Player is loading...

Embed

Embed code

Transcriptions

Note: this content has been automatically generated.
00:00:00
thank you very much for this excellent
00:00:04
overview next update on the vertical
00:00:06
infections are there any questions from
00:00:09
the audience and maybe I start out with
00:00:15
a question what people are thinking I
00:00:19
really enjoyed your talk about CMB
00:00:21
because there's a lot of problems we
00:00:23
face them we don't know what to do
00:00:25
is there something you see on the on the
00:00:29
horizon when we think like 5 10 20 years
00:00:32
ahead we can be as successful with CMB
00:00:36
as we are with other infectious diseases
00:00:38
there are several things at the horizon
00:00:44
but I'm not so successful to be honest
00:00:47
because there are different difficult
00:00:50
things there is a vaccine i didn't talk
00:00:52
about two weeks explanation and the
00:00:54
vaccine progress is the problem is that
00:00:56
the the vaccination would primarily
00:00:58
address the prevention of primary
00:01:01
infection but we have probably more
00:01:04
reactivations or infection whether it
00:01:06
could help there too is an open question
00:01:09
if yes then magazine the vaccine would
00:01:12
become very relevant the other things
00:01:15
about the car the universal and touch it
00:01:18
screening and not yet convinced i think
00:01:22
we should just be a ver in the clinical
00:01:25
situation dented the neonatologists and
00:01:29
then test and have in mind if you fail
00:01:33
the hearing test also to think on
00:01:36
individual basis on what to do next
00:01:39
including cmp because if you did we do
00:01:45
universal zmb testing ninety percent of
00:01:49
the infected are asymptomatic and ten to
00:01:52
fifteen percent available symptoms and
00:01:54
the other ninety five percent have that
00:01:57
you have a family that have a sick child
00:01:59
that is asymptomatic or do you tell them
00:02:08
I told you I don't mind oh no no no and
00:02:15
I have a silly question
00:02:16
maybe because your outline that vertical
00:02:19
trend infections are bad dangerous they
00:02:22
trigger secretly or even kill fetuses
00:02:25
are children could we imagine on the
00:02:27
country that there are good vertically
00:02:31
transmitted infections that could maybe
00:02:33
not kill the features of the chart and
00:02:36
confer some kind of protection in in the
00:02:39
life later on by any rearrangement of
00:02:43
the immune system or by giving the child
00:02:46
some RNA bits or DNA because that could
00:02:50
protect protect against I don't know
00:02:52
what aging or anything just imagine that
00:02:55
something could be good
00:02:57
that's a very attractive idea but I
00:02:59
think you play the fire because there
00:03:02
are many things you have to and to take
00:03:06
into consideration from maternal
00:03:08
immunity fetal development persistence
00:03:12
and their education and very nice
00:03:15
hypotheses but i think very theoretical
00:03:18
yeah but I think it's really a way to
00:03:24
follow because it is separate infectious
00:03:27
why microbes that may be dangerous but
00:03:31
as a whole we know that the fetal
00:03:34
microbiome got a neonatal microbiome
00:03:37
comes from the mother and these are
00:03:39
billions of microbes that are beneficial
00:03:43
to their to the unit and are very
00:03:46
important and we also know much less
00:03:49
will not know little about microbiome
00:03:51
transfer but we know much less but we
00:03:55
know that there are many retro viruses
00:03:57
that are integrated into our genome and
00:04:00
that passed from mother to child and
00:04:03
they're probably most probably there are
00:04:05
many basic beneficials about them
00:04:08
because we still have them
00:04:10
so do you still like me are still there
00:04:12
so we might piece have surprises and
00:04:15
think in this way I agree and I think I
00:04:19
completely agree
00:04:20
but I think that's personal and
00:04:23
perception that nature is very well
00:04:25
balanced and we have to be very sure and
00:04:28
very cautious in if we intervene there
00:04:31
ok don't see any more questions on this
00:04:37
one okay stood virtually for the
00:04:41
overview
00:04:42
I've got a very very less sophisticated
00:04:45
but very practical question if you say
00:04:48
if we cannot measure the otoacoustic
00:04:51
emissions which happens quite often you
00:04:54
measure it usually a good day 23
00:04:56
depending on when the children go home
00:04:58
in a delivery department and it's quite
00:05:00
often can't measure them doesn't mean
00:05:03
that we have to search see me for all
00:05:05
these children or can you wait like very
00:05:09
often we repeat after a while or we send
00:05:11
them to the oral department here and get
00:05:15
back very nice result of perfect hearing
00:05:17
so do we scare the parents if we go and
00:05:21
feel like maybe C&B or do we do it
00:05:23
routinely once we don't see your
00:05:25
commission
00:05:26
this is a difficult than an open
00:05:29
question and i have not the definite
00:05:31
answer you have just to read these jama
00:05:33
pediatrics they recommend now just the
00:05:37
touch screen is exactly that in all of
00:05:40
them you do see MVPs your i would not
00:05:43
recommend that in general but if you
00:05:45
have in addition to the failed a.m.
00:05:49
screening you have other symptoms that
00:05:51
would maybe fit to CMV then i will go
00:05:55
over that and first of all i would try
00:05:58
to repeat it and if you have other
00:06:00
things then yes send it to the ENT if no
00:06:03
maybe not
00:06:04
I this is not black and white but this
00:06:07
is your clinical feeling that he's asked
00:06:09
there and today I think it's too early
00:06:12
but if there are suspicions if you're
00:06:15
concerned if the parents are concerned
00:06:16
yes to eat but we cannot do the pair are
00:06:19
in all of them because we need to make
00:06:22
an anesthesia on things like this and
00:06:24
then we would know
00:06:25
ok then I thank the speaker again and to
00:06:31
thank the audience for the interest
00:06:32
thing discussion and I like to close
00:06:34
the session I think we meet again here
00:06:36
at 2212 for the next session thank you

Share this talk: 


Conference program

Welcome Words
M. Roth-Kleiner, R. Arlettaz Mieth
10 Jan. 2017 · 9:33 a.m.
Short Reports Introduction
E. Giannoni, T. Karen, Resp. Lausanne, Zürich
10 Jan. 2017 · 9:38 a.m.
Association of Axonal Injury and Preeclampsia
Katrina Evers, Neonatology UKBB
10 Jan. 2017 · 9:39 a.m.
Q&A - Association of Axonal Injury and Preeclampsia
Katrina Evers, Neonatology UKBB
10 Jan. 2017 · 9:44 a.m.
Retinopathy of Prematurity
Roland Gerull, Bern
10 Jan. 2017 · 9:47 a.m.
Q&A - Retinopathy of Prematurity
Roland Gerull, Bern
10 Jan. 2017 · 9:54 a.m.
Parechovirus Infection: A Rare Cause of Neonatal Encephalitis (in French)
Dr Truant AS, Cheffe de clinique, Néonatologie, CHUV, Lausanne
10 Jan. 2017 · 9:59 a.m.
Q&A - Parechovirus Infection: A Rare Cause of Neonatal Encephalitis
Dr Truant AS, Cheffe de clinique, Néonatologie, CHUV, Lausanne
10 Jan. 2017 · 10:04 a.m.
Genetic Susceptibility to Neonatal Group B Streptococcal Disease
Alessandro Borghesi, Fellay lab, EPFL
10 Jan. 2017 · 10:17 a.m.
Q&A - Genetic Susceptibility to Neonatal Group B Streptococcal Disease
Alessandro Borghesi, Fellay lab, EPFL
10 Jan. 2017 · 10:25 a.m.
Psychomotor Development in Children Prenatally Exposed to Methadone
G. Grand-Guillaume-Perrenoud, Pediatrics, Children's University Hospital Geneva
10 Jan. 2017 · 10:27 a.m.
Q&A - Psychomotor Development in Children Prenatally Exposed to Methadone
G. Grand-Guillaume-Perrenoud, Pediatrics, Children's University Hospital Geneva
10 Jan. 2017 · 10:34 a.m.
Introduction to Christoph Berger's Presentation
C. Kind, R. Gerull, Resp. St.Gallen, Bern
10 Jan. 2017 · 10:37 a.m.
Vertical Infections: An Update
Christoph Berger, Zürich
10 Jan. 2017 · 10:40 a.m.
Q&A - Vertical Infections: An Update
Christoph Berger, Zürich
10 Jan. 2017 · 11:15 a.m.
Introduction to Eric Giannoni's Presentation
R. Pfister, S. Kämpfen, Resp. Geneva, Basel
10 Jan. 2017 · 11:44 a.m.
Sepsis, Antibiotics and Resistances: Where Are We?
Christoph Bührer, Berlin
10 Jan. 2017 · 2:21 p.m.
Use and Abuse of Antibiotics in Neonatology
Martin Stocker, Lucerne
10 Jan. 2017 · 2:50 p.m.
Panel Discussion : Controversies on Use of Antibiotics in Neonatology
Martin Stocker, Christoph Berger, Eric Giannoni, Christoph Bührer
10 Jan. 2017 · 3:10 p.m.
Introduction to Christoph Bührer's Presentation
Romaine Arlettaz Mieth , Neonatologist, Zürich, President of the Organizing Committee
10 Jan. 2017 · 3:47 p.m.
Evidence-Based Haemodynamic Management in Neonatal Sepsis
Christoph Bührer, Berlin
10 Jan. 2017 · 3:48 p.m.
Q&A - Evidence-Based Haemodynamic Management in Neonatal Sepsis
Christoph Bührer, Berlin
10 Jan. 2017 · 4:16 p.m.
SwissNeoDose Project
Marc Pfister, Ped Pharmacology, UKBB
10 Jan. 2017 · 4:20 p.m.
Awards (Case of the Year; Milupa; Best Poster Case Report; Best Oral Short Presentation) & Closing Comments
Matthias Roth-Kleiner, CHUV, President of the SSN
10 Jan. 2017 · 4:30 p.m.