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00:00:01
basically cool uh without benjamin yeah yeah uh should on square
00:00:06
uh should remove the a. x. often say are to this yeah
00:00:10
yeah yeah oh uh have a power along on layer for the
00:00:14
uh so i i come from a company called figure one and it's
00:00:18
an ad for your smart phone that lets healthcare professionals learn from one another
00:00:23
so for the person to learn from another they need to be
00:00:26
curious and that's why our whole business is powered by concur curiosity
00:00:31
and one explain what that is and how it works and how can be harnessed
00:00:37
so i even are at is used primarily by doctors i'm
00:00:40
not a doctor myself i am a patient or not currently
00:00:45
uh but uh as a patient when i go to see a doctor
00:00:50
i think that the doctor knows everything i think you probably due to its um
00:00:55
you walk in you may have a see a headache at finding cough about insomnia
00:01:01
you have something that you aren't sure what it is and you want an answer
00:01:05
and when it's you want a clear pigment planet decision process made by that doctor
00:01:11
the fact is doctors don't know everything and it's increasingly hard for
00:01:16
them to know everything because there's so much more for them to know
00:01:21
you know the medical research that doctor is is but to keep up with is
00:01:24
growing exponentially over the years and it's a commonly said statistic it takes seventeen years for
00:01:31
research evidence to commit accountable tracts so what that means in real terms is that knowledge that
00:01:38
could help your newborn child when we should be a fashion into little has a driver's license
00:01:45
obviously much too slow for anyone who's ever taken a sick child to see the doctor
00:01:50
so how does the that up how do you make sure that doctors are learning
00:01:54
faster entering the information that they need to give you the best care in the moment
00:02:00
well we need curious doctors this is where can probably aussie comes
00:02:04
in we need doctors to want to know what they don't know
00:02:08
and the best source of what they don't know is that the doctors know expand that be
00:02:12
on doctors because figure one is for all health care best was of technical knowledge is other conditions
00:02:19
and the best way for them to communicate with each other is that scale because you want to make sure that
00:02:25
useful knowledge is not a one to one fans for
00:02:28
a ghost as many people as can use it important factors
00:02:34
so this was the idea that led to the town in figure one
00:02:38
so the um i've the physician cofounder was staying at stanford university in to doesn't well
00:02:45
you specifically looking at how doctors residence user doesn't at the time
00:02:50
how residents use social media which was pretty much in its infancy that
00:02:55
and what we observed was that they were using their smart phones to take
00:02:59
pictures of patients of cases and share them with one another via text message
00:03:05
so two big problems with that number one patient privacy not necessary security sure something over text message
00:03:12
especially something that you are you know for the year snapping in in a clinic
00:03:17
and number two so the larger philosophical problem with that
00:03:22
is that if you ever isn't just found something extremely interesting so there's no hope
00:03:26
in with the next case so interesting that they want to share with the callings
00:03:30
shouldn't more people will learn from that information why we keeping it
00:03:34
in this small cluster networking we could potentially expanded to every resident
00:03:39
every nurse every doctor every medical student who could use that information
00:03:45
so there's a saying in a in english in a medicine see one do one teach one
00:03:51
meaning that yeah you watch uh as resident is noticed when you watch a doctor perform procedure
00:03:57
you do that procedure yourself and then you can pass along the information
00:04:02
so to that classic yeah if i had we add figure one because
00:04:05
you can take the knowledge that you've just hot another present another medical student
00:04:10
and teach a huge global community of healthcare professionals
00:04:16
so our has been around for six years on i. m. s. n. and right and on the web
00:04:23
we had tens of thousands of metal cases share even view billions of times
00:04:28
and we've learned from us because we are of course curious
00:04:33
whether we went well we we were what makes doctors pick up their phones and open figure one
00:04:40
and we know uh we like to say that a doctor's health
00:04:44
professionals are bases people were which obviously is flattering for our audience
00:04:48
but you think about we hear from tarzan we talk to them that they you know often don't have time to
00:04:53
yeah have to eat something quickly are used to watch it might make it was like
00:04:57
that and five minutes between patients so we know that the time is extremely extremely valuable
00:05:03
so when they pick up the phone in the open it open up for one we know they're there for basically one of the reasons
00:05:12
they wanna know so first is what they're seeing what am i saying here and this is almost a a hypothetical question
00:05:20
they wanna know this is something a a senior resident might ask a medical student
00:05:24
they know what they're seeing their they just wanna make sure that the other student
00:05:28
knows the junior person room knows they have a look at this time you see
00:05:35
then comes with my colleagues now so this is a genuine a call for how you wanna know
00:05:42
what am i saying here that i don't understand is there's something i'm missing can
00:05:45
someone just give me a up quick console on what i should do in this situation
00:05:53
so is the kind of thing where in a hospital document one of the hallway and confer with a collie
00:05:58
this is the um just when you add when you wanna know what does the word grammy
00:06:03
know what are the what are the smarter people in the room no about what i'm seeing
00:06:08
and finally this is my personal favourite this is really are is on that is
00:06:12
what i'm missing what don't i now we're gonna even know that i don't know
00:06:18
so i can some categorise these three basic questions
00:06:21
if we sort of from us to open our ah
00:06:26
into the categories that right on the right is it can call curiosity is that we
00:06:31
a bucket you can put the atrocity that drives people drives positions
00:06:36
a silly to be curious they wanna know where no there is a
00:06:40
no no no no what they're seeing they wanna share is unknown unknown
00:06:45
they know the callings have this information they just wanna get that information in one as the callings
00:06:50
by the way can you help me and again and my favourite is the uh no no no
00:06:56
what am i missing when i pick up this this phone openness that i wanna see something i
00:07:01
i'm a lesson in how me right now or they can how much more autonomy in five years are
00:07:05
packed this but i never got i have no idea what it is because there's so much out there
00:07:12
so i'm gonna give you some examples from figure one this is so what the cases look like ah
00:07:17
and what the common sense and discussion looks like on at a and explain how these two categories work
00:07:25
so this this is a condition article sign where the uh tips of the fingers you see here
00:07:31
uh expand and if you have had this since you were younger has only live you probably have a heart condition
00:07:39
congenital heart condition if it's something that comes is emergent
00:07:42
it happens later in life it's generally sign of lung cancer
00:07:46
this extremely telling kind of assigned if you see this you definitely should see a doctor
00:07:52
and here we have noticed in sharing this uh uh popping the fingers is common english
00:07:58
uh sharing this textbook case perfect specimen so
00:08:02
this is exactly the doctors were scoring it's a
00:08:05
they it's uh if you wanna learn this is exactly what you should be looking for
00:08:10
so that's a no no and everyone in this conversation knows what is
00:08:14
the new would i wasn't picture in the new it was in the shared
00:08:18
now we get to no no no it's was a bit of a complicated case um what we have here it is
00:08:27
i tell you oh boy i was playing soccer football and uh i was hurt when in
00:08:32
to see uh the doctor was side period to president and surgery had a x. ray done
00:08:39
easy to get it was it was wondering what they were seeing on
00:08:43
the sex what specifically is that it's a dark cluster on the left side
00:08:48
and not to go too far into the um medicine of it or not technique qualified to do that
00:08:54
uh it is they wanna know is this something that serious how do i have to
00:08:59
take further action on this unanswered likely was no from this uh for men or big surgeon
00:09:05
so this is an example of a resident paging as specialised to get more information whether c.
00:09:13
i should know that we're not a tele medicine now this is not a formal consultation wanna doctors
00:09:17
going out of differential diagnosis or just need a little bit of hell technical figure one get that instantly
00:09:26
and finally the unknown unknowns
00:09:29
so this is a patient with a sweeper spinal fluid leak after pituitary surgery
00:09:36
so what what that means is this uh this drop of blood in the centre and spinal
00:09:42
fluid making a halo around it was spotted on the sheets of the bed adaptation was being featured
00:09:48
this is a classic sign again that uh you have if it's but it's coming has been had from our
00:09:55
if you see this when you know you have a spinal fluid early to deal with no it's not just plot
00:10:00
it is variations on howard dependable the sign is but with the family doctors here say if they'd never seen it
00:10:07
before detected for forty years and i didn't know that
00:10:10
and this is just a perfect sign of how uh it
00:10:14
i uh the distribution knowledge in medicine is very uneven
00:10:19
and something that people take for granted that everyone knows
00:10:22
some people never heard of maybe 'cause it's not this one fact this or maybe because it's something they just have not seen
00:10:28
yet so figure one is a way to make them happen see that sooner before this even if you're patient in front of them
00:10:35
also point out that uh a nurse uh in africa point how useful this would be for her because
00:10:42
i'm being remote by having a pure facilities and us a technology
00:10:47
to work with you wanna have those a quick taxes because it
00:10:51
to make a diagnosis and how speed your big here you can get
00:10:57
so what is it that we can do with these two we just the
00:11:00
kinds of curiosity this can go curiosity that are users demonstrate how do we
00:11:05
how we work with that just the basic uh ways that i uh think about the way we
00:11:11
leverage that curiosity reactor ward it we want to scale it
00:11:16
and because we are business we want to monitor i said something about a little bit about how we do each of those things
00:11:23
so who order i mean we all know knowledge should be it's own award but we want we also running
00:11:29
and when people come back as often as they can we wanna make sure that it's providing them maximum value again
00:11:36
health care professionals of the bases people more so they have we
00:11:40
have to respect every moment of your time make sure it's useful
00:11:45
so one of the things we're working on right now is continuing medical education
00:11:49
what we've usually offer offer for the last six years is an informal way
00:11:53
to learn you can open yeah in in a couple minutes you can learn something
00:11:57
you can see what other people seeing you get a glimpse into what what medicine look like in real time all over the world
00:12:05
we're augmenting that with continuing medical education in the united states as or pilot
00:12:10
because doctors have to maintain certain other planets each year and
00:12:15
they can get those but it's to digital applications like figure one
00:12:19
so we make it easy for them to fatima time they spend on for the one in claims bet
00:12:26
we also take figure one off the apple into conferences where we can use our quiz formats to
00:12:32
challenge doctors know there naturally competitive anyone who's into
00:12:36
medical school and residency is obviously gonna competitive streak
00:12:40
so we can leverage that and they can test the knowledge against the callings and they can do it in real time
00:12:48
now scale is uh how knowledge networks work network affects me in basically that the more
00:12:54
people you have on an applet for one more valuable it is for everyone's on it
00:13:00
so was key from the very beginning that we make this as big as
00:13:03
it could be you think back to the example you have a stanford with
00:13:07
text messages we don't want people sending one case to be calling x. we
00:13:11
want as many people have been from from the knowledge in that case as possible
00:13:16
so right now we have to have million users in a hundred nine countries
00:13:21
and i point out for sebastian that we have almost five thousand users in switzerland
00:13:26
um so these are healthcare professionals all on the world's halter students
00:13:30
they're learning from each other their meeting across time zones across borders
00:13:35
all in the thing that they keep that they have in common they all
00:13:38
see patient cases and they all are in charge of improving those patient out out
00:13:44
what a waste we've got a kind of scale is by partnering with hospitals so whatever early
00:13:48
partnerships with mount sinai hospital in new york city one of the leading research hospitals in united states
00:13:55
we bought them onto a variety of formats where they could basically the
00:13:59
goal was to highlight the amazing research because on an amazing characters on there
00:14:04
so we have a couple examples here there uh there neurosurgery department was
00:14:09
ever walk to how they use augmented reality how their brain surgeons will use
00:14:14
a computer simulations to guide them as they do surgery and they will show that for comedian income on answer questions
00:14:21
and we have their physician in chief the very um how expected a cardiologist came on
00:14:27
and answer questions and some more personally but history are hard to get where you got to
00:14:32
where is primary research interests is taking those questions from one from follow cardiologist american students
00:14:38
and then uh the intervention radiology department of the hospital with a logo has their
00:14:43
own account and then going to individual cases will discuss exactly doing in specific cases
00:14:49
i'll say uh that this is something i'm very interested in pursuing so in one here would like to
00:14:55
consider opening perfect one oh hi like this with things that your instructions doing i'm
00:14:59
i'm very go how uh open to helping we would love to welcome you on that for
00:15:05
now for the money part how do we make money uh which i think is a very good question so
00:15:12
there's a lot you can do when you have the attention of two and a half million healthcare professionals around were
00:15:17
and one of the things we do that i'm most proud of is educate them about their disease
00:15:23
so we're diseases are defined as a disease that affects you within one in two thousand people
00:15:29
it's if you have a rare disease you generally spend ten years with it
00:15:34
before you get it correctly diagnosed you see eight specialise in your misdiagnosed three times
00:15:41
so if you can get that diagnosis we're you can get the treatment centre and this is what uh that this
00:15:47
particular disease it's uh uh probably um people point zacharias stores
00:15:52
disorder uh the first one in every hundred thousand newborn works
00:15:57
it's called huntress and on and we partner with the firms to somebody makes the one well that with this in though
00:16:05
to bring on the world's leading experts in on the top where users
00:16:09
explain what it is and a series of quizzes other users spot this animal
00:16:15
so just think that a nurse could see this in the front line
00:16:18
think i don't think that is down syndrome i think it's something else
00:16:21
uh and fly back and basically just as a possibility means
00:16:25
that shouldn't be that much closer to getting the care they need
00:16:32
we can also put a information in front of our users that they might not otherwise of c. so we
00:16:37
pardon with a a a major organisational states to last
00:16:41
year to uh explain the new hypertension guidelines have been issued
00:16:45
so that's basically new ways does new guidelines that change the definition of what high blood pressure was
00:16:51
change the guidelines for how you measure blood pressure and you know the resulting in
00:16:56
fact is huge in terms of concern how many people work have high blood pressure
00:17:00
this was published in journals and it was news stories about it and they did a
00:17:04
mural out but you know that in this is really reach every single person mentioned but structure
00:17:10
they were to augment that strategy but coming on figure one and game refining it so they were able
00:17:15
to do quizzes we could test risky or do you know what you're doing when you measure but pressure
00:17:20
i think one most health care proposals would think they do and we were to find out how many didn't
00:17:26
and with that knowledge yeah we could show this is where we need more education
00:17:32
if only since we have a this huge window this huge community of healthcare professionals misused window on
00:17:38
them a cheating patients every single day we can see exactly what they do and we can see
00:17:45
how their minds work when they are thinking about treating a patient so for instance you have a migraine
00:17:51
and you see a your family doctor you see a neurologist or even you see a nurse in a clinic
00:17:58
what are they gonna say what they can prescribe really thinking about where they suggest what tested they recommend
00:18:04
those are all things that we can plot in aggregate and shares information
00:18:10
and our business women you've been doing it for three years uh and we work with uh uh
00:18:16
nice roster of a blue chip organisations
00:18:19
and um non government organisation from struggle companies
00:18:24
and many of them are repeat customers i'm happy to see so they are getting the results
00:18:28
they want from us they're reaching healthcare professionals on apart from that they want to be reached on
00:18:32
and the communique messages and wait or stay just double and most important useful
00:18:39
so as as it were business based on clinical curiosity and
00:18:42
we're still curious about that there's lots more we wanna do
00:18:46
this is a a project we did earlier this year with a
00:18:49
major newspaper and canada about how healthcare talked about alcohol during pregnancy
00:18:55
the official guidelines say that a woman was pregnant with thinking of becoming pregnant should drink no alcohol in
00:19:01
uh this is in the north american gallons we asked doctors and nurses what they actually tell their patients
00:19:08
one four of them say okay something 'cause for seventy five percent
00:19:13
of them so they don't really have up to date information on this
00:19:16
again this is the kind of thing where we can get that information and shared in
00:19:20
a way that people can take action much um a machine learning in artificial intelligence of
00:19:27
course uh these are hot topics in technology this is things that we've uh explores well
00:19:32
in the machine learning every simple form can take a picture of an electro cardio graham
00:19:38
plot the points on it so we have we have tens of thousands of these pictures there often blurry
00:19:43
or there where we call the data points out in concrete data that is easy to measure and compare
00:19:50
and finally this i'm very excitable is a new partnership we have
00:19:53
with the children's hospital los angeles because pediatrics hostels in united states
00:19:58
they have a heck of on with their that fine to gamer five
00:20:00
pediatrics with the trying to do is uh increase the uh would be
00:20:06
help the young patients who have diabetes specifically uh do things like nested like because properly
00:20:12
take your insulin is well things that if i think of better ways me give patients
00:20:17
so creating system the then sharing of figure one so other health care professionals
00:20:21
can come in and say i would do this differently i would do that differently
00:20:25
i work part into they can just instilling ascii huge community how can i make this prototype better
00:20:31
is that something we do with other medical startups as well i get another conversation happy to have
00:20:37
so in conclusion uh we're looking for any sort of organisations hospitals start ups were
00:20:43
interested in reaching this kind of community in bringing good clinical information to this community
00:20:48
uh in in showcasing some innovations innovative stuff that they're doing and uh
00:20:54
i'm happy to take questions now or uh in the lobby afterwards thank you
00:21:04
take your remote for the presentation yeah a question of the presentation
00:21:13
s. e. i. to grow closer to the most sorry uh things with the presentation thank you
00:21:19
i have two questions um how do you get access
00:21:24
how to do a biblical petitions get access to up
00:21:30
okay sorry uh could you you're my first yeah i heard so i won't take that one first so we start we want to reach as
00:21:38
many people as possible and one for the knowledge and people as possible
00:21:41
so anyone can download figure one it's in the ass for example play
00:21:45
to signing you have to be you can be an observer which means you can look at what's on there
00:21:50
you can post or comment or you sign in as a health care professional and then we verify your credentials
00:21:55
so we do have a large we provoking everybody once you get in your to go through
00:21:59
a series of stages before you can actually upload cases it's a good question but it like this
00:22:06
how do you uh uh what measures do you take to prevents personally identifiable information
00:22:12
of patient to pure form that that is the big question and let us to uh
00:22:17
so the best way to keep a secret is not to have a secret we uh exist entirely
00:22:22
outside of hip or the uh the patient privacy act we don't know any identifying details on a platform
00:22:29
we uh you have a face block technology they are likely botany faces but on the platform uh every user you get a
00:22:36
a sort of swedish editing tools you can cut or anything like a a number on an x. ray i date of birth
00:22:41
you know how to mention times dates locations in your
00:22:44
captions we've a twenty four hour monitoring tina checks every single
00:22:48
case it goes out and we have a budget of flag any case that has any of those in for any that
00:22:52
information and the best part of that is that there's no loss in the educational value of the cases even when you
00:22:59
remove that information okay thanks okay maybe the last question before
00:23:06
the launch telling you know it's always the f. with question
00:23:13
yes we will you had the thank you very much for your presentation
00:23:20
and what's the police young when patients be part of a bit of people that come on
00:23:28
it's something we thought about a lot was nothing we do at the current time um
00:23:32
we think that might be of a possibility for patients choose to use it as a service eventually but but now
00:23:38
it's really a mini for health care professionals d. c. thank
00:23:44
you thank you very much but some uh for your presentation

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Conference Program

Mots de bienvenue
Sébastien Mabillard, CEO | Swiss Digital Health
7 June 2019 · 9:05 a.m.
Mots de bienvenue
Victor Fournier, Chef de Service de la santé publique | Canton du Valais
7 June 2019 · 9:09 a.m.
Mots de bienvenue
Laurent Sciboz , Directeur des instituts informatiques
7 June 2019 · 9:14 a.m.
Vidéo avec Nao
7 June 2019 · 9:23 a.m.
Soutenir le parcours du patient à l'ère du numérique
Frédéric Ehrler, R&D chef de groupe Interaction homme-machine et capteurs, HUG (Suisse)
7 June 2019 · 9:28 a.m.
La santé à l'ère des assistants numériques
Yariv Adan, Chef produits Google Assistant, GOOGLE (Suisse)
7 June 2019 · 9:56 a.m.
Preventive medicine at home allows health costs reduction
Guillaume Dupasquier, CEO, Domosafety
7 June 2019 · 10:29 a.m.
Introduction de la 2ème partie, Assistants @ Home
Sébastien Mabillard, CEO | Swiss Digital Health
7 June 2019 · 11:22 a.m.
How humanoid robot can be an assistant to the healthcare personnel
Thierry Perronnet, General Manager, Avatarion Technology (Switzerland)
7 June 2019 · 11:24 a.m.
Physical Therapy made Digital ? The new standard of care for the next 50 years
André Eiras Dos Santos, COO, General Manager EMEA & APAC, SWORD HEALTH (Portugal)
7 June 2019 · 11:54 a.m.
Aging in Place – A story of intelligent design and assistive technology
James Wyman, COO & co-founder, PILLO HEALTH (USA)
7 June 2019 · 12:14 p.m.
The Power of Clinical Curiosity
Benjamin Errett, Senior Director of Brand, FIGURE 1 (Canada)
7 June 2019 · 12:43 p.m.
Introduction à la 3ème partie: Seeds of innovation and pre-arranged meetings
Sébastien Mabillard, CEO | Swiss Digital Health
7 June 2019 · 2:04 p.m.
A conversational robot doubles the success rate of quitting smoking
Roland Savioz and Michael Schumacher, OBEEONE / HES-SO Valais-Wallis (Switzerland)
7 June 2019 · 2:07 p.m.
What are the challenges facing the health system in the face of the digitalization of family life?
Maddalena Di Meo, CEO & founder, BABY & KIDS CARE (Switzerland)
7 June 2019 · 2:29 p.m.
How do health companions change our daily lives?
Giovanni Joerger, Marketing & sales director, OFAC (Switzerland)
7 June 2019 · 2:47 p.m.
Soignez-Moi.ch: your doctor without delay
Romain Boichat, COO & co-founder, SOIGNEZ-MOI.CH (Switzerland)
7 June 2019 · 3:10 p.m.
Table ronde
7 June 2019 · 3:29 p.m.
Conclusions
Sébastien Mabillard, CEO | Swiss Digital Health
7 June 2019 · 4:24 p.m.