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00:00:00
Okay thanks Andreas think I'm gonna go
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for a question. I think that maybe I
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should ask one myself myself. Now so
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I'm representing in fact into the door
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by engineering which is part of the
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EPFL school of life sciences those who
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were here this morning. So probably the
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presentation by were being these move
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on the hoods. So we I shouldn't
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actually go over all the numbers that
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you see actually behind me perhaps just
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pointing out that we actually have a
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somewhat unique inter faculty
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institutes institute of bioengineering
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that actually combines faculty from the
00:00:34
school of life sciences but also
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faculty from different engineering
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departments that we actually just heard
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about for example Francesco still achy
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that you heard about is part of the IBI
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say finally that funny like or and so
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forth. So it's a very which interaction
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actually between biologically oriented
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labs and those are actually are more
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focused on applications which of course
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is an interesting a merger. So that
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actually really brings us to the
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definition of what we're trying to
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achieve it in life sciences institute
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of bioengineering which is really
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engineering life. Right so with
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engineering life we try to achieve a
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strong fundamental foundation in
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biology that is profoundly quantitative
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and as I already alluded to really like
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to achieve this by interfacing very
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profoundly but technology. And we also
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like to use actually a lot of the
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engineering principles that are
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commonly used by our colleagues. And to
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really use these principles to try to
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think about how we could actually
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design of a pilot is novel
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applications. So the the school of life
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sciences is organised section for
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institutes it as the brain mine
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institute the global health institute
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which is suppose mostly focuses on on
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on neglected diseases tropical diseases
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pathogens then you have the cancer
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research institute the name speaks for
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itself and then I'm a member actually
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of the institute of bioengineering that
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I alluded to as being rather unique in
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life sciences because it's in in the
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faculty institute I'm not gonna discuss
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the the the the teaching organisation
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because this was already mentioned also
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this morning wanna go right into what
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is probably the most important for this
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afternoon which is basically how we
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structure interactions with industry
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that is actually via collaborative
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research does not like really new here.
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But I'm just gonna like to I'd just
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like to point out that here in life
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sciences were also very much interested
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in translation we'd like to also I
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generate a lot of IP and and interact
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with with established companies but
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also of course license out or a
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research inventions and perhaps leading
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to the creation of startups and as I
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was so you later we also have quite a
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few companies that invest in life
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sciences by for example establishing a
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sponsor partnerships to chairs for
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example for faculty is something that
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was perhaps not mentioned as profoundly
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at what we also very much interested in
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in life sciences initiative by
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engineers to reach out to the clinic
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I'm gonna finish my presentation but
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actually showing an example of how we
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try to reach out to the clinic in and
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you sent a lot is being created that
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actually many of those are very excited
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about so what are some of the companies
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involved here you can actually see some
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of the symbols and many of them will
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look familiar to you because of course
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we have a significant representation of
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the farm industry which is very well
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represented in Switzerland in general
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but there's also many companies
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actually focus on by attribute expired
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technological applications and
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biomedical sciences. And just to give
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you a more general overview which is a
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measly also a nice overview of the
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portfolio that we cover in the
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institute of bioengineering and life
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sciences in general here are some of
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the topics that are being worked on to
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these collaborations for example
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there's a a collaboration on organ on a
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chip for micro technologies where we
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have to now point to somewhat bypass
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animal models which are also mention on
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the slide but here given you know the
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ad takes that is involved of course we
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write we would like to move away from
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animal models are really start
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investing in organs that are now being
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drawn on a chip that we can also use
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for a biomedical testing. There's of
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course also the discovery validation of
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novel disease mechanisms that therapies
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that we can conclude lead to new new
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drugs development of of novel
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antibodies and also by technological
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reagents and equipment that for example
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can allow us to now look at sells jeans
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in in all kinds of different ways we
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have a very interesting partnership
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also with the witness lee to for
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example look at the effects of the
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traditional on behaviour in biology.
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And finally there's also of course in
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interest in normal synthetic pathways
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for the production of fuels. And
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chemicals. So how was the structured
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again there's nothing new you it's very
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much follows the the pattern that
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you're ready see that was shown by my
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colleagues here basically one third of
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the collaborations are really to DCTI
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grants which I think are are very
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fruitful and involved in one as well
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I'm gonna talk about it there's very
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briefly because they actually really
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allow you to to to to in a very well
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defined framework explore very
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interesting interactions and the other
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two swords are actually direct
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interactions with the industry now in
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terms of invention disclosures and
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priority findings and so forth where
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we're we're proud happy to say that
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life sciences is actually very much on
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the rise in that regard again you see
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this kind of staircase here but it's
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good use because it's on the rise and
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why is that probably because one of it
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is that we're still a fairly young
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school young institute we were started
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sore established around two thousand
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three so obviously it takes some time
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to really gear up new technologies new
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collaborations. But of course a a
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second item which I think is really
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important here is the ongoing dynamics
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which are excellent actually in the
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field of biomedical sciences in the
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lake Geneva region. So obviously this
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is being capitalise and this is also
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reflected here on the graphs that you
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see so of course this is a very rich
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foundation to actually then I need to
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start ups and and and a new car
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companies. And in fact if you look now
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at EPFL spinoffs in general you can see
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that about twenty nine percent of all
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spinoffs in fact in two thousand
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fifteen warning to the medical and
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biotech industry if you look now a
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little bit closer into these numbers in
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fact life sciences represented twenty
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eight percent of those which is
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actually the the highs number two
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thousand fifteen so obviously were
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actually quite proud of so focusing on
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some of some success stories there's a
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a key on which was actually started by
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by just Hubble and former director of
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institute of engineering and melody
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Schwartz the actually focus on on on
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reducing the Imogen is that the of
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therapeutic proteins which actually
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helps in the battle against older
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immune diseases theirs is very entry
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intriguing and successful company the
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race now already one hundred and ten
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million dollars started by over one get
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colleague from the brain mine institute
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mine maze which actually explodes
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virtual reality for neural rehab within
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the rehabilitation. And then there's
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this recent exciting you company G or
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the durability exact recently actually
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race more than thirty six million. I
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started by professor codeine which
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actually focuses on trying to make
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paralyse people walk again now if we
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focus specifically on on companies that
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are willing to to buy engineering
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professors here are a couple again
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there's there's some very nice success
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for the success stories to talk about
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perhaps a focus on one here this is it
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that this which is actually a company
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that was started in ninety seven
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already by a colleague of ours
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professor because there's there's
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you'll a plus and what they focused on
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was actually a gastric bands in a
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battle against obesity that actually
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could be remotely controlled. And so
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basically they erased actually quite a
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bit of money in the process but amber
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finally sold to allergen for an even
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larger amount so this is clearly and I
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success already only unfortunate thing
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about is that then a couple of years
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later they were shut down but I guess
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it's just part of of of industry
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dynamics. Now I take the liberty to
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also focus actually on one other
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company which is actually a company
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that I co founded together with Reading
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the coder in two thousand eleven entity
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normal why do I mention it because of
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course I know the most of it. But also
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because it represents an intriguing new
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industry before question talk about the
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new industries three point zero four
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point zero in genome actually I think
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perhaps reflects some of that because
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it's actually not a nightie company nor
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is it is a biotech companies so for
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many people including investors it's
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sometimes difficult to position these
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new companies and so one of my call
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outs to the industry is to actually try
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to redefine and not necessarily
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classify all structures new industries
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but really try to exploit basically the
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new dynamics of information gathering
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software is that many of these
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disciplines are not merging in exciting
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new ones. So what is a gene on doing
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it's a software company as I said we
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found that it in two thousand eleven
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we're now having three three offices
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actually one in in Switzerland one in
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Belgium in in one and united states.
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And number about twenty five employees
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and we're actually headquartered here
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at at the at the innovation park. So
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what we're focusing on actually is is
00:09:02
is the management of the get big data
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for labs as you might be aware in in
00:09:06
biological sciences been a huge
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revolution in data gathering I mean now
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we're looking not only a jeans anymore
00:09:12
but entirety norms that of course
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requires an enormous amount of data
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processing and in fact most of the data
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management problem software is that
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we're out there were actually not come
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not fit not adequate to actually handle
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this type of data mounds realising this
00:09:27
we started this company and now
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actually trying to really capitalise on
00:09:30
the new wave of all makes genome X
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probably or mix that's about a mix and
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is actually seems to be going up pretty
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well because there's a lot of the man
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for it so basically in general we're
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now actually catering not only for the
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the research labs. But also actually
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for industry for diagnostics et cetera
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including including by Banks in so
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initially we started only in the
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research last but I just said now we
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actually a feature in the in vitro
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diagnostics and we're also actually
00:10:01
present in in production maps and so
00:10:03
you can now see some of our our
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customers again because of of
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investment issues and defining what we
00:10:10
are precisely we actually have to grow
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this business quite organically and and
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as we did so we actually were
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increasingly appreciated by the
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industry so we hope this will continue
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a now we actually list among our
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customers some very well respected one
00:10:23
including the FDA in united states. And
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one other which is college and and here
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just to give you an example of what
00:10:29
we're exactly doing at this biotech Raj
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quite a company card gender realising
00:10:34
basically that they have to change
00:10:35
their portfolio from simple
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instrumentation which they don't sell
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as well as kids reagents that they can
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sell collapse from a new business model
00:10:44
which they call sample to insights with
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that they mean that actually now they
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give biggest value to information
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rather than to equipment and reagents
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it so what they're trying to do is to
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bring in the sample analyse it and then
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bring back the report to the customer
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whether this is a doctor or a clinician
00:11:01
it doesn't really matter. So they
00:11:03
already have all it takes to actually
00:11:04
taken the sample they have all it takes
00:11:06
to do the analysis but what they didn't
00:11:07
have is actually the management
00:11:09
software. And allow the data transfer
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from one instruments to the next to it
00:11:13
to be analysed and finally for the
00:11:15
report to be generated and that's
00:11:17
exactly what for example now you know
00:11:19
is is is the file. So basically in
00:11:23
terms of sponsors of terrorism has
00:11:25
already alluded to there's also quite a
00:11:27
few I'm very happy with those we hope
00:11:29
this will extreme expand in the future
00:11:31
because of the mealy actually sets the
00:11:32
right sound for for interesting and
00:11:34
constructive interactions with industry
00:11:36
does a couple mentioned here. And so
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finally I'm gonna concludes with this
00:11:41
very interesting and exciting
00:11:43
initiative as to how we plan to
00:11:44
translate to the clinic and this is
00:11:46
exemplified by this major initiative in
00:11:48
cancer which is the swiss cancer centre
00:11:50
in those on which actually has been
00:11:52
established to strategic alliance would
00:11:54
rush. And what is actually one of the
00:11:56
key teams here is that basically in a
00:11:59
new engineering will be used as new
00:12:01
terribly in the fight against cancer is
00:12:05
so it combines several institutes
00:12:07
obviously the shoes university all
00:12:09
three of those on university was on
00:12:11
itself with different campuses also any
00:12:14
polynesian also the one right next to
00:12:16
the issue of the big institute centre
00:12:18
and then as well DPFL which is the
00:12:21
initiative is here headed by professor
00:12:23
a dog and again. It's only the goal is
00:12:26
to really integrate all the talents
00:12:28
from these different institutes going
00:12:29
from chemistry by engineering to the
00:12:31
cancer research institute itself over
00:12:34
pathology surgery and you know biology.
00:12:37
And so this is gonna happen through the
00:12:40
building of actually well to the
00:12:43
establishment of a new building which
00:12:44
actually will be located right next to
00:12:46
the sure of it's the egg or a building
00:12:48
for translational cancer research where
00:12:50
we really gonna try to call S actually
00:12:52
different types of resources from
00:12:54
clinical cancer researchers to buy you
00:12:56
immune region use chemist and so on.
00:12:59
And so what are some of the the teams
00:13:01
that we gonna cover here has already
00:13:03
said it's true it partnership with with
00:13:06
rush and several grants everybody been
00:13:10
awarded several teams already running
00:13:12
some experiments and there's a second
00:13:14
component that will actually also
00:13:16
facilitate only stage clinical trials
00:13:18
if for example some exciting progress
00:13:20
has been made to some of the early
00:13:22
starting rounds that were already
00:13:24
awarded. So here are the teams so what
00:13:26
we're trying to do is to for example
00:13:28
used is a lap once it technologies
00:13:29
which are very exciting microphone like
00:13:31
seventy tissues arrays to for example
00:13:35
measure and and and detect new immune
00:13:38
responses in in in in response to
00:13:41
cancer for example wanna use some of
00:13:43
the by one animate materials in
00:13:45
collaboration with institutes of course
00:13:47
that we already heard about four more
00:13:48
effective therapeutic vaccines rapids
00:13:51
antibody discovery we gonna engineer
00:13:53
proteins as X scenes and also focus on
00:13:56
delivery technologies that are yet
00:13:58
still probably defined in so we're
00:14:00
hoping to make some progress on that
00:14:02
regard as well and then of course also
00:14:04
a big part of that is modelling
00:14:05
computational analyses for systems
00:14:08
immunology and again in C local
00:14:10
development for example of new
00:14:12
antibodies and you add reputed designs.
00:14:15
So obviously this is gonna require a
00:14:16
highly collaborative effort involving
00:14:18
engineers terminologies medical doctors
00:14:21
and so on and so on. And this is the
00:14:22
final really by the division by
00:14:24
division here by this cancer centre
00:14:26
which is truly the fine by
00:14:28
collaborations between the souvenir
00:14:30
TPFL to bring these interdisciplinary
00:14:32
research is together the funding is
00:14:34
gonna be secured for cross
00:14:36
institutional both investigator
00:14:37
research teams to truly kind of
00:14:39
highlights and nurture this
00:14:41
interdisciplinary aspect. And then this
00:14:43
one also gonna be project based data
00:14:45
like that for my engineering groups in
00:14:46
egg or building a so with that I wanna
00:14:49
thank you for your attention and maybe

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Conference Program

Message de Bienvenue
Demetri Psaltis, Doyen de la Faculté STI
18 May 2016 · 10:03 a.m.
297 views
Message de Bienvenue
Pierre Vandergheynst, Vice-Provot pour la formation EPFL
18 May 2016 · 10:14 a.m.
174 views
Introduction pour le professeur Nico de Rooij
Demetri Psaltis, Doyen de la Faculté STI
18 May 2016 · 10:19 a.m.
174 views
Manier la recherche et les collaboration industrielles
Nico de Rooij, Laboratoire des capteurs, actionneurs et microsystèmes (SAMLAB), Institut de Microtechnique, EPFL
18 May 2016 · 10:21 a.m.
126 views
Profiter de la recherche académique au sein d'une PME - Expérience de Melexis SA
Caroline Heid, Melexis SA, Bevaix
18 May 2016 · 10:54 a.m.
307 views
Profiter de la recherche académique au sein d'une PME - Expérience de Andritz Hydro
Manfred Sallaberger, Chief Engineer, Andritz Hydro, Vevey
18 May 2016 · 11:10 a.m.
Les outils de soutien à l'innovation - présentation par Mme la Vice Présidente pour l'Innovation et la Valorisation
Adrienne Corboud Fumagalli, Vice Présidente pour l'Innovation et la Valorisation
18 May 2016 · 11:30 a.m.
Les outils de soutien à l'innovation - présentation par la CTI
Catherine Jean, Alliance, Coordinatrice CTI pour l'EPFL
18 May 2016 · 11:36 a.m.
Les outils de soutien à l'innovation - présentation par Innovaud
Jean-Michel Stauffer, Innovaud, Conseiller en Innovation
18 May 2016 · 11:44 a.m.
Les outils de soutien à l'innovation - présentation la STI
Sebastian Gautsch, Coordinateur des stage STI
18 May 2016 · 11:53 a.m.
Les activités de recherches au sein de l'Institut de Génie Mécanique
John Botsis, Directeur de l'institut de Génie Mécanique
18 May 2016 · 1:19 p.m.
Les activités de recherches au sein de l'Institut de Microtechnique
Christian Enz, Directeur de l'Institut de Microtechnique
18 May 2016 · 1:38 p.m.
Les activités de recherches au sein de l'Institut de Génie Electrique
Giovanni de Micheli, Directeur de l'Institut de Génie Electrique
18 May 2016 · 2:18 p.m.
Life Sciences at EPFL
Bart Deplancke, Institut de Bio-ingénieurie
18 May 2016 · 2:34 p.m.
103 views
Témoignage d'étudiants: Chloé Waeber, chez Dentsply Sirona
Chloé Waeber, Materials Engineer
18 May 2016 · 2:52 p.m.
162 views
Témoignage d'étudiants: Etienne Thalmann, au CSEM
Etienne Thalmann, EPFL Graduate in Mechanical Engineering
18 May 2016 · 2:58 p.m.
118 views
Témoignage d'étudiants: Pierre Fechting, chez ABB
Pierre Fechting, Corporate Research, ABB Switzerland
18 May 2016 · 3:05 p.m.
Témoignage d'étudiants: Rebekka Anker, chez Gait Up
Rebekka Anker, Support Manager, Gait Up
18 May 2016 · 3:11 p.m.
134 views
191 views

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