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oh well thank you and good morning and i've i've greatly appreciate the owner of
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being here today and uh certainly following my dear friends from the us
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i'm trying to uh paint a picture of what all of this
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talk about nutrition means to the person on the street
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and you know just start this i wanted to make sure that we were all looking and
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thinking about the same information when we think about the state of global health uh today
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and certainly in my role as the c. e. o. of the american heart association
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um i spend every single day thinking about the state of cardiovascular health
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and the mare in the united states and around the world
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the leading cause of death seventeen and a half a million people
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every year lose their life to cardiovascular diseases in the world
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oh that is projected to be twenty three and a half almost
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twenty four million people your um in the coming years
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and what we recognise and know and and certainly
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important to this discussion uh today and tomorrow
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is the rising rates of risk for cardiovascular disease including type two diabetes and obesity
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hypertension and all of these rests on the rise and the question is how
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do our dietary patterns and dietary intake of that uh these diseases
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i i think that is important to know from of framing construct is what it is that
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um people here are about in our thinking about is the crises that will face the
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world and now and in the future and there was a recent world economic forum
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um survey of over seven hundred leaders of
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countries and large corporations in the world
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and you'll see that in the next ten years this
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question of scarcity and abundance of water and flew
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are definitely on the mind of people who are leading the dialogue in the world
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um you know the fact that forty percent of people um in the world have one month
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of their life where they have a scarcity of water you know that's really astonishing
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oh yeah there is such an abundance in other areas and when we think about food in
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particular and how the food supply is impacted by climate change you know scarcity of food
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i'm a over abundance of food in other areas you know certainly
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problems that are important to think of from a framing construct
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it was the state of global nutrition you know it is well known
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and documented that seventy percent of all diseases haven't nutrition background
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and this availability of high calorie neutering up for
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fruit is generating new forms of malnutrition
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so much today is wasted every single year um a yeah there are eight hundred and fifty
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million people around the world were mounted pressures it now um have our undernourished and
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we know that this lack of vital nutrients can lead
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to obesity type two diabetes and other severe illnesses
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they are um thing that's important to think about um and sell important our work at
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the american heart association is the work around health at woody or health inequity
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and you know when uh the united nations uh began focusing on non communicable
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diseases um after the high level meeting of uh uh twenty eleven
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uh when there was much more attention paid to the state of health in at woody around the world
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and there were really alarming uh rates in differences
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in life expectancy from country to country
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and this is something that all of us need to take accountability for and
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and have as part of our um agenda as we think about flu
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any us in particular you know we think a lot about obesity in
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children thirty one percent of united states children are overweight or obese
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out with the disproportionate percent of those who
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are in our under represented minority populations
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and what is striking in terms of advertising by um
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the fruit industry restaurants trade associations in the
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us there's about fourteen billion dollars a year spent
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on the ever ties in by those organisations
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and our own national institutes of health only spends twelve point four billion dollars to your own research
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for cardiovascular diseases including stroke and when we think about marketing take hits in the us
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um about one point eight billion dollars us that for your
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marketing aimed at children and teens and you can see
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um on this graph on the right with more than half of
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that focused on shrubbery substances cereals sweets and snacks et cetera
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and when we think about the what technology has done
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to enable new forms of ever ties thing
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and social media to promote products there some interesting studies that have been funded by the canadian
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i'm heartened stop foundation looking at ah might advertising of shrubbery
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products to uh use in canada that is certainly something worth uh taking a look at
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no i mentioned earlier the worldwide focus on health equities or inequity and in the
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united states um and certainly in my organisation and we're thinking a lot
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about the broader context in which people live their lives
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this is a scientific meeting thinking about a
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nutrition if we cannot take away is a adam said to start this that individual people
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have to make choices every single day about what they can and
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can't eat uh what they will and won't eat yet so many
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people are impacted by these social determinants of health that
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oh really robbed them of the opportunity to have the right
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to live a healthy like things like economic stability
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access to healthcare societal influences neighbourhood environment
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and level of education have all been shown to play a factor in terms of the
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overall health and well being of populations worldwide and certainly in the united states
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and when we think about those most at risk for disease you can look at
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these particular social determinants and no one understand that they play a tremendous role
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i'm here again uh the united states is the map of uh the new orleans louisiana area
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and when you wanna use the word that we're a new social
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justice you know i don't think that anyone thinks it okay
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yeah within a one mile radius in new orleans louisiana people who live in
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the french quarter area have a life expectancy of fifty five years
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we're right down the road um are people that have the um ability
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to have a life expectancy of seventy five seventy one years
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these um numbers can be replicated major
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cities in the united states and really make uh the
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point input and exclamation point on the social
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determinants of health that are absolutely impacting individual's ability
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to live a long and healthy life
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i'm only what consumers want and we at the ha and many organisations have
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done extensive market research on this not just for years but for decades
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and at the end of the day you can boil it down to one very simple statement
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people want to live a healthy lifestyle without any health conditions
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and they believe that consuming healthier foods can help them achieve their goals
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back and our two thousand and ten the american heart association published the first ever
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definition of ideal cardiovascular health with this uh uh data market research and mine
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and based upon available data at that time on these
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seven whole factors and health behaviours have banned
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um identified is those that help determine whether an
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individual will or won't have ideal cardiovascular health
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larger levels low cholesterol levels blood pressure maintaining a healthy weight
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maintaining a healthy diet being physically active in not smoking the striking use is that
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for an individual of your uh mail uh in you reach your the age of fifty
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five with all of these health factors and health behaviours in the quote ideal category
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you well i have a strong opportunity a strong
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likelihood of living well and your nineties
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and if you're a woman that you'll also have a strong a possibility of living and you're late eighty
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but as we stand here today in the united states you were then one
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percent of all americans have ideal cardiovascular health as we have defined it
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and if you were to strip away the healthy diets for which is a piece of that that number would go to seventeen percent
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so you can see that diet plays a very important
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role in the if a defining overall cardiovascular health
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but it's really the bundling of these hell factors and health behaviours together that really matter
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and so when you put together the social determinants in drivers of health the risk
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factors metabolic risk factors alternately these are leading to more heart attacks more strokes
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and increase in congestive heart failure in the us in around the world
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and we know i'm just to make the point even um more strongly that in
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the united states and this is based on the g. m. s. study
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uh focused on the nineteen ninety the twenty ten burden of diseases report that that hot
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um seven risk factors for an individual dying in the united states
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are the exact same risk factors that i just mentioned
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dietary to back up what pressure body mass index et cetera
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but an important thing to note is that dietary risks
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uh cause more deaths in the united states then cigarette smoking and that was really news when that
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came out because globally cigarette smoking causes the biggest um you know because cause of death
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so the question then becomes onto individual consumers and are they manage in there right
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and the good news is according to the nielsen global health and wellness report published in twenty
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fifteen and a supplement twenty sixteen have of global consumers are trying to lose weight
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two thirds of them are trying to cut down and fat and sugar
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people are trying to eat more fresh and natural for you
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you know more than three quarters of people are trying to change their diet and trying
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to you last process flew these are all of the things that are good news
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and in the united states the percent of americans who believe it's important to
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live a healthy lifestyle has increased from sixty to seventy five percent
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that's all really good news and the question is are people able to do it
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um and we're looking as well at a significant growth in healthy food sales except in europe
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um that uh is allowing a individuals to have more
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of a chance to uh live healthy life
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but um we also know that when you look at particular countries in here
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and since we're in switzerland we can look at switzerland this is um
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a steady proportionally american journal of clinical nutrition this looks at
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fifteen year trends in the prevalence of seriously eating uh
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i'd uh eating healthy in switzerland and you can see 'em
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that as things like taste in price daily habits time
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a limited options become less of a barrier people are eating healthier
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foods in this certainly should make the case for why
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it's important for um organisations for governments and for the fruit industry to
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work together to make these are areas more accessible for everyone
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now when we are thinking about consumers an individual people
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uh we've done a lot of studying about what people in various age ranges find important
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and the headline is that all generations believe that healthy products are important
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but what they're looking for unhealthy products varies by the ages unsolvable any holes
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um are thinking a lot about products that are um well
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when sugar all natural um have appropriate levels of protein
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low sodium and free from preserve it is the gen exercise care a lot about things that are on sale
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i'm also care about a server hormone free and
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trans fat free and baby boomers of course
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are concerned about things that are artificial and if you go younger then lenny alls
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um there is a real trend although we have not yet documented it and we uh didn't have it in this study but
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we're seeing at a very much in our work of people
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that are younger the millennium is very much focused on
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wholesome natural um socially responsible produced from
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and this is these are very important friends when we're trying to create this intersection of what people want
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what is available to people and how much people are willing to pay
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for it in order to live um i hope he likes style
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we also know that in different populations there are different priorities
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oh this is the us study um yeah that looks at individuals
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in income gender and ethnicity and the good news is
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um you know most people especially those in high incomes care a
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lot about living a healthy lifestyle men and women care
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pretty much equally um and across the ethnicity is we were
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surprised to find that more african americans and hispanics
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hear about living not like healthy lifestyle than do whites in the us
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the question again comes to access and social determinants of health and can i
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but despite he's um trends towards hell of what we're
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recognising is unhealthy food sales continue to rise
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um even though we know that global consumers are cutting down
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on sugar we also recognise that the consumption of
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uh energy dense nutrient for fruit is five times higher in developing countries
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and at twenty five percent increase in packaged foods worldwide
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i'm certainly is going to lead to less um than positive health and well being
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and so these unhealthy food trends um are very important for us to to consider and
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again speaking about consumers and to build on something that marion talked about earlier today
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is the amount of confusion of consumers is
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you just cannot be understated every time
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an article and abstract is presented at the meeting you know a new
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dietary guidance comes out in by any association in any country
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you're the news media um is is making it the story of the day
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and the average person on the street whether in the u. s. or in any
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you know place where people have access to the news media are with their completely confuse
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um you know do wire don't i drink you know drinks with coconut oil should i or shouldn't i have sure what
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you know what should i or shouldn't id when who was the trusted resourceful people
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to help them that through all of the confusing science and so when you look at it
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um we are studies have shown that fifty one percent of us consumers or confuse
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about what they're supposed to do to live a healthy lifestyle and
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places that people are looking to for information from trusted sources
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in the us include doctors nutrition scientists not for profit organisations like the ha
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um and then you'll see 'em down more members of the news
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media like blogger is government's food industry manufacturers et cetera
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and so we um again have this disconnect of individuals knowing in under same they're hearing things in the
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news media not sure how the actual eyes that into their own life looking for clear guidance
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um and you know with all respect our wonderful us a dietary
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guidelines they it's very difficult for the average person with
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an average education level and average income level to know and understand what that means for them as a person
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and for all the work that we do with the ha to try
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to translate that there is still this mass confusion among people
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um and speaking of the american heart association and you know we're
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doing a lot to try to clear this confusion out
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um you know we're certainly advocating for public policies that promote better health providing clear guidance
00:16:14
um based on ha science in trying to empower consumers through innovative health campaigns
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like our plus colour campaign that focuses on access to fruits and vegetables
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um it and we recognise that how was he plays
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a critically important role and as as stated earlier
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this focus on access a or reducing access disagree beverages is very critical
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there have been nine um public policy campaigns in united
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states in recent months in as mary mentioned earlier
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eight of those have resulted in taxation and should re beverages in one of them in new mexico
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um did not pass and the reason it didn't pass is
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that the advocates including um the ha did not do
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a good job with the spanish speaking hispanics helping to
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translate the benefit to individuals of consuming less sugar
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um but this idea that reducing um access to should re beverages
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will reduce consumption and improve health is something we're making
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a big baton at the ha we focused an enormous amount
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of resources to try to move this public policy agenda
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as we have been in terms of reducing sodium content and fruits and improving school nutrition
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when you talk to parents in the us are they are gravely
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concerned about what's being fed to their kids it's cool
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the amount of a shiver in fact the access to healthy
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foods the affordability of fruit since uh school fruits
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and it's very unfortunate that much progress that was made uh in the prior eight years in the
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united states um with government policies to assure more access to healthy foods in the united states
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um many of that including the school nutrition policies are being zero down
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and so we have a lot of work to do to make sure that that
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continues an interest of opportunities for the food and beverage industry there are many
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um and these are things that are an important part of our portfolio to help encourage
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um members of industry to take seriously the opportunity
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and responsibility to meet the needs of consumers
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you know what it is that people want they say they want this and so
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they can't have it if the food industries in providing things in so
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first roll inspiring consumers to eat healthy foods you making it easy
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for consumers to make informed choices isn't important responsibility of the food industry
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ensuring access to healthy foods inspiring healthy purchases through pricing incentives
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complying with healthy labelling requirements and offering portion control and then then options all very
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important things are what we would call on the food industry to do
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and specifically is it results in france here is it relates to transparency in nutrition labels
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seventy five percent of the united states consumer say that the food
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label is that how influence for their for who purchases
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and what do they want more of all of the things on the left
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in the green vitamins heart healthy ingredients fibre vitamin d. anti accidents calcium
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um it's cetera and what do they might last of all of the
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things that are or are perceived to be harmful to health
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including on this list rubber and artificial sweeteners um in the
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u. s. people are looking for less of that
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um we also hope that um even though
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there are varying levels of um enforcement
00:19:36
of menu labelling requirements in the us in in other countries around the world
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uh there is no question that when menu label lang is better um yen
00:19:45
restaurants and places where food is served cafeterias hospitals colleges six cetera
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that there is an absolute awareness of the importance of eating healthier
00:19:55
this thing is um a steady propulsion lemur american journal of public health and march twenty fifteen
00:20:00
based upon mandatory menu label in an investment thinking county washington and
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you can see that what the data powell semen into effect
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um that there has there was a spike both in terms of
00:20:12
awareness in actual consumption of health your fruit and so
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this idea of nutrition menu label in is very
00:20:19
important to consumers and something that we encourage
00:20:23
um that there be more support for in less of fighting against when it comes to
00:20:28
um uh industry in terms of re formulating this food supply
00:20:33
as well um you know we know that consumers
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look for many a look in many places i and
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for many pieces of health uh in well misinformation
00:20:43
we need a c. over here the of food marketing
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institute looked at the us grocery shopper trends
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and you'll see the things that us grocery shoppers are looking for from the
00:20:53
consumer point of view whole grains low sodium low server high fibre
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no artificial ingredients no trance that no preservatives low calorie interesting
00:21:01
low calorie about halfway down on the list and when
00:21:06
we look globally forty five percent of global responded say
00:21:09
that snacks with all natural ingredients are very important
00:21:13
um and people are willing to pay more for things that are better for them those that can afford
00:21:19
to pay more so again just more case for the importance of re formulating the food supply
00:21:25
and you know we at the age i applaud nestle for its work and its
00:21:29
commitment publicly to re formulate a third of their global portfolio every year
00:21:34
this is really industry leading um and this is why we have been very
00:21:39
proud at the ha to help convene other members of the fruit industry
00:21:43
um to think about ways to uh impact the food supply especially when
00:21:48
it comes to focusing on promoting health equity or reducing health inequity
00:21:55
um i mentioned earlier uh the importance of the
00:21:59
fast food in fast casual market fifteen
00:22:02
million people in the united states eat at a fast food restaurant every day
00:22:07
i mean that is us that statistic but it's the truth statistics
00:22:11
so how do we help make sure those who are healthier
00:22:14
i'm sixteen and seventeen billion dollars a year the projected value
00:22:18
of the global fast would market by twenty nineteen
00:22:21
and almost fifty percent of two dollars in the united states
00:22:25
are spent away from home so again this idea that
00:22:29
we have to look not just at things that people buy the stock their p. entries at home but
00:22:34
consider all of the places that people consume fruit as important places
00:22:39
for um organisations governments and industry to help make sure that there's equity in the food
00:22:45
distribution acts here in the united states um you can think
00:22:50
about this idea of this concept of fruit deserts
00:22:53
and back to the large disparities in health that
00:22:57
are caused by income and education and
00:23:00
um and access to healthcare and access to healthy food
00:23:04
these are real issues that our society is facing
00:23:08
um if you look at this uh um map of the united states
00:23:13
uh you will see that there are many many people
00:23:17
who do not have a supermarket within one mile
00:23:20
of their home and have no car so how are people going to have access to fresh through
00:23:26
um i grew up in a community just outside of detroit michigan
00:23:30
and you know until last year for ten years there was not
00:23:34
a supermarket or grocery store in the city of detroit michigan
00:23:39
into whole foods open the supermarket right near the new sports complex
00:23:43
and so you know how are people going to eat healthy if we don't address the
00:23:48
social determinants we on the ground at the ha are doing a lot of work
00:23:52
there are voices for healthy to its initiative to try to make the access to healthy foods available work
00:23:57
finding places like gas stations in others that are selling bananas in fruit and lettuce and
00:24:03
and things that you know pop up stands gardens in schools all of the kinds of things that
00:24:08
we would one expect to make a health healthful food more available to
00:24:12
folks um but these are real problems that need a real answers
00:24:19
we also would call on um the food industry to make sure
00:24:22
that there are proper nutrition offerings across the life style
00:24:27
oh life cycle of individuals from pregnancy all the way to a jane um you know we think
00:24:32
a lot about young people we think about adults but you know people with disease and people
00:24:37
better a gene um you know very important markets for the work that we um think about
00:24:43
and we also call on members of the food industry to partner with organisations
00:24:47
like the h. a. m. like local governments in transforming health in communities
00:24:51
people live in communities they go to school in communities they um
00:24:56
you get their groceries in communities in until we transform
00:25:00
the way that communities are able to own the health of the people on their areas
00:25:04
um i think we'll continue to have these huge uh statistics about
00:25:08
disease and whisper disease as well as the inequities that
00:25:12
um don't do not allow people to have a chance of living a healthy life
00:25:17
um we heard earlier about this still interventions on unhealthy foods this
00:25:21
is a difficult one for the food industry uh that have
00:25:25
our shareholders to support but we know that fiscal
00:25:29
interventions make a difference and i'm talking
00:25:31
specifically about taxation policy in price subsidies they make a difference in terms of
00:25:37
people consuming healthful foods verses on healthful foods if you wanna look at
00:25:42
the huge reduction in cigarette use tobacco use in the world
00:25:46
uh in the past twenty years you can look no further than taxation policies that have driven the rates of
00:25:52
of uses that harmful um a product down if you wanna look at a
00:25:58
direct correlation between subsidies for healthful food and places where i um she
00:26:04
a fruit that is high in calories and high and all of the wrong ingredients cost a less
00:26:09
money you will directly see these health disparities in
00:26:12
increase levels um of course health and populations
00:26:17
and we also call on the food industry to collaborate with our organisation in the public health community
00:26:22
i mentioned earlier that we were very proud to our co host with um nestle
00:26:27
uh i've fruit uh some that were we called an industry to
00:26:31
agree to more standardised menu label into very robust goals
00:26:35
for um for we formulation of the food supply we know
00:26:39
that um it's very important that uh we and the
00:26:42
public health community and fruit industry together think about these died
00:26:47
in nutrition guidelines and make sure that we're aligned
00:26:49
and also making sure that marketing and products that are being supported him promoted
00:26:55
by the food industry are influencing people to make healthier choices um when they are shopping
00:27:01
and we also encourage industry to collaborate with the ha and the
00:27:05
public health community you know there's a great example in new
00:27:08
york uh when the uh former mayor and former health commissioner of
00:27:13
very much focused on salt reduction and we were proud
00:27:16
participant in the national uh salt reduction initiative that
00:27:19
call for twenty five percent reduction in fruit
00:27:22
so the main food products over five year time period many organisations participated in that it
00:27:28
was a wonderful way for industry to come together with public health and with governments
00:27:33
to make commitments that actually could be demonstrated to make an impact and help for people
00:27:39
and of course we work on industry to partner on global
00:27:42
solutions um and many organisations were thinking about global solutions
00:27:51
i was just spend a moment uh talking about a few things that um are on the
00:27:55
horizon impacting food nutrition and these things are very much on the mind of real people
00:28:00
um you know who eat fruit every single day or who don't have access to fruit
00:28:04
oh that they wish they did um and a lot of these have to do with disruptions in technology
00:28:10
um you know it is a hard to imagine a if you we were to put the clock back
00:28:15
ten years ago you know all of us who we live our entire life on our mobile phone
00:28:20
um you know the the thought that the um technology solutions available on your mobile phone if you
00:28:26
bottom ten years ago because nine thousand dollars per phone right your video conferencing audio conferencing
00:28:32
all of the various things so if if we think about today and think about
00:28:37
next year or the year after or the year after what will technology enable
00:28:41
as it relates to access to flew as it relates to new fruit in product development
00:28:47
and as it relates to how individuals will manage um their diet
00:28:52
and so this idea of on line and automated food delivery maybe even a year or two years ago
00:28:58
um we didn't see that the way we see it now you know many of the purchases
00:29:02
strategically that amazon for an exam for example is
00:29:05
making um will allow them to create
00:29:09
um accessed of healthful food in ways that people couldn't even imagine
00:29:14
um i know where i live in dallas texas i'm i'm very fortunate to have an amazon
00:29:19
filament centre fourteen uh about thirty to forty minutes from my house so i can press
00:29:25
order now and i haven't even moved from my home office
00:29:30
you know to my front door in what i've ordered now has appeared on my front doorstep
00:29:34
um your readers in it at amazon and other technology companies are
00:29:38
absolutely trying to figure out how to solve the problems
00:29:42
that people have and this includes access to food in access to helpful too
00:29:47
so there are a number of the strategic acquisitions taking place and when you think about drone
00:29:52
delivery i mean we can laugh and say oh well drawn delivery ever really happened
00:29:57
what people probably left ten years ago and said would you ever get nine thousand dollars worth of
00:30:01
you know technology available to you on something you could fit in your pocket or your purse
00:30:06
we believe this is going to happen and i can absolutely change the way food is made available to people
00:30:12
um you know personalise died initiation based on genome there's a lot of work happening here many foot companies
00:30:18
are investing in subsidiary businesses that are trying to figure this out
00:30:22
um and as we try to layer and not just a
00:30:26
focus on the genome but on other um areas and
00:30:30
aspects of people's uh um body composition this idea of
00:30:34
course allies nutrition will become a reality we believe
00:30:38
and the idea of three d. printed food um you know i left
00:30:41
when i first heard about three d. printing and we actually had
00:30:45
a an individual common speak to our board who was very much on
00:30:49
the forefront of three d. paint printing about two years ago
00:30:52
any talked about three d. printing of a bridge and how this three d. printing of
00:30:56
a bridge would really allow people to drive a car over bridge and that
00:31:00
you know if you think about infrastructure today in creating roads
00:31:04
and bridges and those kind of things the money
00:31:07
you know the the availability of label um and the time it takes to that to
00:31:12
happen that not too far in the distant future will people be able to
00:31:15
create um transportation alternatives with three d. printing and people three d. printing foo now
00:31:22
um you know this in these little capsules that allow people to what helpful ingredients e. and
00:31:27
um and they can absolutely three d. three food products you know will this
00:31:32
becomes something that everyone does a year two years three years five years
00:31:36
now i don't have a a crystal ball to know but these are things
00:31:40
that many of these technology companies and food companies are working on
00:31:44
um when we think about food and beverages medicine and you know and in one way this has been happening for
00:31:50
a long time if you look at type one diabetic so
00:31:53
how they manage their urge food consumption um meticulous
00:31:57
because they had to over so many euros that is an example of fruit is madison
00:32:03
but when we think about prevention and opportunities for individual to prevent disease by looking
00:32:09
at healthful ingredients in fruit and thinking about the right foods that could
00:32:13
be prescribed by health care providers for individuals to manage the risk for disease
00:32:18
this is a big trend um that we believe will be happening
00:32:22
and also um we're paying very close attention on as our people to house startups could be
00:32:28
taking a bite out of the food industry you know here's a really interesting example
00:32:33
um this organisation or company called ample so ample his company has created
00:32:38
this comp could pick what they claim complete nutrition in a bottle
00:32:42
twenty six percent protein twenty five percent carbohydrate forty nine percent of the fat
00:32:47
and they um through crowds sourcing created the revenue to be
00:32:53
able to launch their product into the marketplace the biggest
00:32:56
funded um yen a very short period of time three nine
00:32:59
sixty seven thousand hours of funding from individual people
00:33:03
you know when on and gave ten dollars a hundred hours a thousand dollars to get this food startup going
00:33:08
um we think of other fruits startups like door dash appealing and
00:33:12
our evaluation um and sense twenty fifteen fruit tech start ups
00:33:17
um have race five point seven billion dollars from investors and so there's big that's happening
00:33:23
that these um companies that are able to go after a problem very quickly will make a big difference
00:33:30
well what we like to think about um is that all
00:33:34
of this whether it's that the support that is needed
00:33:38
um by new start ups to have the evidence that their product actually makes a difference
00:33:44
or whether it is all that we heard of this morning um
00:33:47
about dietary guidance over time the confusion between sugar for at
00:33:52
um you know that what we really haven't society today um is
00:33:57
any information problem clear and simple science has an information problem
00:34:02
oh healthcare provider seventeen information problem in consumers have an information problem
00:34:08
and we believe that information in fixing the information problem is at the
00:34:12
core of what will allow us to progress in a way
00:34:16
um that individuals have more clarity and companies have more clarity in science has more clarity
00:34:22
with um all of the new computing capabilities available we think that there's
00:34:26
really an important moment i had were information um if organised properly
00:34:32
can really make a difference and ultimately and finally understanding
00:34:36
um the complexities around nutrition musician sign it
00:34:40
and this is why at the ha um we've focused very much um on trying to fix this
00:34:45
problem in really looking to a convergence of partners at this idea of what is it
00:34:51
that causes an individual to transition from well this to disease
00:34:55
um you know in coronary heart disease for example so much 'cause then
00:35:00
study and what happens to a person after they have disease
00:35:04
and as matter fact after a person has disease in corner heart disease that most of the research has been conducted on
00:35:10
the cholesterol receptor which is all been very valuable research but
00:35:14
not much on this so you know what what happens
00:35:17
when a person is well and suddenly they are they start building plaque and
00:35:21
there are coronary arteries and so we've created um a convergence of partners
00:35:25
and really um fantastic team of scientists led by doctor cow mccrae cheaper
00:35:31
cardiology at the brigham and women's hospital in boston we're we're committed
00:35:35
to try to create a new biological pathway a more rigorous understanding of
00:35:39
the role of nutrition and other environmental variables in preventing coronary disease
00:35:44
lessons about how to create new human phenotype steers the information problem we're trying to fix
00:35:50
a new approach to diagnostics um and potential new consumer facing solutions
00:35:55
that can prevent um or treat heart disease more effectively
00:36:02
and as i said before we think come from uh information content in support deficit and this is what we're trying
00:36:07
to fix re one brave idea looking at genetics juno makes
00:36:11
clinical trials in redesign of karen people's life style
00:36:15
um because we recognise that few with any conditioning variables are ever
00:36:19
measured ultimately leading individuals to be confused about their health
00:36:24
and so the last thing i would say is really a call to action all of us and
00:36:28
i think this is a remarkable gathering of leaders um from nestle of course and it's board
00:36:34
i'm from the scientific community throughout the world from the public health community
00:36:40
um and from organisations like the american heart association we're all gonna have to work together
00:36:45
to fix these very complex problems that ultimately are rooted in access
00:36:51
and clarity of information and understanding so that individuals
00:36:56
i have a chance to live their best life possible and we certainly look forward to
00:36:59
working with all of you to help solve this puzzle thank you very much
00:37:10
i questions from m. c.
00:37:14
just uh oh oh oh oh
00:37:20
oh sure why
00:37:30
oh or interest
00:37:35
yeah i dropped it yeah yeah it's focus should
00:37:48
oh you should go well i agree if it if she oh wow why don't you
00:38:01
useful for sure sure yeah true true h. e.
00:38:09
i i want to say thank you are i mean really important point and
00:38:16
um you know i had to draw the line somewhere data we
00:38:18
have a lot of data and the pleasure of who i i would say the biggest thing that i would say is the problem
00:38:24
um uh are two things number one it really is this
00:38:29
um disparity that exists in the us and around the world on access
00:38:34
um to healthful foods that um are caused by a number of reasons
00:38:40
and that needs to be fixed because at the end of the day people need to make individual choices
00:38:45
um about what they choose to do but if you have no ability even if you want to be helpful even if you want to
00:38:52
um you know enjoy longer life without disease in risk which we know people want to if you have no way
00:38:58
um to make better your reality that is the single biggest
00:39:01
problem the information problem that i referenced is significant
00:39:06
we you know individuals have an information problem science has an information
00:39:10
problem you know uh you know you can look at any
00:39:13
um diet we've talked about dietary guidelines and
00:39:17
dietary recommendations ingredients versus dietary patterns
00:39:21
all of that is wonderful for gathering like this to talk about but when you know go plop yourself the and you
00:39:27
know the middle of any city in any country in the world and start talking to people about dietary patterns and
00:39:33
you know died during we can set you know way over their head what people need to know and understand is what is the best
00:39:39
guy for me to eat for example if i want to reduce
00:39:42
my risk of cardiovascular disease and white information is a problem
00:39:46
you know is it the mediterranean diet yes or no big question you're so who's gonna study
00:39:52
that and how are you gonna make sure that the information gathered is not just self
00:39:57
reported information you know way every time i do self reporting information and i try to
00:40:01
do it really well i've even you know a thousand calories and might be in
00:40:06
he is seventy you know so it's you know people are there's just this tendency of people
00:40:11
to exaggerate to the positive or negative it's human nature so with all this technology
00:40:16
how can we solve the information problem so that's why i focused on
00:40:20
those two but i completely agree with you the pleasure of meeting
00:40:23
the the social nature of eating with people that you care about those are also very important factors
00:40:30
with the question from times before we go to work yeah sure
00:40:34
oh oh oh oh
00:40:44
i first oh yes oh
00:40:54
that's all i i should
00:41:03
but for all action
00:41:10
yeah i'll draw a or a school well i oh well yes
00:41:24
oh of course thank you and you know i i probably didn't emphasise it enough but i certainly earlier
00:41:30
um did reference the that both i um obesity
00:41:34
and diabetes are risk factors for coronary disease
00:41:37
and i in the terms of this definition of ideal cardiovascular health and what we measure it the ha
00:41:43
you know um what sugar levels um body mass index healthy diet physical
00:41:48
activity are all part of the measurements of ideal cardiovascular health
00:41:52
and in addition those seven health factors in health behaviours
00:41:56
are all can also project your risk for cancer
00:41:59
so with all related um and certainly um we uh do you think a
00:42:04
lot in work a lot uh in the areas of obesity and diabetes
00:42:10
oh yes i
00:42:15
oh oh oh oh
00:42:22
so making indicate oh yeah oh
00:42:29
i i i shall
00:42:35
i i i i i i can i can were lined i completely agree with that

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Conference program

Nutrition advocacy in action: the politics of sugar vs. fat
Marion Nestle, New York University, USA
28 Sept. 2017 · 9:27 a.m.
Fat and carbohydrate recommendations - Have they changed?
Barbara Schneeman, University of California, Davis, USA
28 Sept. 2017 · 10:14 a.m.
Promoting equitable health and wellbeing around the globe
Nancy Brown, American Heart Association, Dallas, USA
28 Sept. 2017 · 11:30 a.m.
Gut hormones and nutrition
Sir Stephen Bloom, Imperial College London, England
28 Sept. 2017 · 1:38 p.m.
Nutrition, metabolic health, cancer and NCDs
Elio Riboli, Imperial College London, England
28 Sept. 2017 · 2:27 p.m.
Infant and child nutrition and cognitive development
Wendy Oddy, Menzies Institute for Medical Research, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia
28 Sept. 2017 · 3:51 p.m.
Microbes, metabolism and autoimmunity
Ramnik Xavier, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, USA
29 Sept. 2017 · 9:06 a.m.
Lipid metabolism in high fructose fed humans
Luc Tappy, University of Lausanne, Switzerland
29 Sept. 2017 · 10:03 a.m.
Food, health and disease: The evidence and reporting the evidence
Dennis Bier, Children's Nutrition Research Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, USA
29 Sept. 2017 · 11:11 a.m.
Deeper down the rabbit hole of data, analysis, and inference errors and suggestions for digging back out
David Allison, Indiana University School of Public Health, Bloomington, USA
29 Sept. 2017 · 1 p.m.
Neural circuits of food intake - is it all about calories?
Harvey Grill, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA
29 Sept. 2017 · 1:55 p.m.

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