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i draw kinda had course yeah sure you have so so there is a trouble you know
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something is not fixed it will end up with me uh and so i also
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have the pleasure of course to welcome you all here as the president to this
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very important event for the faculty i thematically company castro
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i'll take he historical view because i'm not going
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to make any comment on technical issues even soul
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nominally i'm a professor actually is that faculty so my
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boss sits there in the front drawings to be careful um
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and if i get my slides moving which would be tool i could even give
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no doesn't want to move
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somebody can get ah right okay so the historical view is that you may not know this especially people
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from outside of e. p. f. l. that uh e. p. f. l. has been acted in computer science
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very very long time we had a computer science
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department in the eighties we had a famous professor was
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also a thinker who built this little personal computer
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courses mikey in seventy four there's also problem with so
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my back ah screen but that's not so important and uh also nineteen seventy for a long time ago
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and this little device was actually distribute it in schools in
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cow in the canton of will to try to bring a
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computer science that's heights wouldn't work into basic education
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incomparable and that was a nice initially the also generated
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uh other things related to computer science uh
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to operates this little personal computer you needed
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a mouse and a as the same professors rather unique who worked on one of the
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first real nice for computer interfaces which then
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led to logitech a a world famous company
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that i'm sure you're aware of that also sits here on campus with their innovation centre
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now when i was looking at the history i said okay so
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when this is icy research they actually start okay um and since i'm
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i was lucky i was that my lab so i opened up some drawers i found that the first research they
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was actually organised in nineteen ninety six twenty three years ago that was long
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before many of the things we do not want t. p. f. l. uh where
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in place like you know tenure track assistant professors or doctoral schools and it
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was a little workshop on a a very hot topic at that time multimedia networking
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shop give it was actually involved and probably some other people here might remember
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this of course when i look at this it didn't make me feel very good
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because it just shows how old i speak on in the meantime twenty three
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years is a long time but as a point of the slide is to say
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we have guns with very interesting history at e. p. f. l. and in that field of computer science
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and this can be seen of course in the statistics like is the
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number of students that we have a uh you can see ninety six
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was the beginning of the internet bubble so we're just right on timing
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talking about multimedia over the internet is and the bubble burst but you know
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we still use internet and we are of course back to very high numbers of students
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high interest in these feels a a very
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competitive job market be it for our graduates
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whether very easy to find a job but the very competitive market for hiring talent as professors
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at e. p. f. l. but i think a gene will zoom level is that the angle
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maybe comment on this later bowed stole i have a long list here
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of things uh that where dawn like mention night nineteen eighty ones uh
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uh beginning of computer science education so one point
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i want to talk about very briefly as computational thinking
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because computational thinking which is not programming is a way
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of thinking about problems so that computers can find solution
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and if you look at what we do on campus in terms of science and engineering
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beep in chemical engineering between civil engineering between physics et cetera
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we teach math physics that's great and then people end
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up actually solving problems on computers um and we have a
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number of courses such sort of help people understand how to
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solve from some computers but until last year we didn't have
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a specific track specific track at pillar of education that we call computational
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thinking and this is a great reformat e. p. f. l. which is fundamental
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not just for computer science but for the campus that every student goings
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what curriculum at e. p. f. l. will have a pillar in computational thinking
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which of course includes algorithmic spit balls optimisation beta science machine learning et cetera
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and this is a very fundamental transformation and they're ions he is the faculty
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a format typical mucus role plays a very central role in here i'd like to actually
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to thanks a faculty for taking on these jobs for the sake of the campus but
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maybe skip this one i'm avenue they now was the activities in i. n. c. is that is not a
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topic of today is people that work was images and
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it turns out that the images are fundamental not only in
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computer graphics or in computer vision uh but they're fundamental
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across campus to do science and engineering and so we have
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an imaging initiative at e. p. f. l. where and number of people from my and see are involved but also
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many people across campus in physics in biology um
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masses in chemistry and so on which turn around the
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fact what are the best acquisition methods the best out
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range and the best science questions and with this transverse
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all initiative and probably there will be some announcements about
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this about specific uh centres around this i think we're
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doing something where i can see again has a central
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contribution be it using machine learning on data like this
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being in a you know best fact this is on doing open science um and so
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okay i'm going to finish what is the topic of the day i
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understand it's about digital trust okay at topics at these extremely important and i
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always sort of uses pictures that i got from brian ford about the
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stone of raj you know this is a a way off actually said again
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sales and uh in in in in our pacific island where's the
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stone of raw she's sort of known collectively to belong to somebody
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and sonnets exchange nobody wants to move the stone because i think
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it's a town or a townhouse and uh somewhere i chose this
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to politicians i say of course everybody thinks a swiss franc is
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very safe and secure and people trust us with frank but this
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thing actually is you know an early version of block change so
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we can see that actually did you'll trust is very fundamental to society
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like societies are built on trust and the big challenge i think at sea
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at this stage of the development is that it's a notion of digital trust is very
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much up in the air and the best summary of it is to score two on
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that was in the newark or uh things in your times by a petite shop at a you recognise
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our friend so cupboard who takes us as friends and
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pixels arrest was it and it's just totally amazing ow
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what i called the biggest nation on the planet phase because two point something billion users
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has managed to sort of establish its cells as a
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broker of what trust may mean in the twenty first century
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this is all fine uh that's certainly for the person was
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a controlling stake in phase but i'm not sure it's perfectly fine
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for the rest of humanity and so i'm very
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glad that uh you folks discuss the notion of
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ritual trust with some of the key players was
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from outside and from inside of yourself i'll finish by
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again going back to histories is here is a fifty s. anniversary of e. p. f. l. it's extremely porn this is a
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very young school fifty years is very very short in the lifetime
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of the university so we're celebrating this with the number of events
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um with open days where n. c. will be involved a ways
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and innovation they ways i'm also a symposium on open science which
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is one of the initiatives here at e. p. f. l. and
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there is a little bach uh which actually a beautiful bowl of photography
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so that um if you're interested you can get here on campus and such summarise is it's
00:09:07
sort of a short of pictures from the campus today at fifty years of e. p. f. l.

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Conference Program

Welcome address
Martin Vetterli, President of EPFL
6 June 2019 · 9:48 a.m.
Introduction
James Larus, Dean of IC School, EPFL
6 June 2019 · 9:58 a.m.
Introduction
Jean-Pierre Hubaux, IC Research Day co-chair
6 June 2019 · 10:07 a.m.
Adventures in electronic voting research
Dan Wallach, Professor at Rice University, Houston, USA
6 June 2019 · 10:14 a.m.
When foes are friends: adversarial examples as protective technologies
Carmela Troncoso, Assistant Professor at EPFL
6 June 2019 · 11:09 a.m.
Low-Latency Metadata Protection for Organizational Networks
Ludovic Barman, LCA1|DeDiS, EPFL
6 June 2019 · noon
Interactive comparison-based search, and who-is-th.at
Daniyar Chumbalov, INDY 1, EPFL
6 June 2019 · 12:06 p.m.
Decentralized, Secure and Verifiable Data Sharing
David Froelicher, LCA1|DeDiS, EPFL
6 June 2019 · 12:09 p.m.
Communication Efficient Decentralised Machine Learning
Anastasia Koloskova, MLO, EPFL
6 June 2019 · 12:11 p.m.
Detecting the Unexpected via Image Resynthesis
Krzysztof Lis, CVLab, EPFL
6 June 2019 · 12:14 p.m.
Sublinear Algorithms for Graph Processing
Aida Mousavifar, THL4, EPFL
6 June 2019 · 12:16 p.m.
Protecting the Metadata of Your Secret Messages
Kirill Nikitin, DEDIS, EPFL
6 June 2019 · 12:18 p.m.
Teaching a machine learning algorithm faster
Farnood Salehi, INDY 2, EPFL
6 June 2019 · 12:21 p.m.
Secure Microarchitectural Design
Atri Bhattacharyya, PARSA/HexHive, EPFL
6 June 2019 · 12:23 p.m.
Security testing hard to reach code
Mathias Payer, Assistant Professor at EPFL
6 June 2019 · 1:50 p.m.
Best Research Presentation Award Ceremony
Bryan Ford, Jean-Pierre Hubaux, Deirdre Rochat, EPFL
6 June 2019 · 3:54 p.m.