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00:00:00
okay that's a big uh that the big ask uh i'm gonna focus on the second question
00:00:06
which was around the context for humanitarian work and i agreed with the organisers
00:00:12
that i would mostly focused on the political context now given that i'm already eating injure coffee break
00:00:18
um i'm gonna focus on two big political
00:00:22
uh factors and try to draw link
00:00:25
uh between those and work um that you do
00:00:29
and they both related things in twenty sixteen
00:00:33
which if you're anything like me you were very glad to see that back
00:00:36
and of twenty sixty um it was a terrible you're in many respects
00:00:43
and it ended with uh the siege of a laptop which for
00:00:47
me was one of the darkest periods uh in humanitarian work
00:00:53
and it also reflected the complete break down in cooperation among the great powers
00:00:59
with respect to conflict now why is that important um for you
00:01:05
well there's a few things about violent conflict which by the way conflict rice eighty per
00:01:10
cent of humanitarian me but i think it become clear over the last year
00:01:16
one that conflict but itself is spiking a internal conflict secondly
00:01:23
and i think this is important for your work
00:01:26
doom ration of conflict is longer today than it was two decades ago
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and then i wanna pick up a point that was made earlier conflict
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is increasingly urban we seem to recognise the nation of violent
00:01:39
and the blurring together of criminal violence and formal armed conflict
00:01:45
and lastly conflicts have increased in lethality forces billions
00:01:50
it's been an increase in civilian deaths and is you know
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better than high it's increased in lethality for humanitarian workers
00:01:58
now if we think about those facts about conflict and we also consider the world bank's recent
00:02:05
uh findings the two billion of the world's people now live in countries
00:02:10
where developmental comes in particularly the sustainable development calls or negatively
00:02:16
affected by state fragility or conflict or violence we have at least
00:02:21
on the demand side for humanitarian action a very troubling landscape
00:02:28
by the year twenty thirty to share of the global for living in french on conflict
00:02:34
affected here as well which is staggering forty six percent up from seventy percent today
00:02:41
we've seen over the past years while she when made famine in many of the
00:02:46
countries that have been discussed this morning sell c. dan yan and somalia nigerian
00:02:53
so given these projections we need to think and reflect
00:02:58
a great deal on the the negative political context for resolving ah
00:03:04
those complex my second point and i'm trying to quickly can
00:03:08
it's a report that came out from freedom house it's twenty sixteen report
00:03:13
but the number of countries around the world it's are suffering
00:03:16
met declines in political right and separate and civil liberties
00:03:21
the number of countries worse are experiencing those declines now double the number that register
00:03:27
improvements so what am i think that democracy and how democracy is in decline
00:03:34
there's a new term that's a revision in my field that was unthinkable a
00:03:38
decade ago and that is democratic d. consolidation countries d. the market pricing
00:03:45
and ladies and gentlemen what's interesting about freedom house's report if that the in our fifth indicate that this decline in
00:03:51
the quality of democracies is no longer concentrated among the talker
00:03:56
seething dictatorships it's also impacting countries traditionally for each
00:04:03
no democratic consolidation d. consolidation happens in two ways one
00:04:08
if that phyllis is become disposed alternative political systems
00:04:13
and she institutional features of democracies like party systems become dysfunctional
00:04:19
that it also happens when there's a new rochelle of key norms and rules in democratic systems
00:04:27
and western liberal democracies have certainly lay to rest
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any pretends to be leading by example in
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light of the speed with which political leaders have latched onto nationalist and anti immigration matter
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we've seen again in twenty sixteen collusion with the populace
00:04:46
temptation to plan nationalist and anti immigration rhetoric
00:04:51
and we've seen that blaming of international institutions for the problems the world faces
00:04:58
so we now have clinical opinion in many much
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more liberal democracies become dakota minds between
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those who favour the continuation of global rising
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trends open borders dense networks of corporation
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and those who want to return to more closed
00:05:17
and homogeneous and self sufficient national community
00:05:21
now get why does this matter for you the first yeah i think it flies in the face of demographic
00:05:27
that mentioning this morning of remittances the diversity insider societies which
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flies in the face of these two will call developments
00:05:36
and secondly it flies in the face of technologies that facilitate people to people ties
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including the fantastic developments in digital technology that
00:05:47
allow us to fee painted distant
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uh i'm thinking of the virtual reality film that was shown at
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the world economic forum about the young woman um in syria
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so let me sum up i think the demand side for your work is increasing
00:06:04
but we have a theory worrying fed development on the supply side when
00:06:08
i think of those countries that have signed the grand market
00:06:13
there's retreating internationalism and defeat ism about promoting ambitious agendas
00:06:19
i saw this very clearly at the end of my time working for the united nations
00:06:24
we see declining budgets to to focus on domestic priorities but more warring we we see
00:06:30
a loss of well i disenchantment with past efforts to bring stability and protection
00:06:37
there's a reigning belief that the cost of action are simply too high
00:06:42
but there's almost no discussion of the cost of inaction what happens when we fail to our
00:06:50
no one silver lining 'cause i can't and on a on a dark no
00:06:54
is that what i see in my field in the field of protection
00:06:58
if that if disenchantment is retreating internationalism has actually fostered
00:07:04
a lot of support for notions of self protection
00:07:07
how do international actors hot outside actors to help civilians protect
00:07:12
themselves rather than try to protect them from the outside
00:07:17
how they more about how they engage in self protection what are
00:07:20
own self protection strategies and how can they be enhanced
00:07:25
by the work of outside parts i and i think that um that trend
00:07:30
if we're in line with the move towards the provision of cash

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Conference program

Opening
Nigel Timmins, Humanitarian Director, Oxfam International and Chair of CaLP Board
28 June 2017 · 9:09 a.m.
Formal Welcome
Manuel Bessler, Assistant Director General and Head of Humanitarian Aid Department, SDC
28 June 2017 · 9:48 a.m.
Looking to the future : Panel introduction
Christina Bennett, Head of the Humanitarian Policy Group, ODI
28 June 2017 · 9:56 a.m.
Looking to the future: Social Cash Transfer in Response to Ebola in Liberia
Gabriel Fernandez, National Social Protection Coordinator, Liberian Government
28 June 2017 · 9:56 a.m.
Looking to the future : MasterCard perspective
Ian Taylor, Vice President, Business Development, Government & Public Sector, MasterCard
28 June 2017 · 10:12 a.m.
Looking to the future : International Relations perspective
Jennifer Welsh, Professor and Chair in International Relations, European University Institute and Senior Research Fellow, Somerville College, University of Oxford
28 June 2017 · 10:30 a.m.
Q&A - Looking to the future
Panel
28 June 2017 · 10:37 a.m.
Operational Modalities : Panel introduction
Ben Parker, Senior Editor, IRIN
28 June 2017 · 11:08 a.m.
Operational Modalities : Sri Lanka experience
Sithamparapillai Amalanathan, Secretary, Ministry of Disaster Management, Sri Lanka
28 June 2017 · 11:10 a.m.
Operational Modalities : Turkish experience
Orhan Hac?mehmet and Jonathan Campbell, Resp: Coordinator Of Kizilaykart Cash Based Assistance Programmes, Turkish Red Crescent - Deputy Country Director, WFP, Turkey
28 June 2017 · 11:21 a.m.
Operational Modalities : Zimbabwe experience
Abel. S. Whande, Team Leader, Cash Transfer Program, Care International in Zimbabwe
28 June 2017 · 11:36 a.m.
Operational Modalities : UNHCR experience
Waheed Lor-Mehdiabadi, Chief of Cash-Based Interventions, UNHCR
28 June 2017 · 11:45 a.m.
Q&A - Operational Modalities
Panel
28 June 2017 · 12:01 p.m.
Scaling Up Cash In East Africa : Panel introduction
Christina Bennett, Head of the Humanitarian Policy Group, ODI
28 June 2017 · 1:32 p.m.
Scaling up Cash in East Africa: Nisar Majid
Nisar Majid, Independent Researcher, Consultant and Visiting Fellow, Feinstein International Centre, Tufts University
28 June 2017 · 1:32 p.m.
Scaling Up Cash In East Africa : ADESO perspective
Deqa Saleh, Cash and Social Protection Advisor, ADESO
28 June 2017 · 1:46 p.m.
Scaling Up Cash In East Africa : WFP perspective
Ernesto Gonzalez, Regional Advisor for cash-based programmes, WFP Bureau for Central and Eastern Africa
28 June 2017 · 1:52 p.m.
Scaling Up Cash In East Africa : Relief International perspective
Alex Gray, Global Humanitarian Director for Relief International
28 June 2017 · 1:58 p.m.
Q&A - Scaling Up Cash In East Africa
Panel
28 June 2017 · 2:06 p.m.
Significant Updates : Panel Introduction
--
28 June 2017 · 2:33 p.m.
Cash Barometer and community perspectives of CTP in Afghanistan
Elias Sagmiester, Programme Manager, Ground Truth Solutions
28 June 2017 · 2:35 p.m.
First long-term trial of a Universal Basic Income, Kenya
Joanna Macrae, Director, European Partnerships, GiveDirectly
28 June 2017 · 2:44 p.m.
Changing from a pipeline to a platform
Paula Gil Baizan, Global Humanitarian Director Cash-Based Programming, World Vision International
28 June 2017 · 2:51 p.m.
Grand Bargain and GHD cash work streams
Emily Henderson, Humanitarian Adviser, DFID
28 June 2017 · 3:02 p.m.
Donor Perspectives : Panel introduction
Thabani Maphosa, Vice President for Food Assistance, World Vision International, World Vision US
28 June 2017 · 3:39 p.m.
Donor Perspectives : ECHO vision
Androulla Kaminara, Director, DG ECHO
28 June 2017 · 3:42 p.m.
Donor Perspectives : Office of Policy and Resources Planning's vision
Paula Reed Lynch, Director, Office of Policy and Resources Planning, Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration
28 June 2017 · 3:49 p.m.
Donor Perspectives : Norway vision
Ingunn Vatne, Minister Counsellor and Head of the Humanitarian team, Permanent Mission of Norway in Geneva
28 June 2017 · 3:58 p.m.
Donor Perspectives : DFID vision
Patrick Saez, Senior Adviser, Humanitarian Policy and Partnerships, DFID, UK
28 June 2017 · 4:08 p.m.
Donor Perspectives : Centre for Global Development vision
Jeremy Konyndyk, Senior Policy Fellow, Centre for Global Development
28 June 2017 · 4:22 p.m.
Q&A - Donor Perspectives
Panel
28 June 2017 · 4:39 p.m.
Closing Remarks
Alex Jacobs, Director, CaLP
28 June 2017 · 5:27 p.m.