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first of all I'd like to thank the
organizers for giving me the opportunity
to talk about our appeal switzerland and
so as you all know RP is a severe
complication of period at preterm birth
commuters on the screen here let's move
over here is a severe complication of
preterm birth but the incidents of ROP
or an RP treatment switzerland is
largely unknown and furthermore we know
that the ROP screening criteria differ
between countries and also between
different between centers in Switzerland
so the aims of our study was first to
analyze ROP treatment and are pretreated
incidents in Switzerland and the second
a monster sets of screening criteria can
be optimized methods were that we use
MDS data manipulated the data set data
meaning all patients born in Switzerland
with low 32 weeks after stations age and
we use data on patients bond within 2016
2015 for the second aim to analyze
screening criteria we developed a new
model and we used logistic regression
analysis of 50 computer databases for
all children born between 2006 in 2012
then we developed a model including
several risk factors for ROP and will be
stepwise eliminated a the risk factors
for lower predictive value and we came
up with seven known risk factors little
included in the model and we applied the
bottle on patients bond between
2013-2015 to see if we can really
predict the patients who develop RP
treat or needed treatment later on in
our database between 2006 in 2015 with
7870 in preterm infants below to 32
weeks of gestational age
the first problem we had was that we had
more than 1,000 patients who did not
data recorded on RP so we tried to track
down the patients and to complete the
datasets and we are able to complete
1942 of these datasets and so we came up
with only 2.2% of missing data which was
quite satisfactory I think that's what a
lot of work took us more than a year to
track down all these patients but i
think it was worth it and coming to our
results on the right hand side just
we'll start with this one is Rp
incidence in England published 2014 and
we see that the ROP treatment incidents
is increasing after 2005 and is also
published other studies but if you look
on the left side this is our data we see
between 2006 in 2015
there is no in no increase of ROP
treatment we have ROP treatment in the
study population between 0.8 percent in
2015 and 2.0 percent in 2010 looking a
little more closely at data stratified
by educational age we see of course that
patients with lower gestational age 24
weeks at RP intervention 14.5 percent 25
weeks of gestation at 7.3 percent and
the other ones at a lower incidence of
ROP treatment
overall the RP treatment was 12.2
percent of this patient group which is
much much lower than published in other
countries for example in Germany there's
a studies showing three-point-nine
percent treatment in these patients if
we look at these patients 29 30 31 weeks
this is more than half of the population
group and we see the incidence of ROP
treatment is between 0.1 0.2 percent so
this means we're screening this paper
population more than 99 of the percent
of the patients are necessarily because
there's no further treatment and we
apply pain and stress for the patients
and we don't have a consequence
so the question is can we define these
patients or identify these patients more
precisely and we don't have to screen
all of them
like I said before we developed this
model of patients on between 2006 in
2012 and we have respectively applied
these model we received on patients bond
between 2013-2015 between 2013-2015 with
a little more than 2,000 preterm infants
in the database in nineteen of them so
less than 1% were treated for ROP if we
look at these data we see of these 19
patients if we want to have 19 true
positives the sensitivity of one person
one hundred percent or 1.0 we need to
test all of them
this is quite disappointing that we did
not come up with the clear model this is
easier to identify these patients
however if we have one false negative
and 18 true positives sensitivity of
94.7 percent we only have to screen here
sorry we only have to screen 281
patients meaning only thirteen percent
of the patients needed to be screened to
have a sensitivity of 94.7 point further
malformed or this one patient we missed
had a congenital never stoma so probably
different physiology with high levels of
growth factor sensible in the blood and
probably higher risk factor for
developing RP so this is the result of
our body to the moment I think we can
continue to develop a more precise model
and test the model prospectively this
would be the same for the next year's so
I'd like to conclude that the rate of
ROP treatment does not increase increase
over time the rate of ROP treatment
switzerland is low its one-point-two
percent for all patients below 32 weeks
after station h is 0.1 percent of
patients between 29 and 31 weeks and it
might be as possible to optimize
existing ship screening criteria and
exact model on screening criteria should
be developed and tested prospectively so
thank you very much and
happy to take questions

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Conference program

Welcome Words
M. Roth-Kleiner, R. Arlettaz Mieth
10 Jan. 2017 · 9:33 a.m.
Short Reports Introduction
E. Giannoni, T. Karen, Resp. Lausanne, Zürich
10 Jan. 2017 · 9:38 a.m.
Association of Axonal Injury and Preeclampsia
Katrina Evers, Neonatology UKBB
10 Jan. 2017 · 9:39 a.m.
Q&A - Association of Axonal Injury and Preeclampsia
Katrina Evers, Neonatology UKBB
10 Jan. 2017 · 9:44 a.m.
Retinopathy of Prematurity
Roland Gerull, Bern
10 Jan. 2017 · 9:47 a.m.
Q&A - Retinopathy of Prematurity
Roland Gerull, Bern
10 Jan. 2017 · 9:54 a.m.
Parechovirus Infection: A Rare Cause of Neonatal Encephalitis (in French)
Dr Truant AS, Cheffe de clinique, Néonatologie, CHUV, Lausanne
10 Jan. 2017 · 9:59 a.m.
Q&A - Parechovirus Infection: A Rare Cause of Neonatal Encephalitis
Dr Truant AS, Cheffe de clinique, Néonatologie, CHUV, Lausanne
10 Jan. 2017 · 10:04 a.m.
Genetic Susceptibility to Neonatal Group B Streptococcal Disease
Alessandro Borghesi, Fellay lab, EPFL
10 Jan. 2017 · 10:17 a.m.
Q&A - Genetic Susceptibility to Neonatal Group B Streptococcal Disease
Alessandro Borghesi, Fellay lab, EPFL
10 Jan. 2017 · 10:25 a.m.
Psychomotor Development in Children Prenatally Exposed to Methadone
G. Grand-Guillaume-Perrenoud, Pediatrics, Children's University Hospital Geneva
10 Jan. 2017 · 10:27 a.m.
Q&A - Psychomotor Development in Children Prenatally Exposed to Methadone
G. Grand-Guillaume-Perrenoud, Pediatrics, Children's University Hospital Geneva
10 Jan. 2017 · 10:34 a.m.
Introduction to Christoph Berger's Presentation
C. Kind, R. Gerull, Resp. St.Gallen, Bern
10 Jan. 2017 · 10:37 a.m.
Vertical Infections: An Update
Christoph Berger, Zürich
10 Jan. 2017 · 10:40 a.m.
Q&A - Vertical Infections: An Update
Christoph Berger, Zürich
10 Jan. 2017 · 11:15 a.m.
Introduction to Eric Giannoni's Presentation
R. Pfister, S. Kämpfen, Resp. Geneva, Basel
10 Jan. 2017 · 11:44 a.m.
Sepsis, Antibiotics and Resistances: Where Are We?
Christoph Bührer, Berlin
10 Jan. 2017 · 2:21 p.m.
Use and Abuse of Antibiotics in Neonatology
Martin Stocker, Lucerne
10 Jan. 2017 · 2:50 p.m.
Panel Discussion : Controversies on Use of Antibiotics in Neonatology
Martin Stocker, Christoph Berger, Eric Giannoni, Christoph Bührer
10 Jan. 2017 · 3:10 p.m.
Introduction to Christoph Bührer's Presentation
Romaine Arlettaz Mieth , Neonatologist, Zürich, President of the Organizing Committee
10 Jan. 2017 · 3:47 p.m.
Evidence-Based Haemodynamic Management in Neonatal Sepsis
Christoph Bührer, Berlin
10 Jan. 2017 · 3:48 p.m.
Q&A - Evidence-Based Haemodynamic Management in Neonatal Sepsis
Christoph Bührer, Berlin
10 Jan. 2017 · 4:16 p.m.
SwissNeoDose Project
Marc Pfister, Ped Pharmacology, UKBB
10 Jan. 2017 · 4:20 p.m.