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thank you very much for this excellent
overview next update on the vertical
infections are there any questions from
the audience and maybe I start out with
a question what people are thinking I
really enjoyed your talk about CMB
because there's a lot of problems we
face them we don't know what to do
is there something you see on the on the
horizon when we think like 5 10 20 years
ahead we can be as successful with CMB
as we are with other infectious diseases
there are several things at the horizon
but I'm not so successful to be honest
because there are different difficult
things there is a vaccine i didn't talk
about two weeks explanation and the
vaccine progress is the problem is that
the the vaccination would primarily
address the prevention of primary
infection but we have probably more
reactivations or infection whether it
could help there too is an open question
if yes then magazine the vaccine would
become very relevant the other things
about the car the universal and touch it
screening and not yet convinced i think
we should just be a ver in the clinical
situation dented the neonatologists and
then test and have in mind if you fail
the hearing test also to think on
individual basis on what to do next
including cmp because if you did we do
universal zmb testing ninety percent of
the infected are asymptomatic and ten to
fifteen percent available symptoms and
the other ninety five percent have that
you have a family that have a sick child
that is asymptomatic or do you tell them
I told you I don't mind oh no no no and
I have a silly question
maybe because your outline that vertical
trend infections are bad dangerous they
trigger secretly or even kill fetuses
are children could we imagine on the
country that there are good vertically
transmitted infections that could maybe
not kill the features of the chart and
confer some kind of protection in in the
life later on by any rearrangement of
the immune system or by giving the child
some RNA bits or DNA because that could
protect protect against I don't know
what aging or anything just imagine that
something could be good
that's a very attractive idea but I
think you play the fire because there
are many things you have to and to take
into consideration from maternal
immunity fetal development persistence
and their education and very nice
hypotheses but i think very theoretical
yeah but I think it's really a way to
follow because it is separate infectious
why microbes that may be dangerous but
as a whole we know that the fetal
microbiome got a neonatal microbiome
comes from the mother and these are
billions of microbes that are beneficial
to their to the unit and are very
important and we also know much less
will not know little about microbiome
transfer but we know much less but we
know that there are many retro viruses
that are integrated into our genome and
that passed from mother to child and
they're probably most probably there are
many basic beneficials about them
because we still have them
so do you still like me are still there
so we might piece have surprises and
think in this way I agree and I think I
completely agree
but I think that's personal and
perception that nature is very well
balanced and we have to be very sure and
very cautious in if we intervene there
ok don't see any more questions on this
one okay stood virtually for the
overview
I've got a very very less sophisticated
but very practical question if you say
if we cannot measure the otoacoustic
emissions which happens quite often you
measure it usually a good day 23
depending on when the children go home
in a delivery department and it's quite
often can't measure them doesn't mean
that we have to search see me for all
these children or can you wait like very
often we repeat after a while or we send
them to the oral department here and get
back very nice result of perfect hearing
so do we scare the parents if we go and
feel like maybe C&B or do we do it
routinely once we don't see your
commission
this is a difficult than an open
question and i have not the definite
answer you have just to read these jama
pediatrics they recommend now just the
touch screen is exactly that in all of
them you do see MVPs your i would not
recommend that in general but if you
have in addition to the failed a.m.
screening you have other symptoms that
would maybe fit to CMV then i will go
over that and first of all i would try
to repeat it and if you have other
things then yes send it to the ENT if no
maybe not
I this is not black and white but this
is your clinical feeling that he's asked
there and today I think it's too early
but if there are suspicions if you're
concerned if the parents are concerned
yes to eat but we cannot do the pair are
in all of them because we need to make
an anesthesia on things like this and
then we would know
ok then I thank the speaker again and to
thank the audience for the interest
thing discussion and I like to close
the session I think we meet again here
at 2212 for the next session thank you

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Conference program

Welcome Words
M. Roth-Kleiner, R. Arlettaz Mieth
10 jan. 2017 · 9:33 matin
Short Reports Introduction
E. Giannoni, T. Karen, Resp. Lausanne, Zürich
10 jan. 2017 · 9:38 matin
Association of Axonal Injury and Preeclampsia
Katrina Evers, Neonatology UKBB
10 jan. 2017 · 9:39 matin
Q&A - Association of Axonal Injury and Preeclampsia
Katrina Evers, Neonatology UKBB
10 jan. 2017 · 9:44 matin
Retinopathy of Prematurity
Roland Gerull, Bern
10 jan. 2017 · 9:47 matin
Q&A - Retinopathy of Prematurity
Roland Gerull, Bern
10 jan. 2017 · 9:54 matin
Parechovirus Infection: A Rare Cause of Neonatal Encephalitis (in French)
Dr Truant AS, Cheffe de clinique, Néonatologie, CHUV, Lausanne
10 jan. 2017 · 9:59 matin
Q&A - Parechovirus Infection: A Rare Cause of Neonatal Encephalitis
Dr Truant AS, Cheffe de clinique, Néonatologie, CHUV, Lausanne
10 jan. 2017 · 10:04 matin
Genetic Susceptibility to Neonatal Group B Streptococcal Disease
Alessandro Borghesi, Fellay lab, EPFL
10 jan. 2017 · 10:17 matin
Q&A - Genetic Susceptibility to Neonatal Group B Streptococcal Disease
Alessandro Borghesi, Fellay lab, EPFL
10 jan. 2017 · 10:25 matin
Psychomotor Development in Children Prenatally Exposed to Methadone
G. Grand-Guillaume-Perrenoud, Pediatrics, Children's University Hospital Geneva
10 jan. 2017 · 10:27 matin
Q&A - Psychomotor Development in Children Prenatally Exposed to Methadone
G. Grand-Guillaume-Perrenoud, Pediatrics, Children's University Hospital Geneva
10 jan. 2017 · 10:34 matin
Introduction to Christoph Berger's Presentation
C. Kind, R. Gerull, Resp. St.Gallen, Bern
10 jan. 2017 · 10:37 matin
Vertical Infections: An Update
Christoph Berger, Zürich
10 jan. 2017 · 10:40 matin
Q&A - Vertical Infections: An Update
Christoph Berger, Zürich
10 jan. 2017 · 11:15 matin
Introduction to Eric Giannoni's Presentation
R. Pfister, S. Kämpfen, Resp. Geneva, Basel
10 jan. 2017 · 11:44 matin
Sepsis, Antibiotics and Resistances: Where Are We?
Christoph Bührer, Berlin
10 jan. 2017 · 2:21 après-midi
Use and Abuse of Antibiotics in Neonatology
Martin Stocker, Lucerne
10 jan. 2017 · 2:50 après-midi
Panel Discussion : Controversies on Use of Antibiotics in Neonatology
Martin Stocker, Christoph Berger, Eric Giannoni, Christoph Bührer
10 jan. 2017 · 3:10 après-midi
Introduction to Christoph Bührer's Presentation
Romaine Arlettaz Mieth , Neonatologist, Zürich, President of the Organizing Committee
10 jan. 2017 · 3:47 après-midi
Evidence-Based Haemodynamic Management in Neonatal Sepsis
Christoph Bührer, Berlin
10 jan. 2017 · 3:48 après-midi
Q&A - Evidence-Based Haemodynamic Management in Neonatal Sepsis
Christoph Bührer, Berlin
10 jan. 2017 · 4:16 après-midi
SwissNeoDose Project
Marc Pfister, Ped Pharmacology, UKBB
10 jan. 2017 · 4:20 après-midi
Awards (Case of the Year; Milupa; Best Poster Case Report; Best Oral Short Presentation) & Closing Comments
Matthias Roth-Kleiner, CHUV, President of the SSN
10 jan. 2017 · 4:30 après-midi