay
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i'm
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uh_huh
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third one i know
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sorry i'll want to toss their opinion about what's what's was
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i've found that are found very little this cost they which was
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the financial sector and it's well and organise and me we noted
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i don't know three quarts of things bills or
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by the financial sector for speculation anyway
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they escape all sorts of fuels are i mean municipalities an urban
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urban roles they chase them up at exactly like politicians that
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they changed the operations them i've the financial sectors years and years later
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after they've they've been uh want to toss your opinion about oh
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to get to some sort of sustainability uh m. g. s. two
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we have to go through legislation to limit the actions of
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people who have other objective some other aims or
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what you think doesn't go through researching uh materials or roles or what
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i think that it strangely and it's it's it's very um
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it's probably very it again naive to make this argument in the current political
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wait that's blowing everywhere but i think the only answer to this is is
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a degree of multilateral isolation what you see is that uh with localisation
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corporations of become aggressively international which means that any i have another presentation where
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i believe the chairman of google uh the fence attacks torch from google any calls of capitalism
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oh which i thought was interesting what you see there is that if you know before ninety nine
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as a certain amount of royalty that could
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be presumed with corporate corporations and financial
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institutions to the country of origin but localisation has remove that last bit
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of loyalty and strangely there for the twenty first century looks like the nineteenth
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century uh a number of things that we thought the twentieth century solved
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return in the twenty first century the the child labour was very hard to
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the bosch in the nineteenth century because if i don't do it
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my neighbour will do it if i'm able duty can produce cheaper he
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will kill me as a competitor we have exactly the same situation
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globally with the but the difference that it's not our neighbours but for everyone as an actor
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we have neighbours with completely different standards again so after the initial homo generalisation
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of of standards of legislative standards in the west we currently have
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a new situation where we have global us our economy
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and not global lies the rules uh i in the same way which means that there are so many
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i mean their tax loopholes but there's also any x. amount of local simply not to comply
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with even global oh arrangements and i think the only way for what is
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through international protocols which at the moment everybody seems to be the light it
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uh uh to retreat from so it's it's it's a very uphill battle never the less i think that
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is the fundamental more modern isolation that the twenty first century should bring if
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you know if if uh if if twenty one hundred is not to
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look like nineteen hundred uh that's the fundamental challenge uh ahead
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question if you sir
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i i um i really enjoyed the uh the idea of the declaration of independence and this kind of notion of
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like larger global systems but i was wondering out of kind of time where you some british i'm british
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okay i guess i'm afraid um i was wondering especially for those kind of
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remarks about um the breaking down of this idea of seventeen fences
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when exactly the opposite is now happening my country included and
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america building walls this talks of a in a in
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france and you know when this nationalism is occurring but when exactly what we need is this idea of
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globally interdependent systems what's your kind of take online something
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this again it's another regression socially and politically now
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well that's exactly my take
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registering that that that that this is definitely or regression and the only
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thing i can say is that i hope that it shortly it
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you know that it's not a very long winter but i i think
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another front where strangely it it it many times it mean if you look at the history of the
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twenty first century so far it seems the twentieth century all over again that played in reverse
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it's like you have your video recorder and you and you do it on the on all the fast rewind
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the and and that is what you get and it's mass summarising that the past is never dead apparently
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donna very relevant question i mean i'm just thinking in the scale of
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the nation state is just one scale of organising resources right
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and we we so your and your presentation you know how these
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self sufficiency idea of resources blink is playing elton difference kate
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we certainly scale of fashion this kind of europe this kind of the world
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and i'm wondering if the user like a a right scale for these doesn't have to be global can it be let's
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say at the continental scale can be at the regional scale i mean what what i don't have to be
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a global interdependence and it cannot be something else but the the thing it's not i mean
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what exists i mean it's not something we propose i i i think
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the global reality of the moment is that it is highly interdependent at
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that nobody could just fair its own course that's a complete
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myth so it's an interdependence is not a proposal at the decoration of interdependence
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is also not a declaration of course it is a recognition of uninhabitable
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fact and uh and and assuming that any solutions starts from facts that that is a a
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given but i don't think it's necessarily i mean there's of course the difference between recognising
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something as global and and we're proposing a blanket solution or proposing
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an identical speed to a transformation i think there of course
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parts of the world's where problems are so severe
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that of course thinking about yeah sustainability or separating ways is a complete
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uh illusion every uh a lottery so to hold it
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to those places accountable to the same standards
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as other places is of course ridiculous but that is not to say
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that in recognising that the problem is any less global 'cause in the
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end their problem is our problem her problem is their problem
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and that is it and i think that the mean the the the middle angie oh the one of the european uh
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a project i think that's something really really clever is that they have this thought
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uh as vision of european integration the but they probably don't even when they talk to germany or poland the
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probably don't even share that european project they simply talk
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to germany and potent and demonstrate the mutual benefits
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and then they go to another they uh other much major benefits and sometimes big agendas
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are best served by not talking about them so that's is maybe what i
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do is highly counterproductive uh but this is a small audience so uh
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it's a small audience but i think there's lots of energy inside i am
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the director or should know so i'm a what don't think
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we would have a a better ending of this day
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thank you so much or near for this a accent conference thank you everybody for being all these day to day
00:17:05
so so therefore see you in a year from now for the next third
00:17:09
a geneva saner and with the results of these first group of research in the meantime will keep you posted
00:17:15
on the development of a and the activities of the value

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Conference program

PRÉSENTATION DE LA JOURNÉE DE SÉMINAIRE
Panos MANTZIARAS, Directeur, Fondation Braillard Architectes
8 Dec. 2016 · 9:10 a.m.
ALLOCUTION
Antonio HODGERS, Conseiller d’État chargé du département de l’aménagement, du logement et de l’énergie (DALE), République et canton de Genève
8 Dec. 2016 · 9:11 a.m.
INTRODUCTION
Panos MANTZIARAS, Directeur, Fondation Braillard Architectes
8 Dec. 2016 · 9:24 a.m.
ABRIS D’URGENCE À GENÈVE
Philippe BONHÔTE // Ivan VUARAMBON, Architecte, professeur, Joint Master of Architecture, HES/GE-HEPIA // Architecte, chargé de missions auprès de la DDC
8 Dec. 2016 · 9:46 a.m.
129 views
VIVRE DEMAIN LA VILLE DE BASSE DENSITÉ
Nicolas TIXIER // Jennifer BUYCK, Architecte, professeur, École nationale supérieure d’architecture de Grenoble // Architecte, maître de conférences, Institut d’urbanisme de Grenoble
8 Dec. 2016 · 10:15 a.m.
RÉPONDANTS : VIVRE DEMAIN LA VILLE DE BASSE DENSITÉ & ABRIS D’URGENCE À GENÈVE
Dominique BOURG // Rémi BAUDOUI, Philosophe, professeur - Institut de géographie et durabilité, Faculté des géosciences et de l’environnement, Université de Lausanne // Sociologue, professeur - Département de science politique et relations internationales, Université de Genève
8 Dec. 2016 · 10:44 a.m.
SUSTAINABLE AND RESILIENT URBAN INFRASTRUCTURES - INSIGHT FROM CASE STUDIES
Katharina SCHNEIDER ROSS // Marco GROSSMANN, Deputy Executive Director - Global Infrastructure Basel // Director Implementation Services - Global Infrastructure Basel
8 Dec. 2016 · 11:42 a.m.
PROJET ATLAS - ATLAS DE DÉVELOPPEMENT DURABLE POUR L’ESPACE ALPIN
Peter DROEGE, Architect, professor, Liechtenstein Institute for Strategic Development
8 Dec. 2016 · 12:08 p.m.
RÉPONDANTS : PROJET ATLAS - ATLAS DE DÉVELOPPEMENT DURABLE POUR L’ESPACE ALPIN
Pascal ROLLET // Robert SADLEIR, Architecte, professeur, École nationale supérieure d’architecture de Grenoble // Économiste - Westminster University
8 Dec. 2016 · 12:35 p.m.
ATLAS ARCHITECTURAL D’ÉCONOMIES CIRCULAIRES
Grégoire BIGNIER // Peggy GARCIA, Architecte-ingénieur, chercheur, Laboratoire LIAT, ENSAPM // Architecte, postgrade EPFL - Maître assistant associé, ENSAPM
8 Dec. 2016 · 2:52 p.m.
108 views
SCENARIOS FOR A COLLABORATIVE CITY SUSTAINABLE UTOPIA OF THE POLYCENTRIC RUHR REGION
Alexander SCHMIDT, Architecte, professor - Institute of City Planning + Urban Design, University Duisburg-Essen
8 Dec. 2016 · 3:18 p.m.
RÉPONDANTS : SCENARIOS FOR A COLLABORATIVE CITY SUSTAINABLE UTOPIA OF THE POLYCENTRIC RUHR REGION
Sabine BARLES // Gunther VOGT, Ingenieure, professeure - Universite Paris I, UMR Geo-Cites // Paysagiste, professeur?Institut fur Landschaftsarchitektur, ETHZ
8 Dec. 2016 · 3:49 p.m.
URBAN LIFE FOR SUBURBIA - THE TICINO CASE
Frédéric BONNET, Architecte, professeur - Académie d’architecture, Mendrisio
8 Dec. 2016 · 5:10 p.m.
ALPS - PROTOTYPES FOR THE ALPINE CITY-TERRITORY
PAOLA VIGANÒ, Architecte-urbaniste, professeure EPFL et IUAV, directrice du laboratoire Lab-U/ EPFL, membre fondateur de l’agence Studio 16, Milan
8 Dec. 2016 · 5:43 p.m.
140 views
RÉPONDANTS : DENSUISSE - RECHERCHE PROSPECTIVE SUR LA DENSIFICATION DE L’ESPACE URBAIN SUISSE
Pascal ROLLET // Günther VOGT, Architecte, professeur, École nationale supérieure d’architecture de Grenoble // Paysagiste, professeur Institut für Landschaftsarchitektur, ETHZ
8 Dec. 2016 · 6:13 p.m.
CONFÉRENCE / KEYNOTE SPEECH // CURRENT PREOCCUPATIONS
Reinier DE GRAAF, Architect - Office for Metropolitan Architecture, Rotterdam 8 DÉCEMBRE 2016
8 Dec. 2016 · 6:39 p.m.
QUESTIONS // REPONSES
Reinier DE GRAAF, Architect - Office for Metropolitan Architecture, Rotterdam 8 DÉCEMBRE 2016
8 Dec. 2016 · 7:21 p.m.

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